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void fn(string &s)
{
    //....
}

//use the function    
fn("helloworld");

Firstly, it's wrong to initiate a non-const string with a const char string.

After I add const in the parameter, it compiles.

But is it right to reference a temporary object string("helloworld") on stack?

Is it sure that string("helloworld") gets called?

--

edits.

If a temporary string is created, how the compiler judges that the object string("helloworld") is const from the constructor of std::string(const char*)?

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If you are asking if a string object will be created from the const char* then the answer is yes, and you can safely use that string inside your function. –  Dennis Jun 26 '12 at 8:39
    
A temporary object is created: conversion by constructor. The std::string destructor is called at the end of the scope of the object - when fn() returns. –  Brett Hale Jun 26 '12 at 8:42

3 Answers 3

But is it right to reference a temporary object string("helloworld") on stack?

Yes, as long as the reference is const, the lifetime of the temporary will be extended.

Is it sure that string("helloworld") gets called?

Yes, a temporary is created using the conversion constructor std::string(const char*). Note however that the compiler can optimize this step out.

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How can the compiler optimize out a conversion? If the called function expects an std::string, and you give it a char const[], something has to happen. –  James Kanze Jun 26 '12 at 8:58
    
@JamesKanze what if the function is inline and does nothing? –  Luchian Grigore Jun 26 '12 at 9:01
    
Any optimization would have to come under the "as if" rule. If the compiler can determine that the observable behavior of the program would be unchanged, it can do anything. In this case, it would have to determine that there was no "observable behavior" in the constructor and destructor that it wouldn't be calling. (In theory, this is very simple in this case: std::string is part of the standard library, and the compiler is allowed to magically know everything about them. As far as I know, none do, although in the case of std::string, this would make a lot of sense.) –  James Kanze Jun 26 '12 at 10:58
    
@JamesKanze the last phrase is just there to reflect this corner case, to fully answer the OP's last question. It's somewhat useless info, I agree, but there for completeness. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 26 '12 at 11:00
    
@LuchianGrigore If a temporary string is created, how the compiler judge that the object string("helloworld") is const from the constructor of std::string. –  upton Jun 26 '12 at 15:14

But is it right to reference a temporary object string("helloworld") on stack?

In this case, probably, but you do have to pay attention to the lifetime of the object. The temporary will cease to exist at the end of the full expression; if fn saves a pointer or a reference to it, you're in trouble. This is typically not a problem with a free function, like your fn (but it can be); it could be a problem if the temporary were an argument to a constructor in a new expression (but the author of the class should document any lifetime requirements which go beyond the constructor invocation).

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That's a good point, +1 from me ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 26 '12 at 9:11

But is it right to reference a temporary object string("helloworld") on stack?

Yes, why not?

Is it sure that string("helloworld") gets called?

Yes, as long string provides an implicit constructor using a const char* argument this is garuanteed (std::string does so).

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