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Here is the code which i got confused with.It would be great help if someone corrected this code?

 int (*(x)())[2];
int main()
{
   int (*(*y)())[2]=x;

   x();
   return 0;
}

int (*(x)())[2]
{
  int **str;
  str=(int*)malloc(sizeof(int)*2);
  return str;
}

How to assign an array of pointers when returned by x?is using malloc only solution?

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
1  
What's wrong with int **arr = x();? –  Hunter McMillen Jun 26 '12 at 12:26
    
What exactly are you trying to accomplish? In main y is an array of 2 pointers to pointers to functions returning an int and taking arbitrary parameters. And you assign it a (undefined) variable x. WTH?! –  datenwolf Jun 26 '12 at 12:26
1  
The real solution is probably to not return an array of pointers in the first place. Instead take a pointer to the contents of the array as a parameter and fill that in your function. –  sth Jun 26 '12 at 12:28
3  
"Here is the code which i got confused with" On, no wonder! This code is written to confuse people :) –  dasblinkenlight Jun 26 '12 at 12:29
    
I think this looks more like homework on programming language. –  nhahtdh Jun 26 '12 at 12:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not entirely clear what you're trying to accomplish, so I'll cover more than one possibility.

First of all, a refresher on how to read and write complicated declarations in C:

Remember that () and [] have higher precedence than unary *, so *a[] is an array of pointers, while (*a)[] is a pointer to an array; similarly, *f() is a function returning a pointer, while (*f)() is a pointer to a function.

When you're trying to read a hairy declaration, start with the leftmost identifier and work your way out, remembering the rule above. Thus,

 int (*(x)())[2];

reads as

        x            -- x
       (x)           -- x
       (x)()         -- is a function
      *(x)()         -- returning a pointer
     (*(x)())[2]     -- to a 2-element array
 int (*(x)())[2]     -- of int

In this case, the parens immediately surrounding x are redundant, and can be removed: int (*x())[2];.

Here's how such a function could be written and used:

int (*x())[2]
{
  int (*arr)[2] = malloc(sizeof *arr);  // alternately, you could simply write
  return arr;                           // return malloc(sizeof (int [2]));
}                                       // type of *arr == int [2]

int main(void)
{
  int (*p)[2] = NULL;                   // alternately, you could write
  ...                                   // int (*p)[2] = x();
  p = x();
  ...
  free(p);
}

Notice that the declarations of arr, p, and x() all look the same -- they all fit the pattern int (*_)[2];. THIS IS IMPORTANT. If you declare one thing as T (*p)[N] and another thing as T **q, then their types are different and may not be compatible. A pointer to an array of T is a different type than a pointer to a pointer to T.

If your goal is to create an array of pointers to functions returning int, then your types would look like int (*f[2])();, which reads as

      f          -- f
      f[2]       -- is a 2-element array
     *f[2]       -- of pointers
    (*f[2])()    -- to functions
int (*f[2])();   -- returning int

That would look something like the following:

int foo() {...}
int bar() {...}

int main(void)
{
  int (*f[2])() = {foo, bar};
  ...
}

If you want a function that returns f, that's a little trickier. C functions cannot return array types; they can only return pointers to arrays, so your function declaration would be built up as

        g            -- g
        g()          -- is a function
       *g()          -- returning a pointer
      (*g())[2]      -- to a 2-element array
     *(*g())[2]      -- of pointers
    (*(*g())[2])()   -- to functions
int (*(*g())[2])()   -- returning int

And such a beastie would be used something like this:

int foo() {...}
int bar() {...}

int (*(*g())[2])()
{
  int (*(*f)[2])() = malloc(sizeof *f);
  (*f)[0] = foo;     // the type of the *expressions* foo and bar
  (*f)[1] = bar;     // is `int (*)()`, or pointer to function
  return f;          // returning int
}

int main(void)
{
  int (*(*p)[2])();
  int x, y;
  ...
  p = g();
  x = (*(*p)[0])();
  y = (*(*p)[1])();
  ...
  free(p);
  ...
}

Note that you can also build up hairy declarations from the outside in, using a substitution method. So,

int x();                   -- x is a function returning int
int (*p)();                -- replace x with (*p) to get a pointer to a function
                                 returning int
int (*a[2])();             -- replace p with a[2] to get an array of pointers 
                                 to functions returning int
int (*(*q)[2])();          -- replace a with (*q) to get a pointer to an array
                                 of pointers to functions returning int
int (*(*g())[2])();        -- replace q with g() to get a function returning
                                 a pointer to an array of pointers to functions
                                 returning int.

Same result, different path. I prefer the first method, but either one should work.

Many people recommend using typedef to make things easier to read:

typedef int ifunc();        // ifunc is a synonym for "function returning int"
typedef ifunc *pifunc;      // pifunc is a synonym for "pointer to function
                            //   returning int
typedef pifunc farr[2];     // farr is a synonym for "2-element array of
                            //   pointer to function returning int
typedef farr *pfarr;        // pfarr is a synonym for "pointer to 2-element
                            //   array of pointer to function returning int

pfarr g() 
{
  pfarr f = malloc(sizeof *f);
  (*f)[0] = foo;
  (*f)[1] = bar;
  return f;
}

int main(void)
{
  pfarr p = g();
  int x, y;
  x = (*(*p)[0])();
  y = (*(*p)[1])();
  ...
}

Yes, the declarations are easier to read, but there's no connection between the declaration of pand the expression (*(*p)[1])(). You'd have to grovel back through all the typedefs to understand why that expression is written the way it is, building up a mental map for each typedef.

Yes, declarations like int (*(*g())[2])() are designed to make your eyes glaze over, hiding all that behind a typedef makes the situation worse IMO.

share|improve this answer
    
Why such explicit explanation didn't get enough up-vote? –  yuan Jan 3 '13 at 6:08

Don't understand what you want to do, maybe this can help

#include<stdio.h>      // printf
#include<stdlib.h>     // malloc free

int *x();              // forward declaration because used before definition

int main() {
    int *y=x();        // y is a pointer on int 
    printf ("%d %d\n", y[0], y[1]);
    free(y);           // must call free because dynamic allocation
    return 0;
}

int *x() {
    int *res;
    res=(int*)malloc(sizeof(int)*2);   // dynamic allocation of an array of two int
    // should check res != NULL
    res[0]=10;
    res[1]=20;
    return res;
}
share|improve this answer

This following code will give you an array of pointers to functions, and standard procedures for assigning, passing of arrays applies.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef int (*XFunc())();

XFunc *x[2]; /* array of XFunc pointers */

int f1()
{
    printf("1\n");
    return 1;
}

int f2()
{
    printf("2\n");
    return 2;
}

int main()
{
    x[0] = (XFunc*)f1;
    x[1] = (XFunc*)f2;

    x[0]();
    x[1]();    

    return 0;
}

The pointer x above will point to the first element in the (fixed) array, this pointer-value is the value that will be assigned to another variable.

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