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class IA
{
public:
    virtual void a() = 0;
};

class A: public IA
{
public:
    virtual void a()
    {
    }
};

class IB
{
public:
    virtual void b() = 0;
};

class B: public IB, public A
{
public:
    virtual void b()
    {
    }
};

void f(IA* p)
{

}

int main() 
{
    B b = B();
    IB* p = &b;
    f(p);
}

Is this the correct way to implement interfaces with inheritance in C++? If so, how do I get the line f(p); in my code to compile? Basically, I would like if IB could inherit from IA but this will cause problems for B.

UPDATE

What I want is for IB to include IA's interface, as follows. However this code wont compile since IA::a() and A::a() conflict with each other. What should I do?

class IA
{
public:
    virtual void a() = 0;
};

class A: public IA
{
public:
    virtual void a()
    {
    }
};

class IB : public IA
{
public:
    virtual void b() = 0;
};

class B: public IB, public A
{
public:
    virtual void b()
    {
    }
};

UPDATE 2

This compiles, does it look correct? Do I need all these virtuals

class IA
{
public:
    virtual void a() = 0;
};

class A: virtual public IA
{
public:
    virtual void a()
    {
    }
};

class IB: virtual public IA
{
public:
    virtual void b() = 0;
};

class B: virtual public IB, public A
{
public:
    virtual void b()
    {
    }
};
share|improve this question
1  
IB and IA are no way related to each other.It is difficult to know what you are trying to do with passing IB* where the function expects IA* –  Alok Save Jun 26 '12 at 9:38
    
Why don't you pass &b directly into f? –  unkulunkulu Jun 26 '12 at 9:39
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, this is the right way of course, but the line f(p) should not compile as is, imagine classes that implement IB, but don't implement IA, it's possible, so you cannot assume that they all implement IA. If you want to assume that, you can inherit IB from IA, but this is another design. It can be implemented like this:

class IA
{
public:
    virtual void a() = 0;
};

class A: virtual public IA
{
public:
    virtual void a()
    {
    }
};

class IB : virtual public IA
{
public:
    virtual void b() = 0;
};

class B: public IB, public A
{
public:
    virtual void b()
    {
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I can inherit IB form IA - which is exactly the design I want. But what should B then inherit from if it is to implement the IB interface and get A's implementation? –  Baz Jun 26 '12 at 9:43
    
@Baz, doesn't virtual inheritance from IA help? –  unkulunkulu Jun 26 '12 at 9:46
    
Yes! Virtual inheritance is what I'm looking for. Is it good practice to always inherit interfaces as virtual? –  Baz Jun 26 '12 at 9:54
    
@Baz, this is another question really, would you always inherit all interfaces virtually. I would not probably do this in every case, but when I expect extensions of particular interface by other interfaces, probably. You can start a new question for this. –  unkulunkulu Jun 26 '12 at 9:59
    
Will do! Thank. –  Baz Jun 26 '12 at 10:17
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