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I need to load and use CSV file data in C++. At this point it can really just be a comma-delimited parser (ie don't worry about escaping new lines and commas). The main need is a line-by-line parser that will return a vector for the next line each time the method is called.

I found this article which looks quite promising: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_35_0/libs/spirit/example/fundamental/list_parser.cpp

I've never used Boost's Spirit, but am willing to try it. But only if there isn't a more straightforward solution I'm overlooking.

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6  
I have looked at boost::spirit for parsing. It is more for parsing grammars thank parsing a simple file format. Someone on my team was trying to use it to parse XML and it was a pain to debug. Stay away from boost::spirit if possible. –  chrish Jul 13 '09 at 19:30
37  
Sorry chrish, but that's terrible advice. Spirit isn't always an appropriate solution but I've used it - and continue to use it - successfully in a number of projects. Compared to similar tools (Antlr, Lex/yacc etc) it has significant advantages. Now, for parsing CSV it's probably overkill... –  MattyT Jul 14 '09 at 12:09
1  
@MattyT IMHO spirit is pretty hard to use for a parser combinator library. Having had some (very pleasant) experience with Haskells (atto)parsec libraries I expected it (spirit) to work similarly well, but gave up on it after fighting with 600 line compiler errors. –  Florian Jul 14 at 13:24
    

19 Answers 19

up vote 87 down vote accepted

If you don't care about escaping comma and newline,
AND you can't embed comma and newline in quotes (If you can't escape then...)
then its only about three lines of code (OK 14 ->But its only 15 to read the whole file).

std::vector<std::string> getNextLineAndSplitIntoTokens(std::istream& str)
{
    std::vector<std::string>   result;
    std::string                line;
    std::getline(str,line);

    std::stringstream          lineStream(line);
    std::string                cell;

    while(std::getline(lineStream,cell,','))
    {
        result.push_back(cell);
    }
    return result;
}

I would just create a class representing a row.
Then stream into that object:

#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

class CSVRow
{
    public:
        std::string const& operator[](std::size_t index) const
        {
            return m_data[index];
        }
        std::size_t size() const
        {
            return m_data.size();
        }
        void readNextRow(std::istream& str)
        {
            std::string         line;
            std::getline(str,line);

            std::stringstream   lineStream(line);
            std::string         cell;

            m_data.clear();
            while(std::getline(lineStream,cell,','))
            {
                m_data.push_back(cell);
            }
        }
    private:
        std::vector<std::string>    m_data;
};

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& str,CSVRow& data)
{
    data.readNextRow(str);
    return str;
}   
int main()
{
    std::ifstream       file("plop.csv");

    CSVRow              row;
    while(file >> row)
    {
        std::cout << "4th Element(" << row[3] << ")\n";
    }
}

But with a little work we could technically create an iterator:

class CSVIterator
{   
    public:
        typedef std::input_iterator_tag     iterator_category;
        typedef CSVRow                      value_type;
        typedef std::size_t                 difference_type;
        typedef CSVRow*                     pointer;
        typedef CSVRow&                     reference;

        CSVIterator(std::istream& str)  :m_str(str.good()?&str:NULL) { ++(*this); }
        CSVIterator()                   :m_str(NULL) {}

        // Pre Increment
        CSVIterator& operator++()               {if (m_str) { (*m_str) >> m_row;m_str = m_str->good()?m_str:NULL;}return *this;}
        // Post increment
        CSVIterator operator++(int)             {CSVIterator    tmp(*this);++(*this);return tmp;}
        CSVRow const& operator*()   const       {return m_row;}
        CSVRow const* operator->()  const       {return &m_row;}

        bool operator==(CSVIterator const& rhs) {return ((this == &rhs) || ((this->m_str == NULL) && (rhs.m_str == NULL)));}
        bool operator!=(CSVIterator const& rhs) {return !((*this) == rhs);}
    private:
        std::istream*       m_str;
        CSVRow              m_row;
};


int main()
{
    std::ifstream       file("plop.csv");

