Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a general question:

my program will just go on processing something which does not require user input or system resources (like printer etc..) meaning, my program will not wait for any resources except CPU time.

The same program (let us say job) may be initiated by multiple users.

in this case, is it worth full to run this in a thread (meaning each user will get a feeling that his job is executed without delay. or is it better to run the jobs sequentially?

The issue with running as separate threads is that, too many threads running simultaneously forcing the CPU utilization go over 100%.

Please suggest. Assume that user donot see his job progress. User is not worried when his job is finished. But at the same time, I want to have the CPU busy running the jobs.

share|improve this question
    
Higher CPU utilization = good use of your available resources. Why do you seem to think it's bad? –  assylias Jun 26 '12 at 13:37
    
It allows you better make use of multiple CPUs, instead of just one. –  Alex Lockwood Jun 26 '12 at 13:42
    
How are users "initiating" the job? If they are running in different JVMs, it doesn't matter if it's threaded as each JVM will be on its own process. –  aglassman Jun 26 '12 at 18:15

4 Answers 4

If you don't care how long a process takes, or the length of time it takes is acceptable, then using one thread is likely to be the simplest solution. For example, many GUI applications only use one event handling thread.

If you want to keep all your CPUs busy you can start a number of busy loops to max out all the CPUs.

What you usually want is to reduce latency, or improve threadput by using more CPUs. Unless this is a goal, using more CPUs won't help you.

share|improve this answer

If the thread is genuinely purely CPU-bound, then it doesn't make sense to create more threads than there are cores (or virtual cores) available to process them. So on a quad-core machine, create no more than four threads (and probably only three, as your process isn't the only thing going on on the machine). On a quad-core machine with hyper-threading (two virtual threads per core), you might create six or seven. Creating too many additional threads (say, hundreds) causes unnecessary context-switching, which can be expensive if you really overdo it.

The converse is that on a multi-core machine, a single thread can only run on one core. So on a quad-core machine, running the jobs sequentially on a single thread will only utilize 25% of the CPU capacity.

So: Run the jobs in parallel up to the number of available cores, and sequentially (on each core) beyond that.

Big caveat: Your mileage may vary. There are lots of inputs to this equation, including what else is going on on the machine, and particularly whether the jobs really are CPU-bound (as opposed to system-bound, e.g., CPU and I/O subsystem and such).

share|improve this answer

I guess your program needs memory access. Memory access may be slow, and you really want to run the processor at that time. A common solution to limit the number of threads running at the same time is to use a thread pool.

share|improve this answer

in this case, is it worth full to run this in a thread (meaning each user will get a feeling that his job is executed without delay. or is it better to run the jobs sequentially?

It depends highly on the job. If it is interactive then running it immediately would give a better interface to the user. If the speed of the response is not an issue then maybe you don't want to incur the complexity costs of writing a multi-threaded program.

The issue with running as separate threads is that, too many threads running simultaneously forcing the CPU utilization go over 100%.

I wouldn't worry about this. One of the reasons why we use multiple threads is that we can make use of multiple processors to actually get the job done faster. In this case, depending on the OS, you can actually see more than 100% load for the process if you are using more than a full CPU -- this is expected. Also, if the CPU goes over 100%, the operating system will handle it fine unless you are worried that your application will be taking cycles away from a more important application.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.