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Model:

class Contact < ActiveRecord::Base
  validates :gender, :inclusion => { :in => ['male', 'female'] }
end

Migration:

class CreateContacts < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table "contacts", :force => true do |t|
      t.string  "gender",  :limit => 6, :default => 'male'
    end
  end
end

RSpec test:

describe Contact do
  it { should validate_inclusion_of(:gender).in(['male', 'female']) }
end

Result:

Expected Contact to be valid when gender is set to ["male", "female"]

Anybody has an idea why this spec doesn't pass? Or can anybody reconstruct and (in)validate it? Thank you.

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1  
which of the various gems that add a validate_inclusion_of matcher are you using? –  Frederick Cheung Jun 26 '12 at 11:41
    
Oh, there are several of them? I use the Remarkable Gem: gem 'remarkable', '>=4.0.0.alpha2' gem 'remarkable_activemodel', '>=4.0.0.alpha2' gem 'remarkable_activerecord', '>=4.0.0.alpha2' –  Joshua Muheim Jun 26 '12 at 11:58

2 Answers 2

I usually prefer to test these things directly. Example:

%w!male female!.each do |gender|
  it "should validate inclusion of #{gender}" do
    model = Model.new(:gender => gender)
    model.save
    model.errors[:gender].should be_blank
  end
end

%w!foo bar!.each do |gender|
  it "should validate inclusion of #{gender}" do
    model = Model.new(:gender => gender)
    model.save
    model.errors[:gender].should_not be_blank
  end
end
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Thank you, this is a useful snippet. Still I'd like to have the matcher working... –  Joshua Muheim Jun 27 '12 at 11:13
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I misunderstood how the .in(..) should be used. I thought I could pass an array of values, but it seems it does only accept a single value:

describe Contact do
  ['male', 'female'].each do |gender|
    it { should validate_inclusion_of(:gender).in(gender) }
  end
end

I don't really know what's the difference to using allow_value though:

['male', 'female'].each do |gender|
  it { should allow_value(gender).for(:gender) }
end

And I guess it's always a good idea to check for some not allowed values, too:

[:no, :valid, :gender].each do |gender| it { should_not validate_inclusion_of(:gender).in(gender) } end

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