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I have a module that iterates through the public properties of an object (using Type.GetProperties()), and performs various operations on these properties. However, sometimes some of the properties should be handled differently, e.g., ignored. For example, suppose I have the following class:

class TestClass
{
  public int Prop1 { get; set; }
  public int Prop2 { get; set; }
}

Now, I would like to be able to specify that whenever my module gets an object of type TestClass, the property Prop2 should be ignored. Ideally I would like to be able to say something like this:

ReflectionIterator.AddToIgnoreList(TestClass::Prop2);

but that obviously doesn't work. I know I can get a PropertyInfo object if I first make an instance of the class, but it doesn't seem right to create an artificial instance just to do this. Is there any other way I can get a PropertyInfo-object for TestClass::Prop2?

(For the record, my current solution uses string literals, which are then compared with each property iterated through, like this:

ReflectionIterator.AddToIgnoreList("NamespaceName.TestClass.Prop2");

and then when iterating over the properties:

foreach (var propinfo in obj.GetProperties())
{
  if (ignoredProperties.Contains(obj.GetType().FullName + "." + propinfo.Name))
    // Ignore
  // ...
}

but this solution seems a bit messy and error-prone...)

share|improve this question
List<PropertyInfo> ignoredList = ...

ignoredList.Add(typeof(TestClass).GetProperty("Prop2"));

should do the job... just check whether ignoredList.Contains(propinfo)

share|improve this answer
    
Wow that was quick, thank you! – Henrik Berg Jun 26 '12 at 10:51
    
BTW, any way to avoid the string? So that the comiler & intellisense will be able to help me? – Henrik Berg Jun 26 '12 at 10:52
    
stackoverflow.com/a/388841/781792 answers that. – Tim S. Jun 26 '12 at 11:26

Could you add attributes to the properties to define how they should be used? eg

class TestClass
{
  public int Prop1 { get; set; }

  [Ignore]
  public int Prop2 { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestion, I might end up going in this direction. However, for the moment I am not sure I'll have control over every object I might get, so I may not be able to add attributes. – Henrik Berg Jun 26 '12 at 11:05

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