Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to write the following in order to get a running total of distinct NumUsers

NumUsers = COUNT(DISTINCT [UserAccountKey]) OVER (ORDER BY [Mth])

...management studio doesn't seem too happy. Take out DISTINCT and the error goes but then it won't be a distinct count.

Is DISTINCT not possible within the partition functions? If so how do I go about finding the distinct count - use a more traditional method such as a correlated subquery?

Looking into this a bit further - Maybe these OVER finctions cannot be used in SQL-Server to calculate running totals; unlike Oracle.

I've added a live example here on SQLfiddle where I try to use a partition function to calculate a running total

share|improve this question
2  
COUNT with ORDER BY instead of PARTITION BY is ill-defined in 2008. I'm surprised it's letting you have it at all. Per the documentation, you're not allowed an ORDER BY for an aggregate function. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 26 '12 at 8:04
    
yep - think I'm getting confused with some oracle functionality; these running totals and running counts will be a little more involved – whytheq Jun 26 '12 at 8:08
    
Vote for this -> connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/254393/… Itzik Ben-Gan raised this way back in 2007. Still hasn't happened – Davos Dec 7 '15 at 3:02
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think the only way of doing this in SQL-Server 2008R2 is to use a correlated subquery, or an outer apply:

SELECT  datekey,
        COALESCE(RunningTotal, 0) AS RunningTotal,
        COALESCE(RunningCount, 0) AS RunningCount,
        COALESCE(RunningDistinctCount, 0) AS RunningDistinctCount
FROM    document
        OUTER APPLY
        (   SELECT  SUM(Amount) AS RunningTotal,
                    COUNT(1) AS RunningCount,
                    COUNT(DISTINCT d2.dateKey) AS RunningDistinctCount
            FROM    Document d2
            WHERE   d2.DateKey <= document.DateKey
        ) rt

SQL Fiddle

This can be done in SQL-Server 2012 using the syntax you have suggested:

SELECT  datekey,
        SUM(Amount) OVER(ORDER BY DateKey) AS RunningTotal
FROM    document

However, use of DISTINCT is still not allowed, so if DISTINCT is required and/or if upgrading isn't an option then I think OUTER APPLY is your best option

share|improve this answer
    
cool thank you. I found this SO answer which features the OUTER APPLY option which I will attempt. Have you seen the looping UPDATE approach in that answer ... it's pretty far out & apparently fast. Life will be easier in 2012 - is that a straight Oracle copy? – whytheq Jun 26 '12 at 10:19

There is a very simple solution using dense_rank()

dense_rank() over (partition by [Mth] order by [UserAccountKey]) 
+ dense_rank() over (partition by [Mth] order by [UserAccountKey] desc) 
- 1

This will give you exactly what you were asking for: The number of distinct UserAccountKeys within each month.

share|improve this answer
8  
One thing to be careful about with dense_rank() is that it will count NULLs whereas COUNT(field) OVER does not. I can't employ it in my solution because of this but I still think it's quite clever. – bf2020 May 16 '14 at 19:23

I use a solution that is similar to that of David above, but with an additional twist if some rows should be excluded from the count. This assumes that [UserAccountKey] is never null.

-- subtract an extra 1 if null was ranked within the partition,
-- which only happens if there were rows where [Include] <> 'Y'
dense_rank() over (
  partition by [Mth] 
  order by case when [Include] = 'Y' then [UserAccountKey] else null end asc
) 
+ dense_rank() over (
  partition by [Mth] 
  order by case when [Include] = 'Y' then [UserAccountKey] else null end desc
)
- max(case when [Include] = 'Y' then 0 else 1 end) over (partition by [Mth])
- 1

An SQL Fiddle with an extended example can be found here.

share|improve this answer

Necromancing:

It's relativiely simple to emulate a count distinct over parition by with DENSE_RANK:

;WITH baseTable AS
(
    SELECT 'RM1' AS RM, 'ADR1' AS ADR
    UNION ALL SELECT 'RM1' AS RM, 'ADR1' AS ADR
    UNION ALL SELECT 'RM2' AS RM, 'ADR1' AS ADR
    UNION ALL SELECT 'RM2' AS RM, 'ADR2' AS ADR
    UNION ALL SELECT 'RM2' AS RM, 'ADR2' AS ADR
    UNION ALL SELECT 'RM2' AS RM, 'ADR3' AS ADR
    UNION ALL SELECT 'RM3' AS RM, 'ADR1' AS ADR
    UNION ALL SELECT 'RM2' AS RM, 'ADR1' AS ADR
    UNION ALL SELECT 'RM3' AS RM, 'ADR1' AS ADR
    UNION ALL SELECT 'RM3' AS RM, 'ADR2' AS ADR
)
,CTE AS
(
    SELECT RM, ADR, DENSE_RANK() OVER(PARTITION BY RM ORDER BY ADR) AS dr 
    FROM baseTable
)
SELECT
     RM
    ,ADR

    ,COUNT(CTE.ADR) OVER (PARTITION BY CTE.RM ORDER BY ADR) AS cnt1 
    ,COUNT(CTE.ADR) OVER (PARTITION BY CTE.RM) AS cnt2 
    -- Geht nicht 
    --,COUNT(DISTINCT CTE.ADR) OVER (PARTITION BY CTE.RM ORDER BY CTE.ADR) AS cntDist
    ,MAX(CTE.dr) OVER (PARTITION BY CTE.RM ORDER BY CTE.RM) AS cntDistEmu 
FROM CTE
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.