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I want to remove all special characters from a string. Allowed characters are A-Z (uppercase or lowercase), numbers (0-9), underscore (_), or the dot sign (.).

I have the following, it works but I suspect (I know!) it's not very efficient:

    public static string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string str)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
        {
            if ((str[i] >= '0' && str[i] <= '9')
                || (str[i] >= 'A' && str[i] <= 'z'
                    || (str[i] == '.' || str[i] == '_')))
                {
                    sb.Append(str[i]);
                }
        }

        return sb.ToString();
    }

What is the most efficient way to do this? What would a regular expression look like, and how does it compare with normal string manipulation?

The strings that will be cleaned will be rather short, usually between 10 and 30 characters in length.

share|improve this question
3  
I won't put this in an answer since it won't be any more efficient, but there are a number of static char methods like char.IsLetterOrDigit() that you could use in your if statement to make it more legible at least. –  Martin Harris Jul 13 '09 at 15:40
3  
I'm not sure that checking for A to z is safe, in that it brings in 6 characters that aren't alphabetical, only one of which is desired (underbar). –  Steven Sudit Jul 13 '09 at 15:41
3  
Focus on making your code more readable. unless you are doing this in a loop like 500 times a second, the efficiency isn't a big deal. Use a regexp and it will be much easier to read.l –  Byron Whitlock Jul 13 '09 at 15:42
2  
Byron, you're probably right about needing to emphasize readability. However, I'm skeptical about regexp being readable. :-) –  Steven Sudit Jul 13 '09 at 15:45
1  
Regular expressions being readable or not is kind of like German being readable or not; it depends on if you know it or not (although in both cases you will every now and then come across grammatical rules that make no sense ;) –  Blixt Jul 13 '09 at 15:50

21 Answers 21

up vote 159 down vote accepted

Why do you think that your method is not efficient? It's actually one of the most efficient ways that you can do it.

You should of course read the character into a local variable or use an enumerator to reduce the number of array accesses:

public static string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string str) {
   StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
   foreach (char c in str) {
      if ((c >= '0' && c <= '9') || (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z') || (c >= 'a' && c <= 'z') || c == '.' || c == '_') {
         sb.Append(c);
      }
   }
   return sb.ToString();
}

One thing that makes a method like this efficient is that it scales well. The execution time will be relative to the length of the string. There is no nasty surprises if you would use it on a large string.

Edit:
I made a quick performance test, running each function a million times with a 24 character string. These are the results:

Original function: 54.5 ms.
My suggested change: 47.1 ms.
Mine with setting StringBuilder capacity: 43.3 ms.
Regular expression: 294.4 ms.

Edit 2: I added the distinction between A-Z and a-z in the code above. (I reran the performance test, and there is no noticable difference.)

Edit 3:
I tested the lookup+char[] solution, and it runs in about 13 ms.

The price to pay is, of course, the initialization of the huge lookup table and keeping it in memory. Well, it's not that much data, but it's much for such a trivial function...

private static bool[] _lookup;

static Program() {
   _lookup = new bool[65535];
   for (char c = '0'; c <= '9'; c++) _lookup[c] = true;
   for (char c = 'A'; c <= 'Z'; c++) _lookup[c] = true;
   for (char c = 'a'; c <= 'z'; c++) _lookup[c] = true;
   _lookup['.'] = true;
   _lookup['_'] = true;
}

public static string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string str) {
   char[] buffer = new char[str.Length];
   int index = 0;
   foreach (char c in str) {
      if (_lookup[c]) {
         buffer[index] = c;
         index++;
      }
   }
   return new string(buffer, 0, index);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I agree. The only other change I would make is to add the initial capacity argument to the StringBuilder constructor, "= new StringBuilder(str.Length)". –  David Jul 13 '09 at 16:05
    