    for(CSVIterator loop(file);loop != CSVIterator();++loop)
    {
        std::cout << "4th Element(" << (*loop)[3] << ")\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
first() next(). What is this Java! Only Joking. –  Loki Astari Jul 14 '09 at 5:15
1  
or you could use some boost libraries to parse csv ... see below –  stefanB Mar 21 '10 at 0:15
1  
This code just saved me hours. I don't usually use C++, but needed to resort to it to write a quick parser. This is a great boilerplate, and the code even compiles. –  conradlee May 18 '11 at 13:34
1  
@DarthVader: An overlay broad statement that by its broadness is silly. If you would like to clarify why it is bad and then why this badness applies in this context. –  Loki Astari Jan 12 '12 at 20:10
6  
@DarthVader: I think it is silly to make broad generalizations. The code above works correctly so I can actually see anything wrong with it. But if you have any specific comment on the above I will definitely consider in in this context. But I can see how you can come to that conclusion by mindlessly following a set of generalized rules for C# and applying it to another language. –  Loki Astari Jan 12 '12 at 21:29

Solution using Boost Tokenizer:

std::vector<std::string> vec;
using namespace boost;
tokenizer<escaped_list_separator<char> > tk(
   line, escaped_list_separator<char>('\\', ',', '\"'));
for (tokenizer<escaped_list_separator<char> >::iterator i(tk.begin());
   i!=tk.end();++i) 
{
   vec.push_back(*i);
}
share|improve this answer
6  
The boost tokenizer doesn't fully support the complete CSV standard, but there are some quick workarounds. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1120140/csv-parser-in-c/… –  Rolf Kristensen Apr 13 '10 at 23:03
2  
Do you have to have the whole boost library on your machine, or can you just use a subset of their code to do this? 256mb seems like a lot for CSV parsing.. –  NPike Apr 27 '11 at 23:28
4  
@NPike : You can use the bcp utility that comes with boost to extract only the headers you actually need. –  ildjarn May 24 '11 at 23:06

The C++ String Toolkit Library (StrTk) has a token grid class that allows you to load data either from text files, strings or char buffers, and to parse/process them in a row-column fashion.

You can specify the row delimiters and column delimiters or just use the defaults.

void foo()
{
   std::string data = "1,2,3,4,5\n"
                      "0,2,4,6,8\n"
                      "1,3,5,7,9\n";

   strtk::token_grid grid(data,data.size(),",");

   for(std::size_t i = 0; i < grid.row_count(); ++i)
   {
      strtk::token_grid::row_type r = grid.row(i);
      for(std::size_t j = 0; j < r.size(); ++j)
      {
         std::cout << r.get<int>(j) << "\t";
      }
      std::cout << std::endl;
   }
   std::cout << std::endl;
}

More examples can be found Here

share|improve this answer

It is not overkill to use Spirit for parsing CSVs. Spirit is well suited for micro-parsing tasks. For instance, with Spirit 2.1, it is as easy as:

bool r = phrase_parse(first, last,

    //  Begin grammar
    (
        double_ % ','
    )
    ,
    //  End grammar

    space, v);

The vector, v, gets stuffed with the values. There is a series of tutorials touching on this in the new Spirit 2.1 docs that's just been released with Boost 1.41.

The tutorial progresses from simple to complex. The CSV parsers are presented somewhere in the middle and touches on various techniques in using Spirit. The generated code is as tight as hand written code. Check out the assembler generated!

share|improve this answer
7  
Actually it is overkill, the compilation time hit is enormous and makes using Spirit for simple "micro-parsing tasks" unreasonable. –  Gerdiner Dec 2 '12 at 0:37
5  
Also I'd like to point out that the code above does not parse CSV, it just parses a range of the type of the vector delimited by commas. It doesn't handle quotes, varying types of columns etc. In short 19 votes for something that does answer the question at all seems a bit suspicious to me. –  Gerdiner Dec 2 '12 at 0:40
3  
@Gerdiner Nonsense. The compilation time hit for small parsers isn’t that big, but it’s also irrelevant because you stuff the code into its own compilation unit and compile it once. Then you only need to link it and that’s as efficient as it gets. And as for your other comment, there are as many dialects of CSV as there are processors for it. This one certainly isn’t a very useful dialect but it can be trivially extended to handle quoted values. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 6 '12 at 12:04
4  
@konrad: Simply including "#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>" in an empty file with only a main and nothing else takes 9.7sec with MSVC 2012 on a corei7 running at 2.ghz. It's needless bloat. The accepted answer compiles in under 2secs on the same machine, I'd hate to imagine how long the 'proper' Boost.Spirit example would take to compile. –  Gerdiner Jan 11 '13 at 0:31
3  
@Gerdiner I have to agree with you the overhead in using spirit for something as simple as cvs processing is far too great. –  Gilly Radnore Feb 25 at 0:48

You can use Boost Tokenizer with escaped_list_separator.

escaped_list_separator parses a superset of the csv. Boost::tokenizer

This only uses Boost tokenizer header files, no linking to boost libraries required.

