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regarding modulus operation

  • somenumber % 10 = less than 10
  • somenumber % 15 = less than 15
  • somenumber % 23 = less than 23
  • somenumber % 55 = less than 55 ... ...

and so on, you get the point right? Please explain

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closed as not a real question by Daniel Fischer, sepp2k, woodchips, AakashM, Luksprog Jun 26 '12 at 14:36

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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A bit of searching before posting would have lead to this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation –  fero Jun 26 '12 at 11:37
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Please explain what ? –  AakashM Jun 26 '12 at 11:45
    
-1 What are you asking? –  Emil Vikström Jun 26 '12 at 12:17

2 Answers 2

its somenumber divided by the number on the right hand side of the mod function, except rather than the number of times it divides, it's the remainder that is left over.

i.e.

15 % 10 = 5 (10 divides into 15 once, and a remainder of 5 is left) 249 % 120 = 9 (120 divides into 249 twice, and a remainder of 9)

hope that helps

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It is simply used to provide the remainder after integer division, and therefore the result HAS to be less than the denominator otherwise you could end up with nonsense like

    20 / 7 = 1 remainder 13

which is not particularly useful.

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