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I am just wondering what the result would be if I subclassed a class which extends Thread and I wrote following code and tested:

class A extends Thread {
    public A() {
        this.start();
    }
    public void run() {
        System.out.println(" in A " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
    }
}

class B extends A {
    public void run() {
        System.out.println(" in B " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
    }
}

public class OverrideRun {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a = new A();
        B b = new B();
    }    
}

And the result is:

in A Thread-0
in B Thread-1

But I don't understand why two threads are created?

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5 Answers 5

but i don't understand why two threads are created ?

Two threads are started because you are starting them in the A() constructor:

public A() {
    this.start();
}

and you are constructing two objects -- an A and a B which extends A:

    A a = new A();
    B b = new B();

By default, when you say new B() since it does not have a no-arg constructor, it will call the no-arg constructor of the superclass. So it will call the A constructor which starts the thread. See Java documentation here. To quote:

You don't have to provide any constructors for your class, but you must be careful when doing this. The compiler automatically provides a no-argument, default constructor for any class without constructors. This default constructor will call the no-argument constructor of the superclass. In this situation, the compiler will complain if the superclass doesn't have a no-argument constructor so you must verify that it does. If your class has no explicit superclass, then it has an implicit superclass of Object, which does have a no-argument constructor.

As an aside, it is not good practice to start a thread inside of it's constructor. There are some thread race conditions that can happen when you do this. It is much better to call a.start() after you call new A(). Also, it is a better pattern to define a class that implements Runnable instead of extending Thread. So your code should be:

class A implements Runnable() {
     public A() {
         // don't start it here
     }
     public void run() {
         ...
     }
}
...

Thread a = new Thread(new A());
a.start();
Thread b = new Thread(new B());
b.start();
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That's because you created two threads (two objects inherited from Thread), here:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    A a = new A(); // #1
    B b = new B(); // #2
}
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This is because the B b = new B(); statement calls no argument parameter of class B and that calls no argument parameter constructor(Default) of class A.

This is due to constructor chaining.

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2 threads are getting created because you are asking for it by running the following lines:

    A a = new A();
    B b = new B();
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A extends Thread, B extends A, so when you create an instance of A and an instance of B, you've created two instances of Thread.

Note that it's generally preferred not to extend Thread, but instead to just implement Runnable - then pass that Runnable to the Thread(Runnable) constructor. This ends up being cleaner from a design point of view - you're not really trying to change the threading behaviour, you're just giving it a different task to execute.

(It's also generally better to use the facilities in java.util.concurrent instead of creating threads directly in the first place, but there we go...)

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