Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written a Java server application that runs on a standard virtual hosted Linux solution. The application runs all the time listening for socket connections and creating new handlers for them. It's a server side implementation to a client-server application.

The way I start it is by including it in the start up rc.local script of the server. However once started I don't know how to access it to stop it and if I want to install an update, so I have to restart the server in order to restart the application.

On a windows pc, for this type of application I might create a windows service and then I can stop and start it as I want. Is there anything like that on a Linux box so that if I start this application I can stop it and restart it without doing a complete restart of the server.

My application is called WebServer.exe. It is started on server startup by including it in my rc.local as such:

java -jar /var/www/vhosts/myweb.com/phpserv/WebServer.jar &

I'm a bit of a noob at linux so any example would be appreciated with any posts. However I do have SSH, and full FTP access to the box to install any updates as well as access to a Plesk panel.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

I wrote another simple wrapper here:

#!/bin/sh
SERVICE_NAME=MyService
PATH_TO_JAR=/usr/local/MyProject/MyJar.jar
PID_PATH_NAME=/tmp/MyService-pid
case $1 in
    start)
        echo "Starting $SERVICE_NAME ..."
        if [ ! -f $PID_PATH_NAME ]; then
            nohup java -jar $PATH_TO_JAR /tmp 2>> /dev/null >> /dev/null &
                        echo $! > $PID_PATH_NAME
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME started ..."
        else
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME is already running ..."
        fi
    ;;
    stop)
        if [ -f $PID_PATH_NAME ]; then
            PID=$(cat $PID_PATH_NAME);
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME stoping ..."
            kill $PID;
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME stopped ..."
            rm $PID_PATH_NAME
        else
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME is not running ..."
        fi
    ;;
    restart)
        if [ -f $PID_PATH_NAME ]; then
            PID=$(cat $PID_PATH_NAME);
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME stopping ...";
            kill $PID;
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME stopped ...";
            rm $PID_PATH_NAME
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME starting ..."
            nohup java -jar $PATH_TO_JAR /tmp 2>> /dev/null >> /dev/null &
                        echo $! > $PID_PATH_NAME
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME started ..."
        else
            echo "$SERVICE_NAME is not running ..."
        fi
    ;;
esac 
share|improve this answer
    
@PbxMan thanks for this. I might give it a go and see how we get on. Cheers. –  dreza Jan 22 at 20:52

Linux service init script are stored into /etc/init.d. You can copy and customize /etc/init.d/skeleton file, and then call

service [yourservice] start|stop|restart

see http://www.ralfebert.de/blog/java/debian_daemon/. Its for Debian (so, Ubuntu as well) but fit more distribution.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks promising. I will be taking a closer look into this. cheers –  dreza Jun 26 '12 at 9:43

A simple solution is to create a script start.sh that runs Java through nohup and then stores the PID to a file:

nohup java -jar myapplication.jar > log.txt 2> errors.txt < /dev/null &
PID=$!
echo $PID > pid.txt

Then your stop script stop.sh would read the PID from the file and kill the application:

PID=$(cat pid.txt)
kill $PID

Of course I've left out some details, like checking whether the process exists and removing pid.txt if you're done.

share|improve this answer
1  
Question: Wouldn't the kill $PID command cause the process to be killed without finishing? I'm writing a server program that interfaces with a database, and I would want all currently running threads to finish before the program exits, so as to ensure that the program doesn't die in the middle of a write to the DB or something. –  Scuba Steve Dec 12 '13 at 4:29
    
@scuba-steve sort of. kill will send the TERM signal, which will invoke any shutdown hooks that are in place, so use them to end your process gracefully. They won't execute if the process gets a kill signal (i.e., kill -9). The OS may interrupt your shutdown hooks if they're taking too long to complete, so keep them succinct –  rjohnston May 30 at 4:44

Another alternative, which is also quite popular is the Java Service Wrapper. This is also quite popular around the OSS community.

share|improve this answer
    
Cheers. I had seen some mention of that. Will take a closer look. –  dreza Jun 26 '12 at 9:42

You can use Thrift server or JMX to communicate with your Java service.

share|improve this answer

However once started I don't know how to access it to stop it

You can write a simple stop script that greps for your java process, extracts the PID and calls kill on it. It's not fancy, but it's straight forward. Something like that may be of help as a start:

#!/bin/bash
PID = ps ax | grep "name of your app" | cut -d ' ' -f 1
kill $PID
share|improve this answer
2  
I'm not very good in linux but doesn't pkill nameofprocess do about the same thing ? –  dystroy Jun 26 '12 at 19:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.