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I'm using SQL Server 2008.

Let's say I have two hypothetical tables like below:

CREATE TABLE [Department](
    [Id]            int    IDENTITY(1,1),
    [ManagerId]     int    NULL, -- << Foreign key to the Person table
    -- other fields
)

CREATE TABLE [Person](
    [Id]            int    IDENTITY(1,1),
    [DepartmentId]  int    NOT NULL, -- << Foreign key to the Department table
    -- other fields
)

Now, I want to return a list of rows from the [Person] table (i.e. list of staff for a given department). Only one (or zero) of these rows will match the [ManagerId] field in the [Department] table. And I want to flag the matched row with a boolean field on the fly... the resultant rowset will resemble the following schema:

[Id]        INT,
[IsManager] BIT NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
-- other fields

The [IsManager] field will be TRUE when [Department].[ManagerId] matches [Person].[Id].

This is fairly trivial to do with two (or more) queries. But how can I achieve this using a single SQL statement?

share|improve this question
    
A bit field isn't a boolean field (just saying). –  Andriy M Jun 26 '12 at 7:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add an expression to your SELECT clause where you compare actual persons Id with ManagerId from persons department

SELECT
    Person.Id,
    Department.Id,
    CAST(CASE WHEN Person.Id=Department.ManagerId THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS BIT) AS IsManager
FROM Person
INNER JOIN Department ON Person.DepartmentId=Department.Id
WHERE Person.DepartmentId=<CONDITION>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is perfect! –  invarbrass Jun 26 '12 at 7:34

A left join from the Person table to the department table on ManagerId will do the trick for you:

SELECT p.Id AS PersonId, d.Id AS DepartmentId, 
    CAST(CASE WHEN d.Id IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END) AS IsManager
FROM Person p LEFT JOIN Department d ON p.Id = d.ManagerId

How it works: All rows from Person are return, regardless of the existence of a corresponding Department matching on ManagerId. For those Person records without a matching department, all of the Department fields in the resultset are NULL, so we can use that to determine whether or not there is a match.

Note that this query may return duplicate Person records, if a person is a manager for multiple departments. To this end, I have added the DepartmentId to the list. If you require a unique list of persons and their IsManager flag, drop d.DepartmentId from the select clause and insert DISTINCT after the select:

SELECT DISTINCT p.Id AS PersonId, 
    CAST(CASE WHEN d.DepartmentId IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END) AS IsManager
FROM Person p LEFT JOIN Department d ON p.Id = d.ManagerId
share|improve this answer
    
Why LEFT JOIN on ManagerId? Table Department is always referenced, so do an INNER JOIN. There are no duplicates an also a DISTINCT is unnecessary. See me anwer –  rabudde Jun 26 '12 at 7:17
    
Small typos fixed: SELECT p.Id AS PersonId, d.Id AS DepartmentId, CAST(CASE WHEN d.Id IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END AS BIT) AS IsManager FROM Person p LEFT JOIN Department d ON p.Id = d.ManagerId –  invarbrass Jun 26 '12 at 7:41
    
Thanks, invarbrass - I've edited that. Why the LEFT JOIN? Because the question called for all people, flagging those who are managers, and not just those who are managers of their own department. If there is a Senior Management department, where each member of the department is the manager of a different department, then the INNER JOIN wouldn't work. However, which solution best solves the problem depends on the structure of the data. –  Peter Jun 26 '12 at 15:42

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