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I'm building a scripting language in Java for a game, and I'm currently working on the parser. The language is to be utilized by players/modders/myself to create custom spells and effects. However, I'm having difficulty imagining how to smoothly implement static typing in the current system (a painful necessity driven by performance needs). I don't care so much if compilation is fast, but actual execution needs to be as fast as I can get it (within reason, at least. I'm hoping to get this done pretty soon.)

So the parser has next() and peek() methods to iterate through the stream of tokens. It's currently built of a hierarchy methods that call each other in a fashion that preserves type precedence (the "bottom-most" method returning a constant, variable, etc). Each method returns an IResolve that has a generic type <T> it "resolves" to. For example, here's a method that handles "or" expressions, with "and" being more tightly coupled:

protected final IResolve checkGrammar_Or() throws ParseException
{
    IResolve left = checkGrammar_And();

    if (left == null)
        return null;

    if (peek().type != TokenType.IDENTIFIER || !"or".equals((String)peek().value))
        return left;

    next();

    IResolve right = checkGrammar_Or();

    if (right == null)
        throwExpressionException();

    return new BinaryOperation(left, right, new LogicOr());
}

The problem is when I need to implement a function that depends on the type. As you probably noticed, the generic type isn't being specified by the parser, and is part of the design problem. In this function, I was hoping to do something like the following (though this wouldn't work due to generic types' erasure...)

protected final IResolve checkGrammar_Comparison() throws ParseException
{
    IResolve left = checkGrammer_Term();

    if (left == null)
        return null;

    IBinaryOperationType op;

    switch (peek().type)
    {
    default:
        return left;

    case LOGIC_LT:

        //This ain't gonna work because of erasure
        if (left instanceof IResolve<Double>)
            op = new LogicLessThanDouble();

        break;

    //And the same for these
    case LOGIC_LT_OR_EQUAL:
    case LOGIC_GT:
    case LOGIC_GT_OR_EQUAL:
    }

    next();

    IResolve right = checkGrammar_Comparison();

    if (right == null)
        throwExpressionException();

    return new BinaryOperation(left, right, op);
}

The problem spot, where I'm wishing I could make the connection, is in the switch statement. I'm already certain I'll need to make IResolve non-generic and give it a "getType()" method that returns an int or something, especially if I want to support user-defined classes in the future.

The question is:

What's the best way to achieve static typing given my current structure and the desire for mixed inheritance (user-defined classes and interfaces, like Java and C#)? If there is no good way, how can I alter or even rebuild my structure to achieve it?

Note: I don't claim to have any idea what I've gotten myself into, constructive criticism is more than welcome. If I need to clarify anything, let me know!

Another note: I know you're thinking "Why static typing?", and normally I'd agree with you-- however, the game world is composed of voxels (it's a Minecraft mod to be precise) and working with them needs to be fast. Imagine a script that's a O(n^2) algorithm iterating over 100 blocks twenty times a second, for 30+ players on a cheap server that's already barely squeaking by... or, a single, massive explosion effecting thousands of blocks, inevitably causing a horrendous lag spike. Hence, backend type checking or any form of duck-typing ain't gonna cut it (though I'm desperately aching for it atm.) The low level benefits are a necessity in this particular case, painful though it is.

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1  
Good lord, it feels like rewriting Java itself. Why would you do this to yourself? I could see wanting a game DSL, but redoing all that object-oriented stuff with interfaces, classes, etc.? I don't see why. –  duffymo Jun 26 '12 at 4:37
    
Well, the decision was motivated by the desire for security (the existing user base consists of hundreds of thousands of kids), flexibility, ease of use, and uh, me having fun. I looked into just using Javascript, but there didn't seem to be a way to limit the script's ability... The object-oriented-ness could be spared, really, though it'd be nice. The static typing is the one thing giving me grief, and I need it for efficiency's sake (the gameworld works with voxels.) –  Philip Jun 26 '12 at 4:43
    
I think static typing is overrated. JavaScript does just fine without it; so do other languages. I wouldn't want to invent a new language, unless you're having fun and just want to give it a try. –  duffymo Jun 26 '12 at 4:47
1  
Any reason you are hand writing a parser, rather than using something like Antlr? –  xxpor Jun 26 '12 at 4:55
1  
I'd suggest to choose any existing scripting language that has mature IDE, eventually you will need a debug, and code sugar to make your iteration algorithms painless. Don't want to be annoying but take a look at Groovy –  Viktor Stolbin Jun 26 '12 at 5:40

2 Answers 2

You can get the best of both worlds by adding a method Class<T> getType() to IResolve; its implementers should simply return the appropriate Class object. (If the implementers themselves are generic, you need to get a reference to that object in the constructor or something.)

You can then do left.getType().equals(Double.class), etc.

This is entirely separate from the question of whether you should build your own parser with static typing, which is very much worth asking.

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I appreciate the answer :) It wouldn't support an inheritance system (unless you could instantiate classes via reflection, which I'm pretty sure Java disallows), but it'll work if that solution happens to be too nutty to implement. I understand the cynicism, but I gotta have the static typing. As for parser generation, I haven't been able to find one that supports aforementioned static typing, along with no external libraries and such (unless I don't know what I'm looking for, which is always a possibility) –  Philip Jun 26 '12 at 6:10
    
You wouldn't normally put the type checker in the parser. The parser generates an abstract syntax tree; you then check the AST for type correctness with a type-checking algorithm. (The only such algorithm I'm familiar with is Hindley–Milner; I don't know what Java uses.) –  Taymon Jun 26 '12 at 18:17
    
Also, just to be clear, by "implementers" I meant "your classes that implement the IResolve interface". And Java does, in fact, allow you to instantiate classes via reflection. –  Taymon Jun 26 '12 at 18:21
    
Er, let me rephrase: Java allows you to instantiate instances of classes via reflection, but not create actual classes themselves, as far as I've been able to discern. –  Philip Jun 26 '12 at 19:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The solution I'm going with, as some have suggested in the comments, was to separate parsing and typing into separate phases, along with using an enum to represent type as I originally felt I should.

While I appreciate Taymon's answer, I can't use it if I hope to support user defined classes in the future.

If someone has a better solution, I'd be more than happy to accept it!

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