Here is an example, (see Parse CSV File With Boost Tokenizer In C++ for details or Boost::tokenizer ):

#include <iostream>     // cout, endl
#include <fstream>      // fstream
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>    // copy
#include <iterator>     // ostream_operator
#include <boost/tokenizer.hpp>

int main()
{
    using namespace std;
    using namespace boost;
    string data("data.csv");

    ifstream in(data.c_str());
    if (!in.is_open()) return 1;

    typedef tokenizer< escaped_list_separator<char> > Tokenizer;
    vector< string > vec;
    string line;

    while (getline(in,line))
    {
        Tokenizer tok(line);
        vec.assign(tok.begin(),tok.end());

        // vector now contains strings from one row, output to cout here
        copy(vec.begin(), vec.end(), ostream_iterator<string>(cout, "|"));

        cout << "\n----------------------" << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
And if you want to be able to parse embedded new lines mybyteofcode.blogspot.com/2010/11/…. –  stefanB Jan 12 '11 at 22:35
    
While this technique works, I have found it to have very poor performance. Parsing a 90000 line CSV file with ten fields per line takes around 8 seconds on my 2 GHz Xeon. The Python Standard Library csv module parses the same file in about 0.3 seconds. –  Rob Smallshire Jun 27 '12 at 7:59
    
@Rob that's interesting - what does the Python csv do differently? –  tofutim Jul 12 '12 at 5:48
    
@RobSmallshire it's a simple example code not a high performance one. This code makes copies of all the fields per line. For higher performance you would use different options and return just references to fields in buffer instead of making copies. –  stefanB Jul 16 '12 at 0:43

When using the Boost Tokenizer escaped_list_separator for CSV files, then one should be aware of the following:

  1. It requires an escape-character (default back-slash - \)
  2. It requires a splitter/seperator-character (default comma - ,)
  3. It requires an quote-character (default quote - ")

The CSV format specified by wiki states that data fields can contain separators in quotes (supported):

1997,Ford,E350,"Super, luxurious truck"

The CSV format specified by wiki states that single quotes should be handled with double-quotes (escaped_list_separator will strip away all quote characters):

1997,Ford,E350,"Super ""luxurious"" truck"

The CSV format doesn't specify that any back-slash characters should be stripped away (escaped_list_separator will strip away all escape characters).

A possible work-around to fix the default behavior of the boost escaped_list_separator:

  1. First replace all back-slash characters (\) with two back-slash characters (\\) so they are not stripped away.
  2. Secondly replace all double-quotes ("") with a single back-slash character and a quote (\")

This work-around has the side-effect that empty data-fields that are represented by a double-quote, will be transformed into a single-quote-token. When iterating through the tokens, then one must check if the token is a single-quote, and treat it like an empty string.

Not pretty but it works, as long there are not newlines within the quotes.

share|improve this answer

If you DO care about parsing CSV correctly, this will do it...relatively slowly as it works one char at a time.

 void ParseCSV(const string& csvSource, vector<vector<string> >& lines)
    {
       bool inQuote(false);
       bool newLine(false);
       string field;
       lines.clear();
       vector<string> line;

       string::const_iterator aChar = csvSource.begin();
       while (aChar != csvSource.end())
       {
          switch (*aChar)
          {
          case '"':
             newLine = false;
             inQuote = !inQuote;
             break;

          case ',':
             newLine = false;
             if (inQuote == true)
             {
                field += *aChar;
             }
             else
             {
                line.push_back(field);
                field.clear();
             }
             break;

          case '\n':
          case '\r':
             if (inQuote == true)
             {
                field += *aChar;
             }
             else
             {
                if (newLine == false)
                {
                   line.push_back(field);
                   lines.push_back(line);
                   field.clear();
                   line.clear();
                   newLine = true;
                }
             }
             break;

          default:
             newLine = false;
             field.push_back(*aChar);
             break;
          }

          aChar++;
       }

       if (field.size())
          line.push_back(field);

       if (line.size())
          lines.push_back(line);
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Seems the code is missing a line where lastCharWasAQuote is set to true. –  Rolf Kristensen May 27 '11 at 20:57
2  
@Rolf I fixed the bugs with the code, hopefully it passes review. –  unixman83 Dec 4 '11 at 2:36
    
