Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, I have the following (kludgy!) code for an infix to postfix expression converter and calculator (as I mentioned on my previous post: Simple numerical expression solver, thanks to everyone!):

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <stack>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    stack<char> operators;  
    stack<char> output;
    stack<char> temp;       
    stack<char> answer; 

    string command;

    cout << "=>";
    cin >> command;

    // "Shunting Yard" algorithm
    // source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shunting-yard_algorithm
    for(int i=0; i<command.size(); i++)
    {
        switch(command[i])
        {
        case '*': case '+': case '-': case '/': case'(': 
            operators.push(command[i]);
            break;

        case ')':
            while(operators.top() != '(')
            {
                output.push(operators.top());
                operators.pop();
            }
            operators.pop();
            break;

        default:
            output.push(command[i]);
            break;
        }
    }

    while(!operators.empty())
    {
        output.push(operators.top());
        operators.pop();
    }

    while(!output.empty())
    {
        temp.push(output.top());
        output.pop();
    }

    while(!temp.empty())
    {
        if(temp.top() == '+')
        {
            int a = atoi(&answer.top());
            cout << "A=" << a << endl;
            answer.pop();
            int b = atoi(&answer.top());
            cout << "B=" << b << endl;
            answer.pop();
            answer.push(b+a);
        } else {
            answer.push(temp.top());
        }
        temp.pop();
    }

    cout << answer.top() << endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}    

Anyway, the problem is: if I enter, for instance, 3+4, the result is "&", when the correct result would be "7". So, what's wrong with my code?

share|improve this question
    
What's supposed to happen if you add, say, 6+7? A naive implementation will give '=', which is probably not what you want… but what do you want? Roll over to 3, peg at 9, use base-36 and print 'C'? –  abarnert Jun 26 '12 at 4:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There are two problems here.

First:

int a = atoi(&answer.top());

atoi takes a pointer to a null-terminated string of characters. But &answer.top() is just a pointer to a single character. So atoi is going to start reading from that character, then continue marching through memory until it finds a '\0' character (or a non-digit). Depending on how the stack is implemented on your platform, that may mean it reads the '4', then the '3', then a '\0', so it ends up with "43". Or it may read the '4', then some uninitialized memory that happens to start with "8675309j", so it ends up with "48675309".

In case you're wondering why the compiler doesn't warn you about this error, the problem is that C-style strings and pointers to single characters are syntactically the exact same type (char*), so a compiler can't tell you're mixing them up unless it understands the semantics of atoi. This is one of the many reasons that it's better to use the C++ string class and functions, instead of the C char* based functions.

Second:

answer.push(b+a);

b+a is an int, but you're pushing it into a stack of chars. So, even if it had the right value, you'd be pushing the character '\007', not the character '7'. You need to re-stringize it. But in this case, you've apparently got something like, say, 305419814, which is truncated to the low 8 bits (38) when cast to char, and 38 is '&'.

share|improve this answer

Replacing this section of code:

if(temp.top() == '+')
    {
        int a = atoi(&answer.top());
        cout << "A=" << a << endl;
        answer.pop();
        int b = atoi(&answer.top());
        cout << "B=" << b << endl;
        answer.pop();
        answer.push(b+a);
    } 

with:

 if(temp.top() == '+')
    {
        int a = answer.top() - '0';
        cout << "A=" << a << endl;
        answer.pop();
        int b = answer.top() - '0';
        cout << "B=" << b << endl;
        answer.pop();
        answer.push(b+a);
    } 

will solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
It works! But now seems like I can't push (b+a) into the stack (it's empty). Any help on that? –  segfaultd Jun 26 '12 at 3:45
    
This won't work. If the stack has '4' and '3', you're going to end up with a=4, b=3, a+b=7, and push '\007', not '7'. –  abarnert Jun 26 '12 at 4:39
    
@danielpontello: While this code doesn't actually work, your question doesn't make much sense. There shouldn't be any problem with pushing onto an empty stack. What's the exact error you're getting? –  abarnert Jun 26 '12 at 4:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.