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#include<iostream>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdio.h>

using namespace std;

union type{
            int a;
            char b;
            int *p;
            char *s;
            int arr[10];
};

int fn(union type *exp){

    exp->p = exp->p+1;
    cout << *(exp->p);
    cout << "\n";
return 0;
}

int main(){

    union type *str;
    str->a = 10;
    str->b = 'n';
    str->p = &(str->a);
    cout << (str->p);
    cout << "\n";
    fn(str);
    cout << str->p;
    cout << "\n";
return 0;
}

This code is giving me segmentation fault. Is it because i need to allocate memory to the union explicitly using malloc?? I am new to coding and trying to learn c++.

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4  
Trying to learn C++ by using malloc and weird, pointless unions won't get you far. There's a list of good books in the FAQ that will. –  chris Jun 26 '12 at 4:20
    
Is there any reason str has to be a pointer to a type, instead of just a type? If you just remove the * and change every -> into a ., everything will work. (Well, in the fn prototype you might want to turn the * into a & instead of removing it.) –  abarnert Jun 26 '12 at 4:21
    
Also, even if you do malloc str (or replace it with a non-pointer), fn(str) is going to fail (but probably not segfault, unless you're lucky). You set str->p to a pointer to str itself, then increment it, so it's now pointing sizeof(int) bytes past str, which is either the middle of str, or whatever object comes after str in memory, or uninitialized memory, none of which are things you probably want to print as an int. –  abarnert Jun 26 '12 at 4:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This code is giving me segmentation fault. Is it because i need to allocate memory to the union explicitly using malloc??

Right. Your str pointer isn't pointing to valid memory location, it even not initialized. So, before writing str->a you need to set str to something.

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i added this piece to the code and it works: str = (union type *)malloc(sizeof(type)); –  newbie555 Jun 26 '12 at 4:23

You are declaring a pointer to a union, but the pointer is not pointing to any valid memory, which you need to either malloc/new. What it is pointing to is undefined (garbage pointer).

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