Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any convention about how/where to specify application's version number?

For example, for the ruby gems lib/mygem/version.rb is the file generally used for that purpose.

My guess would be creating config/version.rb file like that:

module MySite
  VERSION = "0.0.4"

  # or in MySite::Application class
  # 
  # class Application
  #   VERSION = "0.0.4"
  # end
end
share|improve this question
    
See this: stackoverflow.com/a/6178378/1352240 –  YuriAlbuquerque Jun 26 '12 at 1:26
    
You can do this as I answered earlier: stackoverflow.com/a/23135266/2881964 –  Valeriy Valer'evich Apr 17 '14 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I will reply my own question, I was not able to find a better answer.

Since Rails application is basically MySite::Application I thought app's version should be accessed by MySite::Application::VERSION so create :

config/initializers/version.rb

module MySite
  class Application
    VERSION = "0.0.4"
  end
end

or config/version.rb and require this file from config/application.rb

share|improve this answer

I add my own version to the Configuration class with an initializer:

app_version.rb

class Configuration
  class << self
    attr_accessor :app_version
  end
  @app_version = 0.72
end

Within the app, I can pull the version:

@app_version = Configuration.app_version

Not sure why you want to use the version, but I often use versioning so I can see if a particularly version of code is actually running. In that case, I need every code revision to be reflected as a new version, so I use the Git version on my code and often just display the first few characters of it since that is likely unique enough to identify it.

@git_version = `git show --pretty=%H`[0..39]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.