+1, and don't forget to change it to: (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z') || (c >= 'a' && c <= 'z') for correctness. –  user7116 Jul 13 '09 at 16:19
2  
My answer, using a char[] buffer rather than StringBuilder, has a slight edge on this one according to my testing. (Mine's less readable though, so the small performance benefit probably isn't worth it.) –  LukeH Jul 13 '09 at 16:46
1  
@Steven: That may well be the case, but the benchmarks speak for themselves! In my tests, using a char[] buffer performs (slightly) better than StringBuilder, even when scaling up to strings that are tens of thousands of characters in length. –  LukeH Jul 13 '09 at 17:02
9  
@downvoter: Why the downvote? If you don't explain what you think is wrong, it can't improve the answer. –  Guffa Aug 6 '11 at 18:56

Well, unless you really need to squeeze the performance out of your function, just go with what is easiest to maintain and understand. A regular expression would look like this:

For additional performance, you can either pre-compile it or just tell it to compile on first call (subsequent calls will be faster.)

public static string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string str)
{
    return Regex.Replace(str, "[^a-zA-Z0-9_.]+", "", RegexOptions.Compiled);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd guess that this is probably a complex enough query that it would be faster than the OP's approach, especially if pre-compiled. I have no evidence to back that up, however. It should be tested. Unless it's drastically slower, I'd choose this approach regardless, since it's way easier to read and maintain. +1 –  rmeador Jul 13 '09 at 15:48
3  
Its a very simple regex (no backtracking or any complex stuff in there) so it should be pretty damn fast. –  Will Jul 13 '09 at 16:00
    
Perhaps. But do you want to bet the table-driven approach will be faster? –  Steven Sudit Jul 13 '09 at 16:11
6  
@rmeador: without it being compiled it is about 5x slower, compiled it is 3x slower than his method. Still 10x simpler though :-D –  user7116 Jul 13 '09 at 16:15
6  
Regular expressions are no magical hammers and never faster than hand optimized code. –  Christian Klauser Jul 13 '09 at 16:58

I suggest creating a simple lookup table, which you can initialize in the static constructor to set any combination of characters to valid. This lets you do a quick, single check.

edit

Also, for speed, you'll want to initialize the capacity of your StringBuilder to the length of your input string. This will avoid reallocations. These two methods together will give you both speed and flexibility.

another edit

I think the compiler might optimize it out, but as a matter of style as well as efficiency, I recommend foreach instead of for.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for efficiency –  Blixt Jul 13 '09 at 15:42
    
For arrays, for and foreach produce similar code. I don't know about strings though. I doubt that the JIT knows about the array-like nature of String. –  Christian Klauser Jul 13 '09 at 15:52
1  
I bet the JIT knows more about the array-like nature of string than your [joke removed]. Anders etal did a lot of work optimizing everything about strings in .net –  Will Jul 13 '09 at 16:02
    
I've done this using HashSet<char> and it is about 2x slower than his method. Using bool[] is barely faster (0.0469ms/iter v. 0.0559ms/iter) than the version he has in OP...with the problem of being less readable. –  user7116 Jul 13 '09 at 16:36
1  
I couldn't see any performance difference between using a bool array and an int array. I would use a bool array, as it brings down the lookup table from 256 kb to 64 kb, but it's still a lot of data for such a trivial function... And it's only about 30% faster. –  Guffa Jul 13 '09 at 17:07

A regular expression will look like:

public string RemoveSpecialChars(string input)
{
    return Regex.Replace(input, @"[^0-9a-zA-Z\._]", string.Empty);
}

But if performance is highly important, I recommend you to do some benchmarks before selecting the "regex path"...

share|improve this answer
    
That regex is about 20% slower than: [^0-9a-zA-Z\._]+ interestingly enough... –  user7116 Jul 13 '09 at 16:16
public static string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string str)
{
    char[] buffer = new char[str.Length];
    int idx = 0;

    foreach (char c in str)
    {
        if ((c >= '0' && c <= '9') || (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z')
            || (c >= 'a' && c <= 'z') || (c == '.') || (c == '_'))
        {
            buffer[idx] = c;
            idx++;
        }
    }

    return new string(buffer, 0, idx);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, tested and it is about 40% faster than StringBuilder. 0.0294ms/string v. 0.0399ms/string –  user7116 Jul 13 '09 at 17:14
    
Just to be sure, do you mean StringBuilder with or without pre-allocation? –  Steven Sudit Jul 13 '09 at 19:28
    
