Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am implementing a little extension for an existing application. Now I am creating a 'wpf-library' with mvvm and everything seems quite nice at the moment.

Now let's say I have an event to delete some datasets from the underlying Database. I don't want to do this in my extension-app but in the calling-application.

So what I have achieved (and whats working) is that the user clicks on my 'remove' button, the view-model implemented the command and here I am able to fire an event. What I wanted is to send the event out to the calling-application.

My startup-class that the calling-app is able to see now like this:

    public UserControl ViewToShowInContainer { get; private set; }

    public StartMyExtensionApplication(Model.TransportClass dataToWorkWith)
    {
        ViewToShowInContainer = new View.MainView();
        (ViewToShowInContainer.DataContext as VehicleSearchWPF.ViewModel.MyMainViewModel).RemoveSelectStatementFromDB += new EventHandler<SelectStatementRemovedEventArgs>(StartVehicleSearch_RemoveSelectStatementFromDB);
        LocalDataToWorkWith.MapTransportClass(dataToWorkWith);
    }

    void StartVehicleSearch_RemoveSelectStatementFromDB(object sender, SelectStatementRemovedEventArgs e)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

But in my opinien there must be some nicer / cleaner / better method to implement this?

Thanks in advance! :)

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This indeed doesn't seem like the right place to use normal events; a couple of other options:

-do not use events but use 'services', imo more clear and more direct while still decoupling. Has the benefit that you can easily test your viewmodel (eg test that executing the Remove command effectively calls Remove on the database) by mocking the database service.

  //a database interface
public interface IDataBase
{
  public void Remove( string entry );
  //etc
}

  //a concrete database
public class SqlDataBase : IDataBase
{
  //implementation of IDataBase
}

  //vm uses an IDataBase
class VehicleSearchViewModel
{
  public VehicleSearchViewModel( IDataBase dataBase );

  private void Remove( string id )
  {
    dataBase.Remove( id );
  }
}

  //so main app can pass it
public StartMyExtensionApplication( .... )
{
  var dataBase = CreateDataBase( .... );
  view.DataContext = new VehicleSearchViewModel( dataBase );
}

-use something like Prism's IEventAggregator

class VehicleSearchViewModel
{
  public VehicleSearchViewModel( IEventAggregator aggr );

  private void Remove( string id )
  {
    aggr.Publish( new RemoveFromDBEvent{ id = id } );
  }
}

public StartMyExtensionApplication( .... )
{
  aggr.Subscribe<RemoveFromDBEvent>( DoRemove );
}

private void DoRemove( RemoveFromDBEvent evt )
{
  dataBase.Remove( evt.id );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer! Thanks. I just still want to find a solution to still have the views datacontext set in XAML. Do you think it would be a "bad" decision to put the dataBase (or the reference to the IEventAggregator) in a property in the VM? –  chiffre Jun 26 '12 at 7:48
    
why exactly do you want that? imo it causes more problems than solutions.. the vm is useless without the dataBase/aggregator so that makes it ideal for a constructor parameter; if they're a property you either should check for null or 'assume' they're fine; if set in xaml, ther is coupling between View and VM since View now needs to know what the VM is; if set in xaml, your app has to get DataContext, hope View did set it then cast it whereas in the other case it controls everything; if set in xaml and you want another VM, you'll have to change in two places (View and app) instead of one (app) –  stijn Jun 26 '12 at 8:20
    
I just liked the way to instantiate the view and everyting's done. But you are right that in this case it will be much more convinient to use the constructor-approach. Thanks! –  chiffre Jun 26 '12 at 8:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.