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I don't understand something in C++, gcc doesn't like how do I proceed.
I did :

    if (!fModeMdi)
            MyFirstClass* main = (MyFirstClass*) fMaino;
    else
            MySecondClass* main = (MySecondClass*) fMdio;
    ...
    ...
    int i = main->GetNum();

and I get this error :

file.C:211:16: warning: unused variable 'main' [-Wunused-variable]
file.C:213:15: warning: unused variable 'main' [-Wunused-variable]
file.C:219:9: error: 'main' was not declared in this scope

I cannot declare main in my header, because his type depends on fModeMdi boolean.
How can I solve this please ?

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Is there an inheritance hierarchy for the two classes? –  hmjd Jun 26 '12 at 12:34
    
So should provided the classes definitions, as well as some context in which "main" is used. We can't be guessing how your code is implemented. –  mfontanini Jun 26 '12 at 12:40

6 Answers 6

If MyFirstClass and MySecondClass are related through inheritance, then you can do what @unkulunkulu suggested in his answer.

However, if MyFirstClass and MySecondClass are unrelated classes, then you could use template as:

if (!fModeMdi)
{
    do_work(static_cast<MyFirstClass*>(fMaino));
}
else
{
    do_work(static_cast<MySecondClass*>(fMaino));
}

where do_work is a function template, implemented as:

template<typename T>
void do_work(T *obj)
{
    int i = obj->GetNum();

    //do rest of the work here....
}

Note that this template solution would work even if they're related!!

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How about defining the variable before the if statement, and assigning it inside of it?

MyFirstClass* main = 0; // use nullptr if you have access to a C++11 compiler

if (!fModeMdi)
    main = (MyFirstClass*) fMaino;
else
    main = (MySecondClass*) fMdio;

Since you defined it inside the if statement, after it, the variable already went out of scope and can no longer be referenced.

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2  
What if MySecondClass is NOT derived from MyFirstClass (directly or indirectly)? –  Nawaz Jun 26 '12 at 12:35
    
As long as we can assume it's OK to cast a MySecondClass * to a MyFirstClass *. –  JoeFish Jun 26 '12 at 12:35
    
Yes, you're right. I assumed that, since OP is using 2 variables named the same way, those types were compatible. If he provided those classes definitions, maybe another approach could be used. –  mfontanini Jun 26 '12 at 12:37
    
@mfontanini: See my solution. –  Nawaz Jun 26 '12 at 12:42
    
@mfontanini: Note that c-style cast may not work here. What you need here is dynamic_cast if objects involved are polymorphic classes. –  Nawaz Jun 26 '12 at 12:58

Assign the value of i with in the loop.

int i;
if (!fModeMdi){
        MyFirstClass* main = (MyFirstClass*) fMaino;
        i = main->GetNum();
}else{
        MySecondClass* main = (MySecondClass*) fMdio;
        i = main->GetNum();
}
share|improve this answer

The following should work. In c++ the scope of a variable is inside the bracket { }, that is it is only recognized inside the bracket. Once you get out, the program has no idea about it.

MyFirstClass* main =0; 
MySecondClass* main2 =0; 

if (!fModeMdi)
            main = (MyFirstClass*) fMaino;
    else
            main2 = (MySecondClass*) fMdio;
share|improve this answer
    
There is now at least one uninitialised pointer. –  hmjd Jun 26 '12 at 12:35
    
sorry, fixed the the uninitialized –  Nick Jun 26 '12 at 12:37

C++ is a statically-typed language, at this line

    int i = main->GetNum();

the compiler has to know the type of main at compile time (statically, hence the name). You cannot make type of main depend on some value fModeMdi, which is known only at runtime. If each of your classes contain a method GetNum and others, which you use after the if statement, you can consider moving them to a base class like this:

class MyBaseClass {
public:
    virtual int GetNum() = 0;
}

class MyFirstClass : public MyBaseClass {
    // ...
};


class MySecondClass : public MyBaseClass {
    // ...
};

MyBaseClass* main = 0;
if (!fModeMdi)
            main = (MyFirstClass*) fMaino;
    else
            main = (MySecondClass*) fMdio;
    ...
    ...

And then this is legal

    int i = main->GetNum();

Actually, proper design (moving the common methods to a base class) will probably eliminate the need for this if statement altogether. This is what called the polymorphism, its whole purpose is to eliminate the need for these if or switch statements.

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Crikey this is almost word-for-word what I was going to post. You're quick! –  JoeFish Jun 26 '12 at 12:37

If main may not be polymorphic, then what appears to be the right solution is a functor (or function object). boost function and boost bind provide these libraries.

Ignoring the memory leak in the below program, we bind the object new A() or new B() to their respective GetNum() calls and wrap them in a callable object, f. We call f() when needed.

#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <iostream>

class A {
     public:
    int GetNum() { return 0; }
};

class B {
    public:
    int GetNum() { return 0; }
};

int main(int args, char** argv)
{

    bool p = true;
    boost::function<int()> f;
    int i;

    if ( p ) {
        f = boost::bind(&A::GetNum, new A());
    }
    else {
        f = boost::bind(&B::GetNum, new B());
    }

    i = f();

    std::cout<<i<<std::endl;

    return 0;
}
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