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class IA
{
public:
    virtual void a() = 0;
};

class A: virtual public IA
{
public:
    virtual void a()
    {
    }
};

class IB: virtual public IA
{
public:
    virtual void b() = 0;
};

class B: virtual public IB, public A
{
public:
    virtual void b()
    {
    }
};

Do you always inherit your interfaces as virtual as I do above? If not, how would you impement the above code?

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1  
Take a look at this –  Mohammad Jun 26 '12 at 10:22
    
possible duplicate of In C++, what is a virtual base class? –  badgerr Jun 26 '12 at 10:25
    
If the hierarchy has to be like that, then virtual inheritance is the only choice, but in most cases in C++ you don't end up with that type of design. There are few cases where I have used virtual inheritance in my professional life... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 26 '12 at 12:39
    
This kind of design happens, but hopefully very rarely. In any case, it has to be thought beforehand, and weighed against other possibilities, since sometimes you can't just add virtual to third party code. –  Alexandre C. Jun 26 '12 at 14:33
1  
@David Rodríguez But if I'm using inheritance between interfaces then I will have to use virtual inheritence, as in the example above, right? What design alternatives do I have? –  Baz Jun 28 '12 at 11:28
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1 Answer

There is one relatively clean workaround. When you inherit B from IB, the compiler requires your provide an implementation of all abstract methods from IB including IA. As a() is already implemented in A, you can create a stub in B that simply invokes a method from A:

class IA
{
public:
    virtual void a() = 0;
};

class A: public IA
{
public:
    virtual void a()
    {
    }
};

class IB: public IA
{
public:
    virtual void b() = 0;
};

class B: public IB, public A
{
public:
    virtual void b()
    {
    }

    virtual void a()
    {
        A::a();
    }
};
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As long as you do not often want to pass a B instance to a function taking a IA&... –  curiousguy Jul 26 '12 at 8:27
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