Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Edit: I just tried it in an IDLE module and it worked fine. However, it doesn't work in IEP. Any ideas on how that can be?

I'm doing Project Euler's problem #1 (programming newb here). Fortunately, I solved the problem using another sum method, but I'm trying to figure out why my first method doesn't work.

Here is the code:

data1 = range(0, 1000, 3)
data2 = range(0, 1000, 5)
data3 = list(set(data1 + data2)) # makes new list without duplicates
total = sum(data3) # calculate sum of data3 list's elements
print total

And here is the error:

line 8, in <module> total2 = sum(data3)
TypeError: 'int' object is not callable

When doing a search, I found this explanation for the error. It makes sense, but I can't relate it to my problem.:

In Python a "callable" is usually a function. The message means you are treating a number (an >"int") as if it were a function (a "callable"), so Python doesn't know what to do, so it >stops.

I've also read that sum() is capable of being used on lists, so I'm wondering what is going wrong here.

Thank you for any help in advance.

share|improve this question
5  
This works perfectly for me... did you name a variable sum before calling the function? –  jadkik94 Jun 26 '12 at 6:32
    
Python version? –  mattste Jun 26 '12 at 6:34
    
I'm on 2.7. Are you on 3? –  jadkik94 Jun 26 '12 at 6:36
    
Just edited original. I'm using IDE. Works in IDLE, as you mentioned. IDE is running Python 2.7. This is weird. –  mattste Jun 26 '12 at 6:37
2  
You don't really need to convert your set back to a list... sum() will handle any sequence of numbers. –  mhawke Jun 26 '12 at 6:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Restart your interpreter

Python 2.7.3 (default, Apr 20 2012, 22:44:07) 
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> data1 = range(0, 1000, 3)
>>> data2 = range(0, 1000, 5)
>>> data3 = list(set(data1 + data2)) # makes new list without duplicates
>>> total = sum(data3) # calculate sum of data3 list's elements
>>> print total
233168

If you shadow the sum builtin, you can get the error you are seeing

>>> sum = 0
>>> total = sum(data3) # calculate sum of data3 list's elements
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'int' object is not callable

Also, note that sum will work fine on the set there is no need to convert it to a list

share|improve this answer

This means that somewhere else in your code, you have something like:

sum = 0

Which shadows the builtin sum (which is callable) with an int (which isn't).

share|improve this answer
    
The code shown is the whole program. I wish it was that simple. Any other ideas? –  mattste Jun 26 '12 at 6:33
2  
@mattste restart your python interpreter and try it. –  jamylak Jun 26 '12 at 6:37
1  
Works now. Thanks for the help! –  mattste Jun 26 '12 at 6:40
    
help me a lot. thx –  songhir Nov 19 '13 at 1:40

In the interpreter its easy to restart it and fix such problems. If you don't want to restart the interpreter, there is another way to fix it:

Python 2.6.6 (r266:84292, Dec 27 2010, 00:02:40)
[GCC 4.4.5] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> l = [1,2,3]
>>> sum(l)
6
>>> sum = 0 # oops! shadowed a builtin!
>>> sum(l)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'int' object is not callable
>>> import sys
>>> sum = sys.modules['__builtin__'].sum # -- fixing sum
>>> sum(l)
6

This also comes in handy if you happened to assign a value to any other builtin, like dict or list

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.