Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am struggling really hard to understand this behavior so maybe someone can shed some light on the situation. I simply can't figure out why I can't return a pointer to a struct from a method and expect to be able to still re-use it afterwards.

As you can see the generateSmallMatrix() method creates an int[] array and sets it inside the ysmf struct that I then return to main. Main then takes the ysmf* and calls printArray (again). And on the third try the array cannot be retrieved any more.. It's driving me crazy..

I have checked with my Eclipse debugger that on all calls the location of matrix->A is identical (0x7fffffffe180 - so for all I know about C pointers any form of accessing that int should return the correct value - be it *(ax++) or ax[i]) .. but neither do..

Very frustrating to say the least, so here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct sparseMatrix
{
    int* A;
} ysmf;

void printArray(int* ax, int length) {
    int i = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        printf("%i,", ax[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
}

ysmf* generateSmallMatrix()
{
    ysmf *matrix = malloc(sizeof(ysmf));

    int a[] = {1,2,3,9,1,4};
    printArray(a, 6);                   // returns 1,2,3,9,1,4,
    matrix->A = a;
    printArray(matrix->A, 6);           //returns 1,2,3,9,1,4,
    //printArray(matrix->A, 6);

    return matrix;
}


int main(void) {
    ysmf* matrix = generateSmallMatrix();
    printArray(matrix->A, 6);           //returns 1,6,-7856,32767,1,4,
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

You can see the problem occuring where I have inserted the comments.

I know this is probably something totally basic I shouldn't have missed..

share|improve this question
    
Your code would be much more readable with better names. For example why did you choose A and a? –  Celeritas Jun 25 '12 at 23:36
    
@Celeritas: For a simple test-case, this is perfectly readable. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 25 '12 at 23:51
    
@OliCharlesworth never hurts to do a good job. –  Celeritas Jun 26 '12 at 6:47
    
This is due to the fact that the larger problem I was working on is a YSMF (Yale Sparse Matrix Format) format where in the specification the arrays to hold the matrix data are called A, IA, and JA. That's why I used A as a variable name.. The ax was just a test to see if array is not a reserved word or something :) –  Tigraine Jun 26 '12 at 8:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because a is a local array, whose lifetime ends when the generateSmallMatrix() function ends. Accessing it after that results in undefined behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
So the solution would be to use malloc() and then memcpy()? –  Tigraine Jun 25 '12 at 23:29
    
@Tigraine: Yes. (And free(), obviously!) –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 25 '12 at 23:33

This line

ysmf *matrix = malloc(sizeof(ysmf));

Allocates only enough space for your ysmf struct, which in this case, is just an int pointer. So you then go and point that at 'a'.

matrix->A = a;

The problem is that a is on the stack. So it is now pointing at this memory address but when you exit the function that memory is no longer reserved for the array.

If you instead malloced memory for 'a' and pointed your struct at that, then you would be OK.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.. Oli already pointed me in the right direction and I managed to fix the issue.. It's just very frustrating to debug since the issue randomly appeared a few lines after generateSmallMatrix() returned when the memory was re-used for another assignment.. –  Tigraine Jun 26 '12 at 8:31

Try this...

ysmf* generateSmallMatrix()
{
    ysmf *matrix = malloc(sizeof(ysmf));

    int a[] = {1,2,3,9,1,4};
    printArray(a, 6);

    matrix->A = malloc(sizeof(int) * 6);
    memcpy(matrix->A, a, sizeof(int) * 6);
    printArray(matrix->A, 6);

    return matrix;
}

Now outside of the generateSmallMatrix function you should be able to print the correct values. However, be sure to free what was malloc'd.

int main(void) {
    ysmf* matrix = generateSmallMatrix();
    printArray(matrix->A, 6);

    free(matrix->A);
    free(matrix);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.