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I have the following manager<->worker situation:

class Manager {
private:
    pthread_attr_t workerSettings;
    pthread_t worker;
    pthread_cond_t condition;
    pthread_mutex_t mutex;
    bool workerRunning;

    static void* worker_function(void* args) {
        Manager* manager = (Manager*)args;

        while(true) {
            while(true) {
                pthread_mutex_lock(&manager->mutex);
                if(/* new data available */)
                {
                    /* copy new data from shared to thread memory */
                    pthread_mutex_unlock(&manager->mutex);
                }
                else
                {
                    pthread_mutex_unlock(&manager->mutex);
                    break;
                }

                /* process the data in thread memory */

                pthread_mutex_lock(&manager->mutex);
                /* copy results back to shared memory */
                pthread_mutex_unlock(&manager->mutex);
            }

            pthread_mutex_lock(&manager->mutex);

            // wait for new data to arrive
            while(manager->workerRunning && !/* new data available*/)
                pthread_cond_wait(&manager->condition, &manager->mutex);

            // check if we should continue running
            if(!manager->workerRunning)
            {
                pthread_mutex_unlock(&manager->mutex);
                break;
            }

            pthread_mutex_unlock(&manager->mutex);
        }

        pthread_exit(NULL);
        return NULL; // just to avoid the missing return statement compiler warning
    }

public:
    Manager() : workerRunning(true) {
        pthread_cond_init(&condition, NULL);
        pthread_mutex_init(&mutex, NULL);
        pthread_attr_init(&workerSettings);
        pthread_attr_setdetachstate(&workerSettings, PTHREAD_CREATE_JOINABLE);
        pthread_create(&worker, &workerSettings, worker_function, (void*)this);
    }

    // this *may* be called repeatedly or very seldom
    void addData(void) {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        /* copy new data into shared memory */
        pthread_cond_signal(&condition);
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
    }

    ~Manager()
    {
        // set workerRunning to false and signal the worker
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        workerRunning = false;
        pthread_cond_signal(&condition);
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);

        // wait for the worker to exit
        pthread_join(worker, NULL);

        // cleanup
        pthread_attr_destroy(&workerSettings);
        pthread_mutex_destroy(&mutex);
        pthread_cond_destroy(&condition);
    }
};

I'm not completely sure about this at several places:

  • Is the fact that Manager spawns a new thread in its constructor considered a bad practice? (I will only have one Manager object, so i guess that should be fine)
  • What about the pthread_exit - i see this in many tutorials but i don't quite get why it should be there? Can't i simply return the function to exit the thread? I also think the return NULL is dead code, but gcc warns when it's missing because it obviously can't know that pthread_exit already killed the thread at that point.
  • About the constructor - can i destroy the thread attr object (workerSettings) immediately after spawning the thread or does it have to stay valid for the entire lifetime of the thread?
  • About the destructor: Is this the right way to do this?

And most importantly:

  • Do your experienced eyes see any synchronization issues there?

Thanks for your help!

share|improve this question
    
Regarding your second point, yes it's enough to just return from a thread. You don't really need pthread_exit unless you need to e.g. exit the thread from a called function. – Joachim Pileborg Jun 26 '12 at 8:14
    
ok, thanks. Is there any deallocation I'm missing? I somehow don't like the fact that the pthread_t object is not destroyed anywhere. – Pontomedon Jun 26 '12 at 8:22
1  
It should be "destroyed" by the pthread_join call. – Joachim Pileborg Jun 26 '12 at 8:27
    
Busy-waiting is never OK, plus it's not clear what is its intended purpose in this code. Why do you want the worker to go into some particular state before calling pthread_join? – n.m. Jun 26 '12 at 8:38
    
I want the worker to be hung in the pthread_cond_wait call, because otherwise it could miss the signal and cause a deadlock (worker hung in pthread_cond_wait, main thread hung in pthread_join) edit: i guess i could add another if(workerRunning) before the pthread_cond_wait call to fix this.. – Pontomedon Jun 26 '12 at 8:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You ask...

Is the fact that Manager spawns a new thread in its constructor considered a bad practice?

In most cases, RAII is good enough to approach the object creation and resource acquisition. In some cases you may want to achieve the deferred resource initialization: when you first construct an object and later you proceed with the initialization. This can be achieved, for example, via a ctor (either default or parameterized) and open/start routines. Though you may also do it in the ctor and achieve the deffered object creation by allocating the object in the process heap (via operator new). It depends on your requirements, software design considerations and corporate software development standards. So, you may create a thread in ctor, or may want or need to spawn it in the later stage of the application/object lifecycle.

What about the pthread_exit

It is not required. It terminates the calling thread, making its exit status available to any waiting threads (i.e. via pthread_join()). An implicit call to pthread_exit() occurs when any thread returns from its start routine. Basically, the pthread_exit() function provides an interface similar to exit() but on a per-thread basis (including cancelation cleanup handlers). But beware of calling pthread_exit() from cancelation cleanup handlers or from destructors of objects allocated in the TSD (thread-specific data area) - it can lead to undesirable side effects.

