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I'm creating a DNS name resolver. While parsing the returned packet I read the RR type then pass it through switch to initialize a derived type of class Record. Record types is a large enum type. I map the enum to a struct using template specialization.

template < QueryType n >
struct Struct;

template <> struct Struct< DNS_Q_A > { typedef A Type; };
template <> struct Struct< DNS_Q_CNAME > { typedef CNAME Type; };

template < QueryType n > struct Struct { typedef UNKNOWN Type; };

Currently I have 4 switch statements which all do a very similar thing. Namely call operator new, placement new, for both copy and move c'tors. This is a lot of code to maintain. I would like to have just 1 switch statement where I could pass in some type of object containing the function to perform, return type and n number of parameters.

The switch statements are like this:

switch ( nType )
{
case DNS_Q_A:
    pInstance = new ( &Container ) Struct< DNS_Q_A >::Type( dynamic_cast< const Struct< DNS_Q_A >::Type& >( Other ) );
    break;
case DNS_Q_CNAME:
    pInstance = new ( &Container ) Struct< DNS_Q_CNAME >::Type( dynamic_cast< const Struct< DNS_Q_CNAME >::Type& >( Other ) );
    break;
}

As you can see, each case is identical other than the reliance on the struct type. This screams out 'template' to me but I can't figure out how to pass in an object.

Am I limited to coding 4 switch's or is there a way? Please don't quote "Boost", this code has to be independent of any other libraries.

Solution: (Thanks to Jan Hudec)

template< template < class > class Action >
typename Action< Struct< DNS_Q_A >::Type >::result_type
    CreateRecord ( 
        unsigned n,
        typename Action< Struct< DNS_Q_A >::Type >::first_argument_type arg1,
        typename Action< Struct< DNS_Q_A >::Type >::second_argument_type arg2 )
{
    typedef typename typename Action< Struct< DNS_Q_A >::Type >::result_type ReturnType;
    switch ( n )
    {
    case DNS_Q_A:       return static_cast< ReturnType >( Action< Struct< DNS_Q_A >::Type >()( arg1, arg2 ) );
    case DNS_Q_NS:      return static_cast< ReturnType >( Action< Struct< DNS_Q_NS >::Type >()( arg1, arg2 ) );
    /*...*/
    }
}

with Action struct defined as:

template < typename T >
struct Copy : std::binary_function< storage_type&, const Record&, Record* >
{
    Record* operator() ( storage_type& Storage, const Record& Obj )
    {
        return new ( &Storage ) T( dynamic_cast< const T& >( Obj ) );
    }
};
template < typename T >
struct Move : std::binary_function< storage_type&, Record&&, Record* >
{
    Record* operator() ( storage_type& Storage, const Record& Obj )
    {
        return new ( &Storage ) T( dynamic_cast< const T& >( std::move( Obj ) ) );
    }
};

And Switch statements replaced with:

pInstance = CreateRecord< Copy >( nType, Container, Other );
share|improve this question
    
Can your code use C++11 features? Specifically variadic templates would make things a bit easier to use. – Jan Hudec Jun 26 '12 at 6:05
    
I have limited C++11 with VS2010, unfortunately variadic templates are unsupported. – Twifty Jun 26 '12 at 6:10
1  
Well, you can start with template <int i> BaseType* doit(ContainerType &container, BaseType &other) { return new ( &container ) Struct<i>::Type( dynamic_cast< const Struct< i >::Type& >( other ) ); }, then write the dispatch in a wrapper around that function template. (I assume A, CNAME, etc. are all subclasses of some base class, and Other is an instance of that base class?) – abarnert Jun 26 '12 at 6:11
    
A, CNAME, etc. are all derived from abstract class Record. Other is either an instance of derived type or base type. c'tors handle those cases as well as type mismatches. I started out with your suggestion, but the Switch() function would need a common base type with virtual members and virtual members cannot be templates. – Twifty Jun 26 '12 at 6:20
    
OK, that's what I figured. It looks like Jan Hudec is in the middle of writing out the answer, so I'll wait rather than duplicating effort. – abarnert Jun 26 '12 at 6:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can create a function template that will take functor template to execute. Without C++11 variadic arguments all the functors need the same number of arguments, so you will have to either pack them in a structure or pass NULLs when they are irrelevant. With variadic templates (I haven't use them yet, so I don't remember exact syntax and won't write them here) you can easily have different arguments in each form.