AFAICT this won't handle embedded quote marks correctly (e.g. "This string has ""embedded quote marks""","foo",1)) –  Jeremy Friesner Jun 19 at 0:42
8  

You might want to look at my FOSS project CSVfix, which is a CSV stream editor written in C++. The CSV parser is no prize, but does the job and the whole package may do what you need without you writing any code.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems great ... What about the status beta / production ? –  neuro Jul 13 '09 at 15:30
    
The status is "in development", as suggested by the version numbers. I really need more feed back from users before going to version 1.0. Plus I have a couple more features I want to add, to do with XML production from CSV. –  anon Jul 13 '09 at 15:36
    
Bookmarking it, and will give it a try next time I have to deal with those wonderful standard CSV files ... –  neuro Jul 13 '09 at 15:44
    
+1 I found a project I can learn from :) –  AraK Sep 25 '09 at 2:27

You could also take a look at capabilities of Qt library.

It has regular expressions support and QString class has nice methods, e.g. split() returning QStringList, list of strings obtained by splitting the original string with a provided delimiter. Should suffice for csv file..

To get a column with a given header name I use following: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/970330/c-inheritance-qt-problem-qstring/1011601#1011601

share|improve this answer

As all the CSV questions seem to get redirected here, I thought I'd post my answer here. This answer does not directly address the asker's question. I wanted to be able to read in a stream that is known to be in CSV format, and also the types of each field was already known. Of course, the method below could be used to treat every field to be a string type.

As an example of how I wanted to be able to use a CSV input stream, consider the following input (taken from wikipedia's page on CSV):

const char input[] =
"Year,Make,Model,Description,Price\n"
"1997,Ford,E350,\"ac, abs, moon\",3000.00\n"
"1999,Chevy,\"Venture \"\"Extended Edition\"\"\",\"\",4900.00\n"
"1999,Chevy,\"Venture \"\"Extended Edition, Very Large\"\"\",\"\",5000.00\n"
"1996,Jeep,Grand Cherokee,\"MUST SELL!\n\
air, moon roof, loaded\",4799.00\n"
;

Then, I wanted to be able to read in the data like this:

std::istringstream ss(input);
std::string title[5];
int year;
std::string make, model, desc;
float price;
csv_istream(ss)
    >> title[0] >> title[1] >> title[2] >> title[3] >> title[4];
while (csv_istream(ss)
       >> year >> make >> model >> desc >> price) {
    //...do something with the record...
}

This was the solution I ended up with.

struct csv_istream {
    std::istream &is_;
    csv_istream (std::istream &is) : is_(is) {}
    void scan_ws () const {
        while (is_.good()) {
            int c = is_.peek();
            if (c != ' ' && c != '\t') break;
            is_.get();
        }
    }
    void scan (std::string *s = 0) const {
        std::string ws;
        int c = is_.get();
        if (is_.good()) {
            do {
                if (c == ',' || c == '\n') break;
                if (s) {
                    ws += c;
                    if (c != ' ' && c != '\t') {
                        *s += ws;
                        ws.clear();
                    }
                }
                c = is_.get();
            } while (is_.good());
            if (is_.eof()) is_.clear();
        }
    }
    template <typename T, bool> struct set_value {
        void operator () (std::string in, T &v) const {
            std::istringstream(in) >> v;
        }
    };
    template <typename T> struct set_value<T, true> {
        template <bool SIGNED> void convert (std::string in, T &v) const {
            if (SIGNED) v = ::strtoll(in.c_str(), 0, 0);
            else v = ::strtoull(in.c_str(), 0, 0);
        }
        void operator () (std::string in, T &v) const {
            convert<is_signed_int<T>::val>(in, v);
        }
    };
    template <typename T> const csv_istream & operator >> (T &v) const {
        std::string tmp;
        scan(&tmp);
        set_value<T, is_int<T>::val>()(tmp, v);
        return *this;
    }
    const csv_istream & operator >> (std::string &v) const {
        v.clear();
        scan_ws();
        if (is_.peek() != '"') scan(&v);
        else {
            std::string tmp;
            is_.get();
            std::getline(is_, tmp, '"');
            while (is_.peek() == '"') {
                v += tmp;
                v += is_.get();
                std::getline(is_, tmp, '"');
            }
            v += tmp;
            scan();
        }
        return *this;
    }
    template <typename T>
    const csv_istream & operator >> (T &(*manip)(T &)) const {
        is_ >> manip;
        return *this;
    }
    operator bool () const { return !is_.fail(); }
};