About the constructor - can i destroy the thread attr object (workerSettings) immediately after spawning the thread or does it have to stay valid for the entire lifetime of the thread?

Yes, you can destroy it right away: it will not affect already created threads.

About the destructor: Is this the right way to do this?

Same thing as for ctor: you may use dtor and close/stop routine or can do it all in the dtor: depends on your specific needs (e.g. object reusability etc). Just make the dtor not throw.

Do your experienced eyes see any synchronization issues there?

I may suggest using pthread_testcancel(), to introduce the explicit cancelation point in a thread, and issue pthread_cancel() + pthread_join() (should return PTHREAD_CANCELED) in the control thread to stop the child thread, instead of synch variable workerRunning. Of course, if it is applicable in your case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your answer, i didn't know about the possibility to cancel a thread. This is much more elegant solution than the two bools i used. To sum it up - i do a pthread_testcancel() in the child thread right before waiting for the signal (with the mutex being unlocked) and in the dtor i issue pthread_cancel, then i issue a signal (with lock/unlock around it) in case the child thread was currently waiting and then continue to join the child thread. – Pontomedon Jun 26 '12 at 11:07
    
In the parent thread you do: pthread_create(&tid); pthread_cancel(tid); pthread_join(tid, &status); In the child thread you do (instead of code under "check if we should continue running"): pthread_testcancel(); No need to use a mutex. pthread_testcancel() tests if a cancelation signal has been sent by the control thread and does not return if it has got one. The cancelation is pending until the child thread checks for it using pthread_testcancel. You may want to install a cleanup routine using pthread_cleanup_push: code after pthread_testcancel won't be executed. The thread is terminated. – Oleg Jun 26 '12 at 13:34
    
pthread_cond_wait() is a cancellation point, so no need for an explicit ptthread_testcancel – Jonathan Wakely Jun 26 '12 at 15:41
1  
unfortunately i discovered that androids bionic libc doesn't support the cancelation api, so i'm stuck with the bool thingy.. but i updated the code to handle spurious signals and removed the now-unused workerWaiting flag, looks a lot cleaner now. – Pontomedon Jun 27 '12 at 7:45

You should check for new data as soon as pthread_cond_wait returns, and wait again if there's no new data. That can happen if you get a spurious wake (think of it as the kernel accidentally waking you up by dropping something heavy down the stairs), and it would be better to wait immediately instead of changing workerWaiting then unlocking and relocking the mutex twice before waiting again.

An RAII lock type would make the code so much cleaner:

    while(true) {
        while(true) {
            {
                scoped_lock l(&manager->mutex);
                if(/* new data available */)
                {
                    /* copy new data from shared to thread memory */
                }
                else
                    break;
            }

            /* process the data in thread memory */

            scoped_lock l(&manager->mutex);
            /* copy results back to shared memory */
        }

        scoped_lock l(&manager->mutex);
        // check if we should continue running
        if(!manager->workerRunning)
            break;

        // wait for new data to arrive
        manager->workerWaiting = true;
        while (!/* new data available */)
            pthread_cond_wait(&manager->condition, &manager->mutex);
        manager->workerWaiting = false;
    }

Using pthread_cancel as Oleg suggests would simplify it even further.

Following your edit to the code to handle spurious wake-ups, it becomes much simpler if you use RAII and restructure it:

    while(true)
    {
        {
            scoped_lock l(&manager->mutex);
            // wait for new data to arrive
            while(manager->workerRunning && !/* new data available*/)
                pthread_cond_wait(&manager->condition, &manager->mutex);

            // check if we should continue running
            if(!manager->workerRunning)
                break;

            /* copy new data from shared to thread memory */
        }

        /* process the data in thread memory */

        scoped_lock l(&manager->mutex);
        /* copy results back to shared memory */
    }
    return NULL;

Without something like scoped_lock, what happens if /* copy new data from shared to thread memory */ or /* process the data in thread memory */ throws an exception? You'll never unlock the mutex.

The RAII type could be as simple as:

struct scoped_lock {
  explicit scoped_lock(pthrad_mutex_t* m) : mx(m) {
    pthread_mutex_lock(mx);
  }
  ~scoped_lock() { pthread_mutex_unlock(mx); }
private:
  pthread_mutex_t* mx;
  scoped_lock(const scoped_lock&);
  scoped_lock operator=(const scoped_lock&);
};
share|improve this answer
    
hm that sure looks like an interesting concept. I'm not able to use boost, but it shouldn't be too hard to implement such a scoped lock anyway. – Pontomedon Jun 27 '12 at 7:54
1  
I wasn't suggesting using boost, its scoped_lock works with a boost::mutex anyway, not a pthread_mutex_t. RAII is essential for simple, correct C++ code. – Jonathan Wakely Jun 27 '12 at 7:58
    
oh alright, i was just googling for scoped_lock :) I'll read that wiki page. – Pontomedon Jun 27 '12 at 8:04
    
see the simplified example above too – Jonathan Wakely Jun 27 '12 at 8:12
    
Wow your simplification is really neat, and I also like the RAII concept, it opens up a whole new range of possibilities! Thanks a lot for your help! – Pontomedon Jun 28 '12 at 9:43

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