With pre-allocation, it is still 40% slower than the char[] allocation and new string. –  user7116 Jul 14 '09 at 2:28
1  
I like this. I tweaked this method foreach (char c in input.Where(c => char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) || allowedSpecialCharacters.Any(x => x == c))) buffer[idx++] = c; –  Chris Marisic Oct 17 '12 at 15:47

If you're using a dynamic list of characters, LINQ may offer a much faster and graceful solution:

public static string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string value, char[] specialCharacters)
{
    return new String(value.Except(specialCharacters).ToArray());
}

I compared this approach against two of the previous "fast" approaches (release compilation):

  • Char array solution by LukeH - 427 ms
  • StringBuilder solution - 429 ms
  • LINQ (this answer) - 98 ms

Note that the algorithm is slightly modified - the characters are passed in as an array rather than hard-coded, which could be impacting things slightly (ie/ the other solutions would have an inner foor loop to check the character array).

If I switch to a hard-coded solution using a LINQ where clause, the results are:

  • Char array solution - 7ms
  • StringBuilder solution - 22ms
  • LINQ - 60 ms

Might be worth looking at LINQ or a modified approach if you're planning on writing a more generic solution, rather than hard-coding the list of characters. LINQ definitely gives you concise, highly readable code - even more so than Regex.

share|improve this answer

I'm not convinced your algorithm is anything but efficient. It's O(n) and only looks at each character once. You're not gonna get any better than that unless you magically know values before checking them.

I would however initialize the capacity of your StringBuilder to the initial size of the string. I'm guessing your perceived performance problem comes from memory reallocation.

Side note: Checking A-z is not safe. You're including [, \, ], ^, _, and `...

Side note 2: For that extra bit of efficiency, put the comparisons in an order to minimize the number of comparisons. (At worst, you're talking 8 comparisons tho, so don't think too hard.) This changes with your expected input, but one example could be:

if (str[i] >= '0' && str[i] <= 'z' && 
    (str[i] >= 'a' || str[i] <= '9' ||  (str[i] >= 'A' && str[i] <= 'Z') || 
    str[i] == '_') || str[i] == '.')

Side note 3: If for whatever reason you REALLY need this to be fast, a switch statement may be faster. The compiler should create a jump table for you, resulting in only a single comparison:

switch (str[i])
{
    case '0':
    case '1':
    .
    .
    .
    case '.':
        sb.Append(str[i]);
        break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I agree that you can't beat O(n) on this one. However, there is a cost per comparison which can be lowered. A table lookup has a low, fixed cost, while a series of comparisons is going to increase in cost as you add more exceptions. –  Steven Sudit Jul 13 '09 at 15:47
    
About side note 3, do you really think the jump table would be faster than table lookup? –  Steven Sudit Jul 13 '09 at 16:12
    
I ran the quick performance test on the switch solution, and it performs the same as the comparison. –  Guffa Jul 13 '09 at 16:54
    
@Steven Sudit - I'd venture they're actually about the same. Care to run a test? –  lc. Jul 13 '09 at 17:12
6  
O(n) notation sometimes pisses me off. People will make stupid assumptions based on the fact the algorithm is already O(n). If we changed this routine to replace the str[i] calls with a function that retrieved the comparison value by constructing a one-time SSL connection with a server on the opposite side of the world... you damn sure would see a massive performance difference and the algorithm is STILL O(n). The cost of O(1) for each algorithm is significant and NOT equivalent! –  darron Jul 13 '09 at 17:47

I would use a String Replace with a Regular Expression searching for "special characters", replacing all characters found with an empty string.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 certainly less code and arguably more readable ignoring write-once Regex. –  kenny Jul 13 '09 at 16:38
1  
@kenny - I agree. The original question even states that the strings are short - 10-30 chars. But apparently a lot of people still think we're selling CPU time by the second... –  Tom Bushell Nov 12 '11 at 0:10
    
Reguler expressin works so lazy.So it shouldn't be used always. –  zeitgeist Jul 10 '13 at 19:45

It seems good to me. The only improvement I would make is to initialize the StringBuilder with the length of the string.