With the following helpers that may be simplified by the new integral traits templates in C++11:

template <typename T> struct is_signed_int { enum { val = false }; };
template <> struct is_signed_int<short> { enum { val = true}; };
template <> struct is_signed_int<int> { enum { val = true}; };
template <> struct is_signed_int<long> { enum { val = true}; };
template <> struct is_signed_int<long long> { enum { val = true}; };

template <typename T> struct is_unsigned_int { enum { val = false }; };
template <> struct is_unsigned_int<unsigned short> { enum { val = true}; };
template <> struct is_unsigned_int<unsigned int> { enum { val = true}; };
template <> struct is_unsigned_int<unsigned long> { enum { val = true}; };
template <> struct is_unsigned_int<unsigned long long> { enum { val = true}; };

template <typename T> struct is_int {
    enum { val = (is_signed_int<T>::val || is_unsigned_int<T>::val) };
};
share|improve this answer
    
Link to the code in action: ideone.com/DFjJE –  jxh Aug 29 '12 at 1:00

Here is code for reading a matrix, note you also have a csvwrite function in matlab

void loadFromCSV( const std::string& filename )
{
    std::ifstream       file( filename.c_str() );
    std::vector< std::vector<std::string> >   matrix;
    std::vector<std::string>   row;
    std::string                line;
    std::string                cell;

    while( file )
    {
        std::getline(file,line);
        std::stringstream lineStream(line);
        row.clear();

        while( std::getline( lineStream, cell, ',' ) )
            row.push_back( cell );

        if( !row.empty() )
            matrix.push_back( row );
    }

    for( int i=0; i<int(matrix.size()); i++ )
    {
        for( int j=0; j<int(matrix[i].size()); j++ )
            std::cout << matrix[i][j] << " ";

        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Excuse me, but this all seems like a great deal of elaborate syntax to hide a few lines of code.

Why not this:

/**

  Read line from a CSV file

  @param[in] fp file pointer to open file
  @param[in] vls reference to vector of strings to hold next line

  */
void readCSV( FILE *fp, std::vector<std::string>& vls )
{
    vls.clear();
    if( ! fp )
    	return;
    char buf[10000];
    if( ! fgets( buf,999,fp) )
    	return;
    std::string s = buf;
    int p,q;
    q = -1;
    // loop over columns
    while( 1 ) {
    	p = q;
    	q = s.find_first_of(",\n",p+1);
    	if( q == -1 ) 
    		break;
    	vls.push_back( s.substr(p+1,q-p-1) );
    }
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::vector<std::string> vls;
    FILE * fp = fopen( argv[1], "r" );
    if( ! fp )
    	return 1;
    readCSV( fp, vls );
    readCSV( fp, vls );
    readCSV( fp, vls );
    std::cout << "row 3, col 4 is " << vls[3].c_str() << "\n";

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

If you don't want to deal with including boost in your project (it is considerably large if all you are going to use it for is CSV parsing...)

I have had luck with the CSV parsing here:

http://www.zedwood.com/article/112/cpp-csv-parser

It handles quoted fields - but does not handle inline \n characters (which is probably fine for most uses).

share|improve this answer
1  
Shouldn't the compiler strip out everything that is non-essential? –  tofutim Jul 12 '12 at 5:46

Another CSV I/O library can be found here:

http://code.google.com/p/fast-cpp-csv-parser/

#include "csv.h"

int main(){
  io::CSVReader<3> in("ram.csv");
  in.read_header(io::ignore_extra_column, "vendor", "size", "speed");
  std::string vendor; int size; double speed;
  while(in.read_row(vendor, size, speed)){
    // do stuff with the data
  }
}
share|improve this answer

This is an old thread but its still at the top of search results, so I'm adding my solution using std::stringstream and a simple string replace method by Yves Baumes I found here.

