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The following seems to be a very common pattern for creating small subviews in Backbone.js: this.$el.append(new ListItem({...}).render().el).

I can only think of problems that external calls of render cause, such as the view's data not yet been fetched. This is why I let the view take care of its own rendering. Am I missing something here?

Edit: Examples in pseudocode (irrelevant code omitted etc.) to clarify things:

Why the following in which render is called explicitly:

var FruitView = Backbone.View.extend({
  render: function() {
    this.$el.html(...);
  }
});

var FruitListView = Backbone.View.extend({
  render: function() {
    this.collection.each(function(fruit) {
      this.$el.append(new FruitView({...}).render().el);
    });
  }
});

Instead of this where FruitView takes care of its own rendering:

var FruitView = Backbone.View.extend({
  initialize: function() {
    this.render();
  },

  render: function() {
    this.$el.html(...);
  }
});

var FruitListView = Backbone.View.extend({
  render: function() {
    this.collection.each(function(fruit) {
      this.$el.append(new FruitView({...}).el);
    });
  }
});
share|improve this question
    
Are you bootstrapping your collections on page load? If so, your application will always have data, even for the very first view.render() call –  jackwanders Jun 26 '12 at 14:08
    
... and what he said as well as my answer. if you have bootstrapped, my point is somewhat moot –  joevallender Jun 26 '12 at 14:11
    
@jackwanders Bootstrapping is not always an option and I am not really asking here about data retrieval. –  ponzao Jun 26 '12 at 14:34

1 Answer 1

The parent view is likely to be bound to a collection, and each 'row' to a model.

So instantiating and rendering a view won't really matter so long as you have a re-render binding for collection 'reset' and 'add' (or a separate function for appending a new rendered row on 'add') and a re-render binding on the row for 'change' for instance.

In the most common case, I'd guess that if the collection was empty, the loop that your line of code is in wouldn't even run. Then the collection would 'reset' and the view will render for the first time, with data.

However, as always, I may have missed the point ;-) I'll watch this thread this afternoon for any notes you have

EDIT

I see what you mean. I can't really see why. I think I just usually write the other way as that was the pattern I saw a lot of when first got into it.

As you say - All data/load/binding issues don't come into it.

I guess the only reason to not render() on init() would be if you sometimes want to init without rendering?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, I think you misunderstood me. My question isn't related to how collections are rendered. What I am asking is, if there is a good reason for a view to call another view's render method. –  ponzao Jun 26 '12 at 14:19
    
Would you normally not nest the views? I guess the render of the subview comes in when you are using append() - is it the pattern itself you are querying? –  joevallender Jun 26 '12 at 14:34
    
I edited my question, hopefully the example clarifies a bit. –  ponzao Jun 26 '12 at 14:45
    
edited 'answer' ... –  joevallender Jun 26 '12 at 15:18
    
Good that I finally made sense :) I've also used this pattern due to its popularity, but don't really see a reason behind it, hence my question. –  ponzao Jun 26 '12 at 21:19

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