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I would like to use an initializer lists for object initialization to simplify object management, but the issue is that objects reference each other.

//B::B(A &a) //The only available constructor for B

class AB
{
    A m_a;
    B m_b;

    AB()
        : m_a()
        , m_b(m_a)

    ...
};

Is this allowed by standard? From what I understand, it should be, given that member declaration within class are A, then B, order in initialization list doesn't matter, as they will be initialized by their physical order within class.

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Be careful with your copy constructor and copy assignment operator, too. –  James McNellis Jun 26 '12 at 1:53
    
IIRC, they are not generated if object contains pointers or references? –  Coder Jun 26 '12 at 1:54
3  
@Coder: That is incorrect. –  Ed S. Jun 26 '12 at 1:54
    
I think if the class contains a reference as a member then no compiler generated copy constructor and assignment operators will be available. Isn't that the case? –  madu Jun 26 '12 at 2:08
    
@madu: This is exactly what confused me right now. And yes, since there is no real reference member, the constructors/operators will be generated still, and yes, I guess they have to be explicitly disabled in this case. But if there is a reference/pointer member there should be no auto-generated functions IIRC. –  Coder Jun 26 '12 at 2:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is this allowed by standard? From what I understand, it should be, given that member declaration within class are A, then B, order in initialization list doesn't matter, as they will be initialized by their physical order within class.

Yes, the order of initialization is that of the declaration of the member attributes in the class. Additionally, and depending on what B constructor does, it is correct (although close to the edge) to pass a reference to a yet uninitialized object as long as the reference (or pointer) as long as the reference or pointer is stored, but the object not used.

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