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I have coded a background logging thread for my program, if a class needs a logger it pulls it from my threadpool, so for each filename there is only one log running. The class, adds anything which needs to be logged via log(String).

Anyway whenever I set logging on and it runs the writetolog() after a while I get heapoutofmemory exception. This is caused by the log threads, but I can't see where the memory leak is, and I am not that great at threading. My only idea is that it is in the buffered writer?

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;

import java.io.FileWriter;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue;

public class Log extends Thread{
private String file;
private BlockingQueue<String> pq = new LinkedBlockingQueue<String>();
private BufferedWriter bw;
private boolean Writing;

@Depreciated
public Log(){
    super();
    file = "log.txt";

    start(); 
}

public Log(ThreadGroup tg, String fileName){
    super(tg,fileName);
    file = fileName;
    try {
        new File(file).createNewFile();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    start(); 
}

public Log(String fileName){
    file = fileName;
    try {
        new File(file).createNewFile();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    start(); 
}

@Override
public void run(){
    //System.out.println("Log Thread booted " +file);

    while(Run.running){
        if (!Writing){
            if(Run.logging)
            writeToLog();
        }
        try{
            Thread.sleep(500);
        }catch(InterruptedException e){
            Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
            break;
        }


    }
    //System.out.println("Log Thread shutting down " +file);
}

public synchronized void log(String s){
    if(Run.logging)
    pq.add(s);
}

private void writeToLog(){
    try{
        Writing = true;

        bw = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(file, true));
    while(!pq.isEmpty()){

            bw.write(Calendar.getInstance().getTime().toString() +" " +pq.poll());
            bw.newLine();

    }

    bw.flush();
    bw.close();
    Writing = false;
    }catch(Exception e){Writing = false; e.printStackTrace();}
}



}

EDIT - It is worth mentioning as well that in the context of the program it is logging 100's - 1000's of lines

Many thanks Sam

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If your background thread doesn't write to the disk fast enough, the LinkedBlockingQueue (whose capacity you left unspecified) will grow until it contains Integer.MAX_VALUE strings. That's too much for your java heap size.

Specify a capacity so that, in case of a full queue, the thread calling the log method will wait while some part of the queued log is dumped on disk :

private BlockingQueue<String> pq = new LinkedBlockingQueue<String>(1000);

Use put instead of add in the log method so that the logging operation waits instead of throwing an exception.

(did you notice that you write the time at writing on disk instead of the time at logging ?)

share|improve this answer
    
yes this partially solves the problem that my que is overflowing, but what is the correct way to allow the que to then clear before adding? –  Sam Palmer Jun 26 '12 at 11:49
    
Because at the moment I now get an illegalstate exception - queue full –  Sam Palmer Jun 26 '12 at 11:52
1  
And use put instead of add. –  Denys Séguret Jun 26 '12 at 12:01
    
thank you I am nearly there now, only problem is that now my blockingqueue seems to full straight away but contains nothing in it? –  Sam Palmer Jun 26 '12 at 12:17
1  
Glad to hear it :) Be careful not to make it more complex : at some point it would be saner to use an existing logging framework. –  Denys Séguret Jun 26 '12 at 12:20

I believe having private BufferedWriter bw; as member variable is causing the trouble. Since you are only using it in your writeToLog() function there is no reason for it to be a member variable and get instantiated every time by multiple threads. Creating BufferedWriter within the function will GC the object as soon as it goes out of scope.

private void writeToLog(){ 
    try{ 
        Writing = true; 

        BufferedWriter bw = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(file, true)); 
    while(!pq.isEmpty()){ 

            bw.write(Calendar.getInstance().getTime().toString() +" " +pq.poll()); 
            bw.newLine(); 

    } 

    bw.flush(); 
    bw.close(); 
    Writing = false; 
    }catch(Exception e){Writing = false; e.printStackTrace();} 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I have just tried this and it still runsoutofheap, good idea though –  Sam Palmer Jun 26 '12 at 11:46

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