The following example will read a file line by line, ignore comment lines starting with // and parse the other lines into a combination of strings, ints and doubles. Stringstream does the parsing, but expects fields to be delimited by whitespace, so I use stringreplace to turn commas into spaces first. It handles tabs ok, but doesn't deal with quoted strings.

Bad or missing input is simply ignored, which may or may not be good, depending on your circumstance.

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <fstream>

void StringReplace(std::string& str, const std::string& oldStr, const std::string& newStr)
// code by  Yves Baumes
// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1494399/how-do-i-search-find-and-replace-in-a-standard-string
{
  size_t pos = 0;
  while((pos = str.find(oldStr, pos)) != std::string::npos)
  {
     str.replace(pos, oldStr.length(), newStr);
     pos += newStr.length();
  }
}

void LoadCSV(std::string &filename) {
   std::ifstream stream(filename);
   std::string in_line;
   std::string Field;
   std::string Chan;
   int ChanType;
   double Scale;
   int Import;
   while (std::getline(stream, in_line)) {
      StringReplace(in_line, ",", " ");
      std::stringstream line(in_line);
      line >> Field >> Chan >> ChanType >> Scale >> Import;
      if (Field.substr(0,2)!="//") {
         // do your stuff 
         // this is CBuilder code for demonstration, sorry
         ShowMessage((String)Field.c_str() + "\n" + Chan.c_str() + "\n" + IntToStr(ChanType) + "\n" +FloatToStr(Scale) + "\n" +IntToStr(Import));
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer

For what it is worth, here is my implementation. It deals with wstring input, but could be adjusted to string easily. It does not handle newline in fields (as my application does not either, but adding its support isn't too difficult) and it does not comply with "\r\n" end of line as per RFC (assuming you use std::getline), but it does handle whitespace trimming and double-quotes correctly (hopefully).

using namespace std;

// trim whitespaces around field or double-quotes, remove double-quotes and replace escaped double-quotes (double double-quotes)
wstring trimquote(const wstring& str, const wstring& whitespace, const wchar_t quotChar)
{
    wstring ws;
    wstring::size_type strBegin = str.find_first_not_of(whitespace);
    if (strBegin == wstring::npos)
        return L"";

    wstring::size_type strEnd = str.find_last_not_of(whitespace);
    wstring::size_type strRange = strEnd - strBegin + 1;

    if((str[strBegin] == quotChar) && (str[strEnd] == quotChar))
    {
        ws = str.substr(strBegin+1, strRange-2);
        strBegin = 0;
        while((strEnd = ws.find(quotChar, strBegin)) != wstring::npos)
        {
            ws.erase(strEnd, 1);
            strBegin = strEnd+1;
        }

    }
    else
        ws = str.substr(strBegin, strRange);
    return ws;
}

pair<unsigned, unsigned> nextCSVQuotePair(const wstring& line, const wchar_t quotChar, unsigned ofs = 0)
{
    pair<unsigned, unsigned> r;
    r.first = line.find(quotChar, ofs);
    r.second = wstring::npos;
    if(r.first != wstring::npos)
    {
        r.second = r.first;
        while(((r.second = line.find(quotChar, r.second+1)) != wstring::npos)
            && (line[r.second+1] == quotChar)) // WARNING: assumes null-terminated string such that line[r.second+1] always exist
            r.second++;

    }
    return r;
}

unsigned parseLine(vector<wstring>& fields, const wstring& line)
{
    unsigned ofs, ofs0, np;
    const wchar_t delim = L',';
    const wstring whitespace = L" \t\xa0\x3000\x2000\x2001\x2002\x2003\x2004\x2005\x2006\x2007\x2008\x2009\x200a\x202f\x205f";
    const wchar_t quotChar = L'\"';
    pair<unsigned, unsigned> quot;

    fields.clear();

    ofs = ofs0 = 0;
    quot = nextCSVQuotePair(line, quotChar);
    while((np = line.find(delim, ofs)) != wstring::npos)
    {
        if((np > quot.first) && (np < quot.second))
        { // skip delimiter inside quoted field
            ofs = quot.second+1;
            quot = nextCSVQuotePair(line, quotChar, ofs);
            continue;
        }
        fields.push_back( trimquote(line.substr(ofs0, np-ofs0), whitespace, quotChar) );
        ofs = ofs0 = np+1;
    }
    fields.push_back( trimquote(line.substr(ofs0), whitespace, quotChar) );

    return fields.size();
}
share|improve this answer

Here is another implementation of a Unicode CSV parser (works with wchar_t). I wrote part of it, while Jonathan Leffler wrote the rest.