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(str.Length);
share|improve this answer
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

for (int i = 0; i < fName.Length; i++)
{
   if (char.IsLetterOrDigit(fName[i]))
    {
       sb.Append(fName[i]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I agree with this code sample. The only different it I make it into Extension Method of string type. So that you can use it in a very simple line or code:

string test = "abc@#$123";
test.RemoveSpecialCharacters();

Thank to Guffa for your experiment.

public static class MethodExtensionHelper
    {
    public static string RemoveSpecialCharacters(this string str)
        {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            foreach (char c in str)
            {
                if ((c >= '0' && c <= '9') || (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z') || (c >= 'a' && c <= 'z') || c == '_')
                {
                    sb.Append(c);
                }
            }
            return sb.ToString();
        }
}
share|improve this answer

This doesn't seem inefficient at all. You may be able to improve on it but you may compromise readability / maintainability.

Regards

share|improve this answer

For S&G's, Linq-ified way:

var original = "(*^%foo)(@)&^@#><>?:\":';=-+_";
var valid = new char[] { 
    'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 
    'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z', 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 
    'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O', 'P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 
    'T', 'U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Y', 'Z', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', 
    '9', '0', '.', '_' };
var result = string.Join("",
    (from x in original.ToCharArray() 
     where valid.Contains(x) select x.ToString())
        .ToArray());

I don't think this is going to be the most efficient way, however.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's not, because it's a linear search. –  Steven Sudit Jul 13 '09 at 16:41
public string RemoveSpecial(string evalstr)
{
StringBuilder finalstr = new StringBuilder();
            foreach(char c in evalstr){
            int charassci = Convert.ToInt16(c);
            if (!(charassci >= 33 && charassci <= 47))// special char ???
             finalstr.append(c);
            }
return finalstr.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer

Use:

s.erase(std::remove_if(s.begin(), s.end(), my_predicate), s.end());

bool my_predicate(char c)
{
 return !(isalpha(c) || c=='_' || c==' '); // depending on you definition of special characters
}

And you'll get a clean string s.

erase() will strip it of all the special characters and is highly customisable with the my_predicate() function.

share|improve this answer

HashSet is O(1)
Not sure if it is faster than the existing comparison

private static HashSet<char> ValidChars = new HashSet<char>() { 'a', 'b', 'c', 'A', 'B', 'C', '1', '2', '3', '_' };
public static string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string str)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(str.Length / 2);
    foreach (char c in str)
    {
        if (ValidChars.Contains(c)) sb.Append(c);
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}

I tested and this in not faster than the accepted answer.
I will leave it up as if you needed a configurable set of characters this would be a good solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you think that the comparison is not O(1)? –  Guffa Sep 24 '13 at 19:47
    
@Guffa I am not sure it is not and I removed my comment. And +1. I should have done more testing before making the comment. –  Blam Sep 24 '13 at 20:16

I wonder if a Regex-based replacement (possibly compiled) is faster. Would have to test that Someone has found this to be ~5 times slower.

Other than that, you should initialize the StringBuilder with an expected length, so that the intermediate string doesn't have to be copied around while it grows.

A good number is the length of the original string, or something slightly lower (depending on the nature of the functions inputs).

Finally, you can use a lookup table (in the range 0..127) to find out whether a character is to be accepted.

share|improve this answer
    
A regular expression has been tested already, and it's about five times slower. With a lookup table in the range 0..127 you still have to range check the character code before using the lookup table, as characters are 16 bit values, not 7 bit values. –  Guffa Sep 24 '13 at 21:56
    
@Guffa Err... yes? ;) –  Christian Klauser Sep 25 '13 at 17:39

I had to do something similar for work, but in my case I had to filter all that is not a letter, number or whitespace (but you could easily modify it to your needs). The filtering is done client-side in JavaScript, but for security reasons I am also doing the filtering server-side. Since I can expect most of the strings to be clean, I would like to avoid copying the string unless I really need to. This let my to the implementation below, which should perform better for both clean and dirty strings.

