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I have 2 tables: items and items_purchased. The tag name and other descriptive information is in the items table and the # of purchases for each item is saved in the items_purchased table. The tables are JOINed on item_id.

Here's my query so far:

(select *, sum(purchaseyesno) as tots from items join items_purchased on items.item_id=items_purchased.item_id where tag = 'History' and deleted!=1 and pub_priv!=1    order by tots desc limit 1)
UNION ALL
(select *, sum(purchaseyesno) as tots from items join items_purchased on items.item_id=items_purchased.item_id where tag = 'Medicine' and deleted!=1 and pub_priv!=1  order by tots desc limit 1)
UNION ALL
(select *, sum(purchaseyesno) as tots from items join items_purchased on items.item_id=items_purchased.item_id where tag = 'Biology' and deleted!=1 and pub_priv!=1  order by tots desc limit 1)
//... more tags (20 in all) would follow

The problem is that items with certain tags haven't been purchased yet so the query throws an error of Column "item_id" cannot be null.

here's the sample tables:

            items              |     items_purchased   |   
  item_id   tag      title     | item_id  purchaseyesno|
    1     Biology  DNA is cool |    1         1        | 
    2     Medicine  Doctors    |    2         1        |  
    3      Law    Laws are cool|    4         1        |    
    4     Biology DNA NOT cool |    1         1        |

Sample results:

item_id   tag       title      tots
  1      Biology   DNA is cool  2
  2      Medicine  Doctors      1
  3       Law   Laws are cool   0

2 questions:

  1. How can I exclude one of these SELECT statements if the results of it will be NULL?
  2. Is there a better way to do this query rather than 20 select statements joined by 19 UNION ALLs?
share|improve this question
    
dont you have a master table of tags? –  Sashi Kant Jun 26 '12 at 10:35
    
I could but don't have one yet, i'm still thinking of how to build my schema –  tim peterson Jun 26 '12 at 10:36
    
Using the aggregate function SUM without GROUP BY implicitly groups on all rows; selecting * results in an indeterminate record being retrieved (see the manual for more information)... can you show sample table data and sample desired results? –  eggyal Jun 26 '12 at 10:37
    
yes, i'll add sample table data/results now... –  tim peterson Jun 26 '12 at 10:38
    
check my answer.. –  Sashi Kant Jun 26 '12 at 10:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You simply want to group your results—nothing more complicated than that (no UNION in sight!):

SELECT   items.*, SUM(purchaseyesno) AS tots
FROM     items JOIN items_purchased USING (item_id)
GROUP BY item_id

UPDATE

Following the comments beneath and the update to the OP's question, it's clear that the problem is more complicated than first thought: it is, in fact, a special case of the group-wise maximum problem.

However, the column over which the maximum must be taken is itself the result of another group-wise aggregation (the summation of purchaseyesno).

Therefore, one's query becomes rather inelegant with subqueries:

SELECT *
FROM (
  SELECT   items.*, IFNULL(SUM(purchaseyesno),0) AS tots
  FROM     items LEFT JOIN items_purchased ON folder_id = item_id
  GROUP BY item_id
) AS t NATURAL JOIN (
  SELECT tag, MAX(tots) AS tots
  FROM (
    SELECT   items.*, IFNULL(SUM(purchaseyesno),0) AS tots
    FROM     items LEFT JOIN items_purchased ON folder_id = item_id
    GROUP BY item_id
  ) AS u
  GROUP BY tag
) AS v
GROUP BY tag

See it on sqlfiddle.

What's happening here is that (using an outer join to include records such as Law that have no references in the items_purchased table), we take the sum of purchases for each item (materialised table u) and then determine the maximum number of purchases for items with the same tag name.

We then join the result (materialised table v) back with the first table (u, materialised again as table t) on both tag name and number of purchases.

Finally we group the results again by tag to ensure that, if multiple items having the same tag have the same number of maximal purchases, only one of them is returned indeterminately.

share|improve this answer
    
It wont be a simple join, since you will get item3 too –  Sashi Kant Jun 26 '12 at 10:57
    
@SashiKant: The OP's desired resultset omits item_id=3, so I have used an inner join rather than an outer one. This achieves exactly what was desired. See it on sqlfiddle. –  eggyal Jun 26 '12 at 10:59
    
@eggyal thanks for your answer, i oversimplified my question for the point of demonstration. Can you tell me how your query would look it the items table item_id was actually called folder_id but the items_purchased is still called item_id? –  tim peterson Jun 26 '12 at 11:01
    
@timpeterson: In that case, just go back to using ON instead of USING: ... FROM items JOIN items_purchased ON items.folder_id = items_purchased.item_id ... –  eggyal Jun 26 '12 at 11:03
    
hmm, the result of your query almost looks right, there are a few result rows with the same tag name. Would I use a LIMIT 1 somewhere to restrict to just the ones with the highest tots? –  tim peterson Jun 26 '12 at 11:07

Create a master table tags , and store its id in the table it is used as name. Then the below query will be the solution of your problem..

select *, sum(purchaseyesno) as tots 
from items left join 
items_purchased ip on (items.item_id=items_purchased.item_id)
inner join tag_table on (tag_table.id=tagId)
where  deleted!=1 and pub_priv!=1 and not items.item_id is null group by tagID
share|improve this answer
    
-@sashi thanks! i'm generating sample table data/results but will do that in the next few minutes.. –  tim peterson Jun 26 '12 at 10:47
    
This query still returns indeterminate results, as mentioned in my comment above. –  eggyal Jun 26 '12 at 10:47
    
@eggyal: Please check my query properly, coz I have used group by –  Sashi Kant Jun 26 '12 at 10:50
    
ok giving @SashiKant's solution a try now, hold on... –  tim peterson Jun 26 '12 at 10:51
    
Whilst your use of GROUP BY means that the results are no longer implicitly grouped on all rows, selecting ungrouped columns will be indeterminate (unless all records are the same on that column). –  eggyal Jun 26 '12 at 10:51

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