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Does this work well as a Singleton in actionscript? i.e. are there any gotchas I should be aware of, and is it true that only one instance of AVManager would be created in this case:

Note that I do get the expected output (only one time of "instantiated first time" and numbers follow sequence):

instantiated first time! 1

FILE 1: 2

FILE 2: 3

and finally 4

Here are the files....

AV_CONFIG.as:

package {
    public class AV_CONFIG {
        public static var AVM:AVManager = new AVManager();
    }
}

AVManager.as:

package {
    import flash.events.EventDispatcher;

    public class AVManager extends EventDispatcher {
        public var someConstantData:uint = 1;

        public function AVManager() {
            trace('instantiated first time!', someConstantData);
        }

    }
}

Then:

File1.as:

package {
    import AV_CONFIG;
    import flash.display.Sprite;

    public class File1 extends Sprite {

        public function File1() {
            AV_CONFIG.AVM.someConstantData++
            trace('FILE 1:', AV_CONFIG.AVM.someConstantData);
        }

    }
}

File2.as:

package {
    import AV_CONFIG;
    import flash.display.Sprite;

    public class File2 extends Sprite {

        public function File2() {
            AV_CONFIG.AVM.someConstantData++
            trace('FILE 2:', AV_CONFIG.AVM.someConstantData);
        }

    }
}

Main.as (the DocumentClass):

package {
    import AV_CONFIG;
    import flash.display.Sprite;

    public class Main extends Sprite {

        public function Main() {
            var f1:File1 = new File1();
            var f2:File2 = new File2();
            AV_CONFIG.AVM.someConstantData++
            trace('and finally', AV_CONFIG.AVM.someConstantData);
        }

    }
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Generally with singletons you want to:

  1. Limit or dissolve the ability to create instances of that class.
  2. Create a means of getting an instance of that class statically.

Example:

public class AvManager
{

    private static var _instance:AvManager;
    internal static var created:Boolean = false;

    public function AvManager()
    {
        if(AvManager.created)
        {
            throw new Error("Cannot created instances of AvManager, use AvManager.instance.");
        }

        AvManager.created = true;
    }

    public static function get instance():AvManager
    {
        if(_instance == null)
        {
            _instance = new AvManager();
        }

        return _instance;
    }

    public function test():void
    {
        trace("Working.");
    }

}

Where you could now use:

AvManager.instance.test(); // Working.
share|improve this answer

The biggest gotcha is allowing global access to something if its state can be changed. If this is a project where you expect the codebase to be maintained for longer than a week or so and you think it's likely to have more than 500 lines of code, I'd strongly suggest avoiding doing this--I can tell you from experience that in a large project it can be difficult to impossible to figure out which of the hundreds of Classes that have access to your Singleton made the change to its state that is causing a given bug.

Next, requirements have a way of changing. What if you suddenly need 2 AVManagers? You'll find that you've created so many baked-in references to your static that changing it will blow the entire project to heck. Again, I speak from experience here. If you use dependency injection (which is just a scary way of saying that Classes that need an AVManager have a property that is populated from the outside), then these types of changes become easy...just give them a different AVManager, done.

Finally, if you have any pretensions of wanting to do Test Driven Development, using globals/statics in this way will essentially make all that code untestable. You can't provide an alternate AVManager for testing, since all the Classes with a dependency on it are hard-wired to go get that specific one.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer

Yeah this works fine, a different method is to put an AVManager right in its own class file at the top:

private static var AVM:AVManager = new AVManager();

and get it when required with a function in the AVManager class like this:

public static function GetInstance():AVManager {
    return AVM;
}

This setup isn't necessary but provides some nice little protection by disallowing direct access.

Good luck with your project.

share|improve this answer

See this code as an attempt for creating something different.

An other Singleton in AS3 :

First an Interface :

package test {
public interface Foo {

    function func0():void;

    function func1(arg:String):String;


}
}

And then a Singleton :

package test {
public class BASIC_FOO {
    public static const BASIC_FOO:Foo = new BasicFoo();
}
}

import test.Foo;

class BasicFoo implements Foo {

    public function func0():void {
    }

    public function func1(arg:String):String {
        return arg;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
What is the point of a Singleton that implements an Interface? There is no way to provide an alternate implementation, since Clients are retrieving a specific instance procedurally rather than having it provided to them. –  Amy Blankenship Jun 26 '12 at 12:38
    
ok... then you could replace the 'const' with a function, no ? –  OXMO456 Jun 26 '12 at 13:31
    
He's using the const to provide global access, which is the antithesis of OOP, but I think a const is going to perform better than a static function call, if you want my honest opinion of which form of cyanide makes the healthiest breakfast. –  Amy Blankenship Jun 26 '12 at 22:45
    
@Amy just to makes things clear : I'm not saying that singletons are good (i never use singletons myself). My example was just a try for making a singleton with a sort of private constructor (that why i'm using an interface). I'm not pretending that my exemple is super good or the best one. But i think that this is a sort fo singleton and the question was about creating a Singleton. –  OXMO456 Jun 27 '12 at 12:05

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