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Hi I am reading a log file(Text File) using C# in my application and I am reading the log file using dates . And also I created a Regex format for get the exception by date basis.

Now I am getting the exception by using this regex format successfully but I am not able to get the Exception line properly. The last letter of the exception line is missing for me when i am going to use the below regex format. Tell me What I did wrong in this line. Can anyone please tell me the solution to get the full line of the exception.

Thanks in advance.

My Code is:

 var matches = Regex.Matches(sb.ToString(), @"(?<date>\d{4}\-\d{2}\-\d{2})\s(?<message>(.(?!\d{4}\-\d{2}\-\d{2}))+)");

My txt file looks like

2012-06-21 04:35:30,177|| [5]|| DEBUG|| GID.AAFramework.Shared.LdapAuthentication.PrincipleImpl||  PrincipleImpl: IsInRole(string role)-  Entered
2012-06-21 04:35:30,177|| [5]|| DEBUG|| GID.AAFramework.Shared.LdapAuthentication.PrincipleImpl||  PrincipleImpl: IsInRole(string role)-  IsInRole(ADMINUSER) 
results : True

in my log file all the lines starts with date but in some lines messages are too long so it comes to next line..so i want to read the file starts with date means i misses the line starts with that message...

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4  
Is your textfile valid xml? If so, you should use XmlDocument or XDocument to get this data and not regular expressions. In any case, posting a sample of your textfile would be really great to better understand the problem. –  Karl-Johan Sjögren Jun 26 '12 at 13:30
    
can you show a sample of log entry –  Shoaib Shaikh Jun 26 '12 at 13:31
    
@Karl: the <date> type stuff is just naming capture groups, not literal text to search for. But I totally agree that we need to see sample input and output to understand what is going wrong. –  Chris Jun 26 '12 at 13:34
    
Oh yeah, right @Chris. Didn't look carefully enough there. But a sample of the actual logfile would still be very helpful. –  Karl-Johan Sjögren Jun 26 '12 at 13:39
    
here i have upfated my txt file –  SuryaKavitha Jun 26 '12 at 13:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try to use:

 @"(?<date>\d{4}\-\d{2}\-\d{2})\s+(?<message>(.(?!\d{4}\-\d{2}\-\d{2}))+.)"
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@Omega:Thanks. Your Code is working fine yar. I got it. Thank you so much. Can you please give me a bit more explanation about above regex format ? I am new to this regex so I want to know about it. –  SuryaKavitha Jun 27 '12 at 6:06
    
@SuryaKavitha - (1) I changed \s to s+ - this is maybe not needed, but what it does it says that space between date and message may be 1 or more whitespace characters; (2) at the end I added . which represents any one single character. Because you used negative lookahead (?! ... ), your regex cut last character, as you matched those characters that are not followd by date, but the last character of message was followed by date, so you didn't included it in match. Maybe even better would be to not have there just ., but .?, in case thre is nothing behind message. –  Ωmega Jun 27 '12 at 11:05

To answer your first question, to get the last missing letter, just change the position of the dot in your pattern:

var matches = Regex.Matches(sb.ToString(), @"(?<date>\d{4}\-\d{2}\-\d{2})\s(?<message>((?!\d{4}\-\d{2}\-\d{2}).)+)");

This is now matching the next letter if it is not the start of the lookahead pattern. Your pattern matched the next character if the lookahead pattern is not following that character.

I am not sure what your question is in the last part you added about the next line ...

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:Thanks for your nice code. Can you please give me a bit more explanation about above regex format ? I am new to this regex so I want to know about it. –  SuryaKavitha Jun 27 '12 at 6:07

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