Note: This parser is aimed at replicating Excel's behavior as closely as possible, specifically when importing broken or malformed CSV files.

This is the original question - Parsing CSV file with multiline fields and escaped double quotes

This is the code as a SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example).

#include <stdbool.h>
#include <wchar.h>
#include <wctype.h>

extern const wchar_t *nextCsvField(const wchar_t *p, wchar_t sep, bool *newline);

// Returns a pointer to the start of the next field,
// or zero if this is the last field in the CSV
// p is the start position of the field
// sep is the separator used, i.e. comma or semicolon
// newline says whether the field ends with a newline or with a comma
const wchar_t *nextCsvField(const wchar_t *p, wchar_t sep, bool *newline)
{
    // Parse quoted sequences
    if ('"' == p[0]) {
        p++;
        while (1) {
            // Find next double-quote
            p = wcschr(p, L'"');
            // If we don't find it or it's the last symbol
            // then this is the last field
            if (!p || !p[1])
                return 0;
            // Check for "", it is an escaped double-quote
            if (p[1] != '"')
                break;
            // Skip the escaped double-quote
            p += 2;
        }
    }

    // Find next newline or comma.
    wchar_t newline_or_sep[4] = L"\n\r ";
    newline_or_sep[2] = sep;
    p = wcspbrk(p, newline_or_sep);

    // If no newline or separator, this is the last field.
    if (!p)
        return 0;

    // Check if we had newline.
    *newline = (p[0] == '\r' || p[0] == '\n');

    // Handle "\r\n", otherwise just increment
    if (p[0] == '\r' && p[1] == '\n')
        p += 2;
    else
        p++;

    return p;
}

static wchar_t *csvFieldData(const wchar_t *fld_s, const wchar_t *fld_e, wchar_t *buffer, size_t buflen)
{
    wchar_t *dst = buffer;
    wchar_t *end = buffer + buflen - 1;
    const wchar_t *src = fld_s;

    if (*src == L'"')
    {
        const wchar_t *p = src + 1;
        while (p < fld_e && dst < end)
        {
            if (p[0] == L'"' && p+1 < fld_s && p[1] == L'"')
            {
                *dst++ = p[0];
                p += 2;
            }
            else if (p[0] == L'"')
            {
                p++;
                break;
            }
            else
                *dst++ = *p++;
        }
        src = p;
    }
    while (src < fld_e && dst < end)
        *dst++ = *src++;
    if (dst >= end)
        return 0;
    *dst = L'\0';
    return(buffer);
}

static void dissect(const wchar_t *line)
{
    const wchar_t *start = line;
    const wchar_t *next;
    bool     eol;
    wprintf(L"Input %3zd: [%.*ls]\n", wcslen(line), wcslen(line)-1, line);
    while ((next = nextCsvField(start, L',', &eol)) != 0)
    {
        wchar_t buffer[1024];
        wprintf(L"Raw Field: [%.*ls] (eol = %d)\n", (next - start - eol), start, eol);
        if (csvFieldData(start, next-1, buffer, sizeof(buffer)/sizeof(buffer[0])) != 0)
            wprintf(L"Field %3zd: [%ls]\n", wcslen(buffer), buffer);
        start = next;
    }
}

static const wchar_t multiline[] =
   L"First field of first row,\"This field is multiline\n"
    "\n"
    "but that's OK because it's enclosed in double quotes, and this\n"
    "is an escaped \"\" double quote\" but this one \"\" is not\n"
    "   \"This is second field of second row, but it is not multiline\n"
    "   because it doesn't start \n"
    "   with an immediate double quote\"\n"
    ;

int main(void)
{
    wchar_t line[1024];

    while (fgetws(line, sizeof(line)/sizeof(line[0]), stdin))
        dissect(line);
    dissect(multiline);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a ready-to use function if all you need is to load a data file of doubles (no integers, no text).

