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What is considered better style for an event definition:

public event Action<object, double> OnNumberChanged;

or

public delegate void DNumberChanged(object sender, double number);
public event DNumberChanged OnNumberChanged;

The first takes less typing, but the delegate one gives names to the parameters. As I type this, I think number 2 is the winner, but I could be wrong.

Edit: A different (third) approach is the winner. Read below.

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1  
By accepting "number 3" you made it "number 1". Sequences don't survive long due to voting and acceptances. –  Brad Bruce Jul 13 '09 at 16:59
1  
As mentioned below, use of EventHandler<T> is best for clarity. For what its worth, I maintain a library hosted on CodePlex that will allow you to convert uses of EventHandler<T> to Action<object, T> and vice versa. See jolt.codeplex.com/Wiki/View.aspx?title=Jolt.Functional for more information. –  Steve Guidi Jul 13 '09 at 17:00
    
@Brad Bruce, he isn't referring to the answer sequence, but a third technique different to the his original 2 ideas. I've reworded the question and accepted answer slightly to be clearer. –  Aardvark Oct 18 '10 at 16:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Neither 1 or 2. A third option is the winner

public event EventHandler<NumberChangedEventArgs> NumberChanged;

You're breaking a number of style guidelines for developing in C#, such as using a type for event args that doesn't extend EventArgs.

Yes, you can do it this way, as the compiler doesn't care. However, people reading your code will do a WTF.

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+1 for style guidelines reference. I just would like to add that custom EventArgs might not be needed for property change notification event, because the change should have been reflected through the sender's property already. –  tia Oct 18 '10 at 16:31

Don't create a new type if you don't have to. I think this is better:

public event Action<object, double> OnNumberChanged;

The reason that the Action and Func delegate families exist is to serve this very purpose and reduce the need for new delegate type creation by developers.

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Agree with this one, one less line of code to maintain. –  Tristan Warner-Smith Jul 20 '09 at 10:58

Typically I stick to using an EventArgs derived class as the argument. It makes the code much more consistent.

I have a class:

public class ApplyClickedEventArgs : EventArgs  
{  
   ...
}

and a handler:

void cpy_ApplyClicked(object sender, ApplyClickedEventArgs e)  
{  
   ...  
}

The declaration is:

public event EventHandler<ApplyClickedEventArgs> ApplyClicked;
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As with all questions about coding style. Pick the one you prefer, or that your team prefers, and keep it consistent throughout the project. As long as everyone who needs to can read it efficiently you will be fine.

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I think option 1 is better if I were to choose, but IIRC, the official guidelines for events state that your second parameter has to be a class with the name XxxEventArgs, and should have EventArgs up in its inheritance chain.

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1  
Yes you are right. They also advise that you do not start the event with the name "On", but you reserve this for the protected method that is used to raise your event. –  Rob Levine Jul 13 '09 at 16:55

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