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Why does the below program output 11 and not 12?. Does not the thread use the same instance variables? Please explain?

public class Tester extends Thread {

private int i;

public static void main(String[] args){
 Tester t = new Tester();
 t.run();
 System.out.print(t.i);
 t.start();
 System.out.print(t.i);

}

public void run(){ i++;}

}

The above code compiles fine. i is defaulted to 0 value on construction of object. In happens before relation concept all code executed prior to start of thread is completed. The concept is - instance variables are shared across multiple threads - here there are two threads running - the main thread and the Tester thread. So i should shared with both threads? - if i is shared and if happens-before relation is maintained before starting Tester thread then the value of incremented i should be visible to the Tester thread?

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5  
I don't even see why you think it should print 11. –  Ed S. Jun 26 '12 at 1:53
1  
This is a trick question! It can't print 11 or 12 it will not even compile! Almost got us –  John Vint Jun 26 '12 at 2:05
    
I don't see why you think it should print anything other than possibly 0? –  Jarrod Roberson Jun 26 '12 at 4:21
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5 Answers

Give to your new thread the time to increase the variable, try with

public static void main(String[] args){
  Tester t = new Tester();
  t.run();
  System.out.println(t.i);
  t.start();
  try {
    Thread.sleep(1000); // 1 sec
  } catch (Exception ex) {}
  System.out.println(t.i);
}

The only problem in your code is that you print the t.i value and do not wait after t.start(), you print the value before the thread increases it.

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The instance variable can be accessed by multiple threads if you let them, for example making it public, or by any other means.

In your code this is what happens: The Tester thread t will access it's own variable, and you will access also that same variable from the main thread. For the moment when you ask it to print the value, it may print any value by which the Testet thread t is at the moment.

When the main thread calls the run method it will execute in the main thread, effectively increasing the value of the field to 1 (as 0 is the default). Afterwards when you call the method start it will start the separate thread and the Java VM will call the method run, then again the field gets incremented, this time from 1 to 2.

So, I would expect that the output is 1 and then, possible 1 or possibly 2 depending on whatever there was time for the thread to execute before you asked to print the value from the main thread.... the exact result you get depends on your machine, in another computer it can be another tale. This depends on the CPU, the operating system, the available memory and other things.

As dash1e suggested in his answer, you can use Thread.sleep(1000); to make the main thread wait while the Tester thread t executes on background. This greatly increases the likelihood that the Tester thread t will have updated the value of the field before the main thread asks for it to print it. That said, I want to left clear that using Thread.sleep(1000); to wait for a task to complete is not good enough by itself... if you want to, you can put a call to Thread.sleep inside a while where you verify if a certain criteria has been met, that's known as an spinning.

The fact that you can print the value of the field form the main thread demostrates that you can access it from another thread. And that is a good thing, because you want your thread to communicate... somehow.

It is ok to access it because it is only an int, and an int cannot be in an invalid state, so there is no need sync the access. Although you may get an not up-to-date value, and it will change on background, so it isn't very reliable.

If you want a value that can only be acceded by a single thread, and that exists idependly for each thread, then take a look to ThreadLocal.

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The main answer that I was looking for was in terms of happens-before: Concept detailed below:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/package-summary.html#MemoryVisibility

So it says in the docs - a) that before a thread starts - all statements prior to it are completed b) all statements in the thread execution are completed at the termination of the new thread.

Going with the above understanding - i should be all the time visible to the new thread started. And this it should be - at all times, on all systems - so when start is called and a new thread is launched then it should always see i as 1.

But, the time we are printing the i value is getting executed by the main thread - not by the Tester thread. So even though the new Tester thread may see the value as 1 and increment it as 2 - the execution in main does not reflect it because i++ is not an atomic operation.

Now suppose we try and make the int as :

 private volatile int i;

volatile guarantees happens-before relationship for not only the specific variable but also statement until it.

The println of main thread that gets executed may get executed before the increment even began. So we may see 11 getting printed, even after making the variable volatile. Similar case exists for making the variable an AtomicInteger.

The run method when invoked will see the incremented value:

System.out.println("i "+  i.incrementAndGet()); 

But not the main thread. Visibility of data in the run method / main method differs. Instance variable used is same for both threads executing.

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ok, now accept your own answer. I resign to continue editing mine. –  Theraot Jun 26 '12 at 4:40
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You have started the thread, but have not wait for it to stop. Use t.join() to wait for finish. And, yes, you have thread synchronization issue, but that's another issue.

public class Tester extends Thread {

    private int i;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Tester t = new Tester();
        t.run();
        System.out.println(t.i);
        t.start();
        t.join();
        System.out.println(t.i);
    }

    public void run() {
        i++;
    }

}
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I your code:

public class Tester extends Thread {

private int i;

public static void main(String[] args){
 Tester t = new Tester();
 t.run();
 System.out.print(t.i);
 t.start();
 System.out.print(t.i);

}

public void run(){ i++;}

}

You call t.run() and t.start(). There are 2 thread are running t.run() thread and t.start() thread.

In that i variable you share between 2 thread that is not synchronous.

Therefore sometime value of i variable is not update between threads. You can synchronous by using volatile keyword

private volatile int i;

Or synchronise code segment increases value of i

public void run(){ 
    synchronized(this){
        i++;
    }
}
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