#include <sstream>
#include <fstream>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

/**
 * Parse a CSV data file and fill the 2d STL vector "data".
 * Limits: only "pure datas" of doubles, not encapsulated by " and without \n inside.
 * Further no formatting in the data (e.g. scientific notation)
 * It however handles both dots and commas as decimal separators and removes thousand separator.
 * 
 * returnCodes[0]: file access 0-> ok 1-> not able to read; 2-> decimal separator equal to comma separator
 * returnCodes[1]: number of records
 * returnCodes[2]: number of fields. -1 If rows have different field size
 * 
 */
vector<int>
readCsvData (vector <vector <double>>& data, const string& filename, const string& delimiter, const string& decseparator){

 int vv[3] = { 0,0,0 };
 vector<int> returnCodes(&vv[0], &vv[0]+3);

 string rowstring, stringtoken;
 double doubletoken;
 int rowcount=0;
 int fieldcount=0;
 data.clear();

 ifstream iFile(filename, ios_base::in);
 if (!iFile.is_open()){
   returnCodes[0] = 1;
   return returnCodes;
 }
 while (getline(iFile, rowstring)) {
    if (rowstring=="") continue; // empty line
    rowcount ++; //let's start with 1
    if(delimiter == decseparator){
      returnCodes[0] = 2;
      return returnCodes;
    }
    if(decseparator != "."){
     // remove dots (used as thousand separators)
     string::iterator end_pos = remove(rowstring.begin(), rowstring.end(), '.');
     rowstring.erase(end_pos, rowstring.end());
     // replace decimal separator with dots.
     replace(rowstring.begin(), rowstring.end(),decseparator.c_str()[0], '.'); 
    } else {
     // remove commas (used as thousand separators)
     string::iterator end_pos = remove(rowstring.begin(), rowstring.end(), ',');
     rowstring.erase(end_pos, rowstring.end());
    }
    // tokenize..
    vector<double> tokens;
    // Skip delimiters at beginning.
    string::size_type lastPos = rowstring.find_first_not_of(delimiter, 0);
    // Find first "non-delimiter".
    string::size_type pos     = rowstring.find_first_of(delimiter, lastPos);
    while (string::npos != pos || string::npos != lastPos){
        // Found a token, convert it to double add it to the vector.
        stringtoken = rowstring.substr(lastPos, pos - lastPos);
        if (stringtoken == "") {
      tokens.push_back(0.0);
    } else {
          istringstream totalSString(stringtoken);
      totalSString >> doubletoken;
      tokens.push_back(doubletoken);
    }     
        // Skip delimiters.  Note the "not_of"
        lastPos = rowstring.find_first_not_of(delimiter, pos);
        // Find next "non-delimiter"
        pos = rowstring.find_first_of(delimiter, lastPos);
    }
    if(rowcount == 1){
      fieldcount = tokens.size();
      returnCodes[2] = tokens.size();
    } else {
      if ( tokens.size() != fieldcount){
    returnCodes[2] = -1;
      }
    }
    data.push_back(tokens);
 }
 iFile.close();
 returnCodes[1] = rowcount;
 return returnCodes;
}
share|improve this answer

Another quick and easy way is to use Boost.Fusion I/O:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

#include <boost/fusion/adapted/boost_tuple.hpp>
#include <boost/fusion/sequence/io.hpp>

namespace fusion = boost::fusion;

struct CsvString
{
    std::string value;

    // Stop reading a string once a CSV delimeter is encountered.
    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& s, CsvString& v) {
        v.value.clear();
        for(;;) {
            auto c = s.peek();
            if(std::istream::traits_type::eof() == c || ',' == c || '\n' == c)
                break;
            v.value.push_back(c);
            s.get();
        }
        return s;
    }

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& s, CsvString const& v) {
        return s << v.value;
    }
};

int main() {
    std::stringstream input("abc,123,true,3.14\n"
                            "def,456,false,2.718\n");

    typedef boost::tuple<CsvString, int, bool, double> CsvRow;

    using fusion::operator<<;
    std::cout << std::boolalpha;

    using fusion::operator>>;
    input >> std::boolalpha;
    input >> fusion::tuple_open("") >> fusion::tuple_close("\n") >> fusion::tuple_delimiter(',');

    for(CsvRow row; input >> row;)
        std::cout << row << '\n';
}

Outputs:

(abc 123 true 3.14)
(def 456 false 2.718)
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