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SQL Server doesn't support the "SELECT FOR UPDATE" syntax, which is used by NHibernate for pessimistic locking. I read here on StackOverflow descriptions of other alternatives (I liked the "SELECT WITH (...)" because it's quite close).

however NHibernate doesn't seem to support this syntax.

do you have a workaround for this? I believe this can be achieved by tinkering with NHibernate internals, but that's not cost effective for me at the moment (learning curve). I could also perhaps use a stored procedure with application locks, and access that from NHibernate. any other suggestions? (aside from always reading before writing...)

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Isn't that pessimistic locking? Optimistic locking is when you don't lock upfront, hoping the row doesn't change, and you test for changes in the update. –  Remus Rusanu Jul 13 '09 at 16:12
    
of course, you are right. thanks, editing. –  Yonatan Karni Jul 14 '09 at 8:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

NHibernate has a version strategy for optimistic locking:

http://ayende.com/Blog/archive/2009/04/15/nhibernate-mapping-concurrency.aspx

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thanks, Ayende's blog is great and although I mistakenly asked about optimistic locking (although I need pessimistic lock), this post helped me - since it demonstrated how a session.Get<Person>(1,LockMode.Upgrade); translated to ... FROM ... WITH (updlock, rowlock) - which means NHibernate (at least 2.x) DOES support SQL Server's pessimistic locking syntax. –  Yonatan Karni Jul 14 '09 at 8:55

I don;t know much about NHibernate, but in SQL columns of ROWVERSION type are commonly used to implement optimistic locking. Example here

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