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The move in recent versions of Python to passing a key function to sort() from the previous cmp function is making it trickier for me to perform complex sorts on certain objects.

For example, I want to sort a set of objects from newest to oldest, with a set of string tie-breaker fields. So I want the dates in reverse order but the strings in their natural order. With a comparison function I can just reverse the comparison for the date field compared to the string fields. But with a key function I need to find some way to invert/reverse either the dates or the strings.

It's easy (although ugly) to do with numbers - just subtract them from something - but do I have to find a similar hack for dates (subtract them from another date and compare the timedeltas?) and strings (...I have no idea how I'd reverse their order in a locale-independent way).

I know of the existence of functools.cmp_to_key() but it is described as being "primarily used as a transition tool for programs being converted to Python 3 where comparison functions are no longer supported". This implies that I should be able to do what I want with the key method - but how?

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Passing reverse=True just changes which of the sub-keys I need to find a way to invert. Imagine (for some strange reason) I wanted to sort by first name ascending and last name descending, for example. Passing reverse=True just means I have to find a way to invert the first name now, instead of the last name. –  Kylotan Jun 26 '12 at 12:14
    
    
It's not clear how that link helps. –  Kylotan Jun 26 '12 at 14:20
    
possible duplicate of Python: List Sorting with Multiple Attributes and Mixed Order –  Jesse May 10 '13 at 18:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The slow-but-elegant way to do this is to create a value wrapper that has reversed ordering:

from functools import total_ordering
@total_ordering
class ReversedOrder:
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value
    def __eq__(self, other):
        return other.value == self.value
    def __lt__(self, other):
        return other.value < self.value

If you don't have functools.total_ordering, you'd have to implement all 6 comparisons, e.g.:

import operator
class ReversedOrder:
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value
for x in ['__lt__', '__le__', '__eq__', '__ne__', '__ge__', '__gt__']:
    op = getattr(operator, x)
    setattr(ReversedOrder, x, lambda self, other, op=op: op(other.value, self.value))
share|improve this answer
    
If the only use for ReversedOrder is for use in a sort key then you only need to implement __lt__ and can safely ignore all of the others. –  Duncan Jun 26 '12 at 12:50
    
@Duncan where is that documented? I can't find it in the reference. –  ecatmur Jun 26 '12 at 12:55
    
See the Python 3 release notes docs.python.org/release/3.0.1/whatsnew/… . I don't know where if anywhere it is in the main docs though. –  Duncan Jun 26 '12 at 12:57
    
Going to accept this answer, because the other posts certainly solve the problem, but this one most closely answers the question. –  Kylotan Jun 27 '12 at 11:28

The most generic way to do this is simply to sort separately by each key in turn. Python's sorting is always stable so it is safe to do this:

sort(data, key=tiebreakerkey)
sort(data, key=datekey, reverse=True)

will (assuming the relevant definitions for the key functions) give you the data sorted by descending date and ascending tiebreakers.

Note that doing it this way is slower than producing a single composite key function because you will end up doing two complete sorts, so if you can produce a composite key that will be better, but splitting it out into separate sorts gives a lot of flexibility: given a key function for each column you can make any combination of them and specify reverse for any individual column.

For a completely generic option:

keys = [ (datekey, True), (tiebreakerkey, False) ]
for key, rev in reversed(keys):
    sort(data, key=key, reverse=rev)

and for completeness, though I really think it should be avoided where possible:

from functools import cmp_to_key
sort(data, key=cmp_to_key(your_old_comparison_function))

The reason I think you should avoid this you go back to having n log n calls to the comparison function compared with n calls to the key function (or 2n calls when you do the sorts twice).

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+1 for the same reason as katrielalex: it does address the problem, although I don't think it counts as 'a' key function, and I think it is less elegant than a comparison function. –  Kylotan Jun 26 '12 at 12:28
    
Even though it is slower than a composite key function it will probably still be a lot faster than a comparison function. It is also possible to write a cmp_to_key wrapper that will wrap any comparison function up to be used as a key function instead, but that's really messy –  Duncan Jun 26 '12 at 12:30
    
There's a cmp_to_key in the functools module so you could argue that's cleaner than having to generalise to multiple sorting passes. But mostly I'm just surprised that the cmp option has been removed when it's clearly the cleaner way to perform some sorts. –  Kylotan Jun 26 '12 at 12:36
    
cmp is much slower than using key especially when you have custom comparison. With a key function the custom Python code is called n times and then (usually) much faster builtin code used to compare a simple object or tuple of objects for n log n comparisons. With cmp you get the full n log n calls to the Python code. –  Duncan Jun 26 '12 at 12:39
1  
I appreciate the speed differences, but it's rare for Python to implement optimisations that make the code significantly uglier. Why not just leave in the 2 code paths and document that key is faster? –  Kylotan Jun 26 '12 at 12:47

I think the docs are incomplete. I interpret the word "primarily" to mean that there are still reasons to use cmp_to_key, and this is one of them. cmp was removed because it was an "attractive nuisance:" people would gravitate to it, even though key was a better choice.

But your case is clearly better as a cmp function, so use cmp_to_key to implement it.

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+1 I agree with this answer, nothing wrong with using the solution already provided by functools in those (rarer) cases where using a cmp function is the more elegant way. –  wim Jun 26 '12 at 13:34

Sort twice, once on each key and once reversed.

(Python sort is stable; that is, it doesn't change the order of the original list unless it has to.)

It does matter which order you do the sorts in, if you care about how equal elements get sorted.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice idea. Still, I'd consider that a bit hacky compared to a custom comparison function, and it doesn't work well in my code base (where I pick a sort key based on input and then call sort() once with it), but it is certainly a way around the problem. –  Kylotan Jun 26 '12 at 12:27

Since the Python .sort() is stable (the simplest is):

some_list.sort(key=itemgetter(0))
some_list.sort(key=itemgetter(1), reverse=True)
share|improve this answer
    
I thought the callable passed to 'key' only took one value? –  Kylotan Jun 26 '12 at 12:37
    
Yes - it does. Brain burp or what. Amended. –  Jon Clements Jun 26 '12 at 12:43

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