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My website consists of many products that are each contained in a div with the id content block. The link, image, background, description and price are all loaded from a mySQL table. My original plan was to save the below html code as a string and loop over the rows in the mySQL table filling the string I created with php/mySQL values.

I was wondering if I am going about this the right way, or is there a better way to create html code from php variables?

<div id="contentblock" style="background-image:url(images/$BACKGROUND.png);">
    <div id="picture"><a href="$LINK"><img src="$IMAGELINK"/></a></div>
    <div id="description"><p>$DESCRIPTION</p></div>
    <div id="price"><p class=price>$PRICE</p></div>
</div>
share|improve this question
    
Is this code block part of a loop? –  Paul Dessert Jun 26 '12 at 0:17
1  
Depending on how frequently you reuse this, you could create a class which takes the Id or Data row and has a GenerateHtml() method. This would give you cleaner code but may be needless overhead if its only used in a few places –  Basic Jun 26 '12 at 0:17
1  
sounds relatively standard, if you don't want to use a template engine. –  Dagon Jun 26 '12 at 0:17
    
Incidentally, be careful manipulating strings in memory as strings are immutable - better to output directly if you're generating a large page –  Basic Jun 26 '12 at 0:18
    
Could you provide more info on a template engine? that seems to be what I am after. EDIT: it seems that my original plan is very similar to a template generator. –  acidic Jun 26 '12 at 0:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Firstly PHP is a template engine - in my experience template engines that layer ontop of PHP are only good for the simplest of cases and are easily outgrown.

Secondly the original code is as good as any method. At risk of stating the obvious to make it better abstract it into a function;

function output_block($BACKGROUND, $LINK, $IMAGELINK, $DESCRIPTION, $PRICE)
{
    echo "<div id='contentblock' style='background-image:url(images/$BACKGROUND.png);'>
        <div id='picture'><a href='$LINK'><img src='$IMAGELINK'/></a></div>
        <div id='description'><p>$DESCRIPTION</p></div>
        <div id='price'><p class=price>$PRICE</p></div>
    </div>";
}

If you want to make it much better then adopt a framework, an entire admin config page is show below. All of the HTML glue is provided by the framework - the following code is real, but really to illustrate how a framework can provide a lot of the grunge work for you.

In the example below if I want to edit a single entity I'd change the TableViewEdit into a FormView and provide an instance of an entity rather than an iterable list.

$entity = new CbfConfig();  // Database entity
$page = new AdminWebPage("Site Configuration"); // Page for output

/*
 * build the view
 */
$vil = new ViewItemList();

$col = &$vil->add(new ViewItem("description","Description"));
$col->get_output_transform()->allow_edit(false); // this field cannot be editted
$col = &$vil->add(new ViewItem("value","Value"));

$v1 = new TableViewEdit($entity, $vil,"admin_values"); // present as standard editable table

/*
 * output the page
 */
$page->begin();
$iterable_list = CbfConfig::site_begin();
$page->add_body($v1->get_output($iterable_list,'admin_config'));
$page->end();
share|improve this answer

Id just have all my html code outside of php tags, then whereever I need a variable from php do as follows

<div id="description"><p><?php echo $DESCRIPTION; ?></p></div>

You can loop around non php code too. For example

<?php

for($i = 0; $i < 10; $i++) {
?>
<div id="description"><p><?php echo $i; ?></p></div>
<?php
} //end for loop
?>

Obviously this is just an example.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not know how many products there will be, so the html code must be generated in php –  acidic Jun 26 '12 at 0:20
    
Ive reedited my post to show how you can loop around non php code in php. This way you dont need tow orry about storing the html itself in variables. –  Jon Taylor Jun 26 '12 at 0:21
    
@JonTaylor You'd be better to give a foreach($RecordSet as $Row) {} example - That way, you don't need to guess/read the record count and it's more readable –  Basic Jun 26 '12 at 0:28
    
@Basic I agree, however I was simply giving an example of using a loop around non php code. I think its far more beneficial to someone learning to show them the basics and have them figure out the rest. –  Jon Taylor Jun 26 '12 at 0:29

well if im without a template engine for somereason i usually do something like:

function partial($file, $args = array()) {
  extract($args);
  ob_start();
  include($file);
  return ob_get_clean();
}
share|improve this answer

Really, there are 3 ways of doing this. Use whichever is easiest for you in the context that you are using it in.

<?php
while(($row=mysql_fetch_assoc($result))!==false)
{
    echo "<div>{$row['fieldName']}</div>";
}
?>

<?php
while(($row=mysql_fetch_assoc($result))!==false)
{
    echo '<div>'.$row['fieldName'].'</div>';
}
?>

<?php
while(($row=mysql_fetch_assoc($result))!==false)
{
?>
    <div><?= $row['fieldName']; ?></div>
<?php
}
?>
share|improve this answer
    
could concatenate a variable and echo it once. –  Dagon Jun 26 '12 at 0:20
    
In general, you want to avoid doing that. Memory usage can spike a lot if you're storing all your data into a variable instead of echoing it out as you receive it. –  teh1 Jun 26 '12 at 0:21
    
If that's the case, you'd better get a new server! –  Paul Dessert Jun 26 '12 at 0:22
    
paul is right, in general if there is a memory usage issue with this approach, then there are other problems. Also it is faster (very slightly) than the multiple echo version –  Dagon Jun 26 '12 at 0:23
    
@Dagon doing it per-row is not too bad but generating a whole page by concatenating into a string is a huge waste of resources for no advantage - you lose all the benefits of streaming as well as leaving hundreds of copies of a string lying about. I agree it's not a prime consideration but why do it unless there's a really good reason? –  Basic Jun 26 '12 at 0:26

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