The idea is like (off the top of my head, so there might be some typos):

template <template <typename T> class F>
F<Struct<DNS_Q_A>::Type>::return_type RecordCall(RecordType nType, const F<Struct<DNS_Q_A>::Type>::argument_type &arg)
{
    switch(nType)
    {
        case DNS_Q_A:
            return F<Struct<DNSK_Q_A>::Type>()(arg);
        case DNS_Q_CNAME:
            return F<Struct<DNSK_Q_CNAME>::Type>()(arg);
        // ...
     }
}

Now you write the individual functions like:

template <typename T>
struct Clone : std::unary_function<BaseType *, const BaseType *>
{
    BaseType *operator()(const BaseType *source)
    {
        return new<T>(dynamic_cast<const BaseType &>(*source));
    }
}

and combine together:

target = RecordCall<Clone>(source->GetType(), source);

(and wrap in another function, that will insert the getter and/or pack arguments for the multi-argument forms like placement copy construction)

Though for copying the common way to do this is to have virtual Clone member method. But that won't work for construction.

Edit: Note, that I defined the return and argument types within the inner template as typedefs (using the standard unary_function helper), but they can alternatively be passed as separate template arguments, especially if the use of RecordCall is going to be wrapped in another function. Perhaps the return type does not even have to be a template parameter as it's going to be Record * for all the cases mentioned in the question.

share|improve this answer
    
That's surprisingly similar to what I first tried. I must have been on the right track but the return type and function parameters sent me down the wrong path. One problem I see above is the return type, always being A*. I'm sure I could get away with returning the base Record* or none at all. I'll code it up tonight and update as to how it went. Thanks. – Twifty Jun 26 '12 at 7:43
    
@Waldermort: Both argument and return types have to be the same for all specializations of the inner functor, because the outer template only knows at runtime which specific subtype it will be. So you have to use the bases there. – Jan Hudec Jun 26 '12 at 14:43
    
Sorry didn't mark your answer earlier. I wanted to get it working first. Now, it works exactly as I hoped. I was having trouble with the parameters earlier. Your suggestion to use std::unary_function, along with google's examples, pushed me in the right direction. Thankyou very much. – Twifty Jun 26 '12 at 14:50

I must admit I don't quite understand what cannot be accomplished here through... dumb virtual functions.

class Object {
public:
    virtual Object* clone() const = 0;
    virtual void clone(Container& c) const = 0;

    // ...
};


class A: public Object {
public:
    virtual A* clone() const override { return new A(*this); }
    virtual void clone(Container& c) const override { new (&c) A(*this); }

    // ...
};

Then... just get rid of the switch:

pInstance = other.clone(container);

and the job is done.

share|improve this answer
    
I already have that implemented for copying. That wasn't the question. At some point the actual A/CNAME record has to be created, for that the type MUST be known. As well as the A/CNAME record, I have an ANY record which uses placement new for initialization. Again the record type must be known. Hence 4 large switch statements. – Twifty Jun 26 '12 at 7:06
    
@Waldermort: then why were you talking about copy and move constructors ? Those are already existing objects, thus can use virtual methods; and your example is about an already existing object as well. It seems to me that you only need one switch: the one for the initial construction, isn't it ? – Matthieu M. Jun 26 '12 at 8:02
    
There is a switch for calling each copy constructor, move constructor, placement copy constructor and placement new constructor. Clearly stated in my initial question. All of them initialize a derived type. Hence the question, how can I do this with one switch? – Twifty Jun 26 '12 at 8:33
    
@Waldermort: and my response: there is no need for a switch to copy or move. Since you already have an instance of a derived type, a simple virtual call suffices. The only moment you need a switch is for the initial construction. – Matthieu M. Jun 26 '12 at 11:22
    
Sorry, I didn't realize English isn't your first language. Allow me to repeat. Each switch initializes, calls all four forms of new, calls a constructor. operator new doesn't do anything else but allocate memory and/or call a constructor. What you are proposing is for operator=() which assigns a value and not constructs it. – Twifty Jun 26 '12 at 12:10

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