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If a class inherits from an interface that itself implements IDisposable should that class also implement IDisposable or not?

e.g.

internal IMyInterface : IDisposable
{
  Method1();
}

internal ClassA : IMyInterface, IDisposable
{
  public Method1
  {
    ...
  }

  public Dispose()
  {
    ...
  }

}

or

internal ClassA : IMyInterface
{
  public Method1
  {
    ...
  }

  public Dispose()
  {
    ...
  }

}

Any clarification on this matter would be most appreciated. Thanks

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Does your derived class actually have anything that requires explicit disposal? If not, don't bother. The base takes care of its own disposal requirements. –  TrueBlueAussie Jun 26 '12 at 13:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Interfaces are contracts and have no implementation of anything. Therefore a class implementing an interface MUST implement everything what the directly or indirectly inherited interfaces dictate. Your code won't even compile if you don't.

YES you must implement IDisposable unless you derive your class from a class that already implements it. (Note: You do not need to specify the IDisposable interface in the inheritance list of your class, but you must implement its members.)


UPDATE

Note: Visual Studio makes it easy for you to implement an interface. A smart tag will automatically appear below IMyInterface as long as you have not implemented it completely. You can choose between explicit and implicit implementation of the interface in the smart tag menu. Usually you would choose implicit. Then VS will automatically create the (empty) methods, properties and other members required by the interface, including Dispose.

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The class will have to implement the Dispose method anyway.

if you are asking if you have to declare that your class implements IDisposable as well? so the answer is no, you don't have to

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An interface is a declaration. When an interface inherits another interface - it actually adds some more method declarations to the declarations of the inherited interface.

So in your case - IMyInterface will declare both "Method1()" and "Dispose()" methods. No need to add IDisposable again.

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NO , it is not necessary to implement the Dispose seperately since the Interface won't let it compile Until Dispose() is there.

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Since IMyInterface is IDisposable, then ClassA does not need to inherit directly from IDisposable ...otherwise, yes, ClassA must implement IDisposable in this example.

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I think you mean implement, rather than inherit with respect to Interfaces. –  TrueBlueAussie Jun 26 '12 at 13:43
    
@Olivier explained it a lot better than I. But I think I used the correct terminology. ;) –  IAbstract Jun 26 '12 at 16:45
    
Inheritance implements "is a" relationships via inherited code. Interfaces are implemented (i.e. nothing is inherited). Inheritance has a very specific meaning. –  TrueBlueAussie Jun 27 '12 at 7:59

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