public static string EnsureOnlyLetterDigitOrWhiteSpace(string input)
{
    StringBuilder cleanedInput = null;
    for (var i = 0; i < input.Length; ++i)
    {
        var currentChar = input[i];
        var charIsValid = char.IsLetterOrDigit(currentChar) || char.IsWhiteSpace(currentChar);

        if (charIsValid)
        {
            if(cleanedInput != null)
                cleanedInput.Append(currentChar);
        }
        else
        {
            if (cleanedInput != null) continue;
            cleanedInput = new StringBuilder();
            if (i > 0)
                cleanedInput.Append(input.Substring(0, i));
        }
    }

    return cleanedInput == null ? input : cleanedInput.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer

The following code has the following output (conclusion is that we can also save some memory resources allocating array smaller size):

lookup = new bool[123];

for (var c = '0'; c <= '9'; c++)
{
    lookup[c] = true; System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine((int)c + ": " + (char)c);
}

for (var c = 'A'; c <= 'Z'; c++)
{
    lookup[c] = true; System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine((int)c + ": " + (char)c);
}

for (var c = 'a'; c <= 'z'; c++)
{
    lookup[c] = true; System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine((int)c + ": " + (char)c);
}

48: 0  
49: 1  
50: 2  
51: 3  
52: 4  
53: 5  
54: 6  
55: 7  
56: 8  
57: 9  
65: A  
66: B  
67: C  
68: D  
69: E  
70: F  
71: G  
72: H  
73: I  
74: J  
75: K  
76: L  
77: M  
78: N  
79: O  
80: P  
81: Q  
82: R  
83: S  
84: T  
85: U  
86: V  
87: W  
88: X  
89: Y  
90: Z  
97: a  
98: b  
99: c  
100: d  
101: e  
102: f  
103: g  
104: h  
105: i  
106: j  
107: k  
108: l  
109: m  
110: n  
111: o  
112: p  
113: q  
114: r  
115: s  
116: t  
117: u  
118: v  
119: w  
120: x  
121: y  
122: z  

You can also add the following code lines to support Russian locale (array size will be 1104):

for (var c = 'А'; c <= 'Я'; c++)
{
    lookup[c] = true; System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine((int)c + ": " + (char)c);
}

for (var c = 'а'; c <= 'я'; c++)
{
    lookup[c] = true; System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine((int)c + ": " + (char)c);
}
share|improve this answer
public static string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string str){
    return str.replaceAll("[^A-Za-z0-9_\\\\.]", "");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid replaceAll is not C# String function but either Java or JavaScript –  Csaba Toth Sep 27 '13 at 18:38

If you're worried about speed, use pointers to edit the existing string. You could pin the string and get a pointer to it, then run a for loop over each character, overwriting each invalid character with a replacement character. It would be extremely efficient and would not require allocating any new string memory. You would also need to compile your module with the unsafe option, and add the "unsafe" modifier to your method header in order to use pointers.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string str = "string!$%with^&*invalid!!characters";
    Console.WriteLine( str ); //print original string
    FixMyString( str, ' ' );
    Console.WriteLine( str ); //print string again to verify that it has been modified
    Console.ReadLine(); //pause to leave command prompt open
}


public static unsafe void FixMyString( string str, char replacement_char )
{
    fixed (char* p_str = str)
    {
        char* c = p_str; //temp pointer, since p_str is read-only
        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++, c++) //loop through each character in string, advancing the character pointer as well
            if (!IsValidChar(*c)) //check whether the current character is invalid
                (*c) = replacement_char; //overwrite character in existing string with replacement character
    }
}

public static bool IsValidChar( char c )
{
    return (c >= '0' && c <= '9') || (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z') || (c >= 'a' && c <= 'z') || (c == '.' || c == '_');
    //return char.IsLetterOrDigit( c ) || c == '.' || c == '_'; //this may work as well
}
share|improve this answer
9  
Noooooooooo! Changing a string in .NET is BAAAAAAAAAAAAD! Everything in the framework relies on the rule that strings are immutable, and if you break that you can get very surprising side effects... –  Guffa Jul 13 '09 at 16:52

protected by Anirudh Ramanathan Dec 18 '12 at 14:35

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