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I wanted to implement a default sort order in my domain class and immediately found it didn't work with the getAll method. No biggie, I just used list instead. The thing is that the default sort order in a domain class does not allow you specify multiple sort fields (as seen here).

My goal is to sort all Foo objects first by the name of their Bar object, then by their own name.

class Foo {
    String name
    String Bar
}

class Bar {
    String name
}

How can I implement this in the domain class so I don't have to specify a long/nasty comparator every time I call .list()?

One of my attempts:

static Comparator getComparator() { 
    def c = { a, b -> 
    def result = a.bar.name.compareTo( b.bar.name ); 
        if ( result == 0 ) {
            result = a.name.compareTo( b.name );
        }
    }
    return c as Comparator
}

Then I could just call Foo.list(Foo.getComparator())... if I could get it to work.

Update:

I think I am really close here, just having trouble with implementing two comparisons in the same sort closure.

Foo.list().sort{ a, b ->
    def result = a.bar.name <=> b.bar.name;
    // Things mess up when I put this if statement in.
    if( result == 0 ) {
        a.name <=> b.name
    }
}

Disco!

class Foo { // My domain class
    // ...

    static Comparator getComparator() {
        def c =[
            compare: { a, b ->
                def result = a.bar.name <=> b.bar.name;
                if( result == 0 ) {
                    result = a.name <=> b.name
                }
                return result
            }
        ] as Comparator
    }

    // ...
}

And implemented like this in my controller:

Foo.list().sort( Foo.getComparator() )

PS:

The above works, but Jeff Storey posted some code in his answer after I discoed, and his code works and is much nicer than mine so use it :)

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Looks like you found your answer, FYI using a.bar.name <=> b.bar.name ?: a.name <=> b.name is idiomatic groovy situations with fallback comparison keys. Also, since these are domain objects, I'd suggest doing your sorting in the DB if you can. Unless the set of them is really small, doing it in groovy will likely be orders of magnitude slower. –  Ted Naleid Jun 26 '12 at 5:45
    
Doing it in the database means HQL via the executeQuery method correct? –  ubiquibacon Jun 26 '12 at 6:06
    
Yes, that's how I'd do it. You could probably also use criteria for this, but I find criteria a lot more awkward to write than HQL which is very close to SQL. –  Ted Naleid Jun 26 '12 at 14:23
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your case, would it make sense to have Foo implement Comparable and the implementation could do the comparison as you described? Then when you sort the objects in a list, because they are Comparable, they will sort properly.

If it does not make sense for you to implement Comparable though, you will need to specify a comparator to sort by.

Here's some sample code based on your comments:

edit:

class Person implements Comparable<Person> {

   String firstName
   String lastName

   int compareTo(Person other) {
       int lastNameCompare = lastName <=> other.lastName
       return lastNameCompare != 0 ? lastNameCompare : firstName <=> other.firstName
   }

   String toString() {
     "${lastName},${firstName}"
   }
}

def people = [new Person(firstName:"John",lastName:"Smith"), new Person(firstName:"Bill",lastName:"Jones"), new Person(firstName:"Adam",lastName:"Smith")]
println "unsorted = ${people}"
println "sorted = ${people.sort()}" 

This prints:

unsorted = [Smith,John, Jones,Bill, Smith,Adam]
sorted = [Jones,Bill, Smith,Adam, Smith,John]
share|improve this answer
    
If I implement the Comparable interface how do I make Grails use it for sorting? I know how to compare two object foo1.compareTo(foo2) but I need to implement this on a list of objects. –  ubiquibacon Jun 26 '12 at 2:40
    
    
Right, I don't think implementing the comparable interface is my issue (though I did try it as you can see by the use of compareTo in "One of my attempts" in my question). I can already do a decent comparison with a closure with a.bar.name <=> b.bar.name. I think most my issues are coming from ordering by two fields at the same time. An easier example to understand, imagine ordering first by last name, then by first name. Thus if there were two people with the last name Smith Adam Smith would come before John Smith. –  ubiquibacon Jun 26 '12 at 2:59
    
Maybe I'm misunderstanding...but I posted some sample code. –  Jeff Storey Jun 26 '12 at 3:43
    
Ah, if your code is correct then THAT is what I was looking for. I didn't realize simply calling .sort() after you had implemented the compareTo() method would actually use the compareTo() method. I'll give this a shot as it is much cleaner than my solution. Thanks! –  ubiquibacon Jun 26 '12 at 6:09
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To further simplify the above post (I would have commented on it but I don't have the rep yet), you can chain the groovy compare operators using the elvis operator:

class Person implements Comparable<Person> {

    String firstName
    String lastName

    int compareTo(Person other) {
        return lastName <=> other.lastName ?: firstName <=> other.firstName
    }

    String toString() {
        "${lastName},${firstName}"
    }
}

def people = [new Person(firstName:"John",lastName:"Smith"), new Person(firstName:"Bill",lastName:"Jones"), new     Person(firstName:"Adam",lastName:"Smith")]
println "unsorted = ${people}"
println "sorted = ${people.sort()}"

This will give you the same result because 0 is considered false in groovy's eyes, which will make it look at the next conditional in the chain.

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