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This is a general question, not related to a particular operation. I would like to be able to write the results of an arbitrary function into elements of a cell array without regard for the data type the function returns. Consider this pseudocode:

zout = cell(n,m);
myfunc = str2func('inputname'); %assume myfunc puts out m values to match zout dimensions
zout(1,:) = myfunc(x,y);

That will work for "inputname" == "strcat" , for example, given that x and y are strings or cells of strings with appropriate dimension. But if "inputname" == "strcmp" then the output is a logical array, and Matlab throws an error. I'd need to do

zout(1,:) = num2cell(strcmp(x,y));

So my question is: is there a way to fill the cell array zout without having to test for the type of variable generated by myfunc(x,y ? Should I be using a struct in the first place (and if so, what's the best way to populate it)?
(I'm usually an R user, where I could just use a list variable without any pain)

Edit: To simplify the overall scope, add the following "requirement" : Let's assume for now that, for a function which returns multiple outputs, only the first one need be captured in zout . But when this output is a vector of N values or a vector of cells (i.e. Nx1 cell array), these N values get mapped to zout(1,1:N) .

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what about the number of output arguments, do all the functions you want to work with return 1 variable? do they use varargout? –  Amro Jun 29 '12 at 12:15
    
@Amro I'd like to make it as general as possible, so that whatever the function returns (number, several numbers, character string, logical value) is placed in the designated cell. Example: x = 1:4, y = 6, myfunc = atan2, so zout(1,1:4) (four cells) is filled with the four values returned from atan2 . –  Carl Witthoft Jun 29 '12 at 13:41
    
@CarlWitthot: I'm specifically talking about the number of variable returned not their type. The reason I ask is some functions will only return as much output arguments as you request. Take unique for example, it returns up to 3 variables, and there is no way to programmatically know the number of outputs from the function (it is defined as function varargout = unique(varargin)). If you call nargout('unique') it says -1 (minus to indicate varargout, so only one argument is reported) –  Amro Jun 29 '12 at 13:49
    
@CarlWitthot: just to point it out, your example of ATAN2 returns ONE output argument not four, though its a vector of length 4. So is this the behavior you're looking for, every number in a cell on its own? –  Amro Jun 29 '12 at 13:53
    
@Amro Yes, if the output is a vector, each element of the vector goes into its own cell. If the output is a Mx1 cell array, each cell becomes the matching cell in zout (not a cell inside a cell). I'm looking for DWIM behavior. The reason zout is a cell array is so that I can place each separate value into its own "location" regardless of the value's type (numeric, logical, character). –  Carl Witthoft Jun 29 '12 at 15:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

So my question is: is there a way to fill the cell array zout without having to test for the type of variable generated by myfunc(x,y) ? Should I be using a struct in the first place (and if so, what's the best way to populate it)?

The answer provided by @NotBoStyf is almost there, but not quite. Cell arrays are the right way to go. However, the answer very much depends on the number of outputs from the function.

Functions with only one output

The function strcmp has only one output, which is an array. The reason that

zout{1,:} = strcmp(x,y)

gives you an error message, when zout is dimensioned N x 2, is that the left-hand side (zout{1,:}) expects two outputs from the right-hand side. You can fix this with:

[zout{1,:}] = num2cell(strcmp(x,y));  % notice the square brackets on the LHS

However, there's really no reason to do this. You can simply define zout as an N x 1 cell array and capture the results:

zout = cell(1,1);

x = 'a';
y = { 'a', 'b' };

zout{1} = strcmp(x,y);

% Referring to the results:
x_is_y_1 = zout{1}(1);
x_is_y_2 = zout{1}(2);

There's one more case to consider...

Functions with multiple outputs

If your function produces multiple outputs (as opposed to a single output that is an array), then this will only capture the first output. Functions that produce multiple outputs are defined like this:

function [outA,outB] = do_something( a, b )
  outA = a + 1;
  outB = b + 2;
end

Here, you need to explicitly capture both output arguments. Otherwise, you just get a. For example:

outA = do_something( [1,2,3], [4,5,6] ); % outA is [2,3,4]

[outA,outB] = do_something( [1,2,3], [4,5,6] ); % outA is [2,3,4], outB is [6,7,8]

Z1 = cell(1,1);
Z1{1,1} = do_something( [1,2,3], [4,5,6] ); % Z1{1,1} is [2,3,4]

Z2 = cell(1,2);
Z2{1,1:2} = do_something( [1,2,3], [4,5,6] ); % Same error as above.  
% NB: You really never want to have a cell expansion that is not surrounded 
% by square brackets.

% Do this instead:
[Z2{1,1:2}] = do_something( [1,2,3], [4,5,6] ); % Z2{1,1} is [2,3,4], Z2{1,2} is [6,7,8]

This can also be done programmatically, with some limits. Let's say we're given function func that takes one input and returns a constant (but unknown) number of outputs. We have cell array inp that contains the inputs we want to process, and we want to collect the results in cell around outp:

N = numel(inp);
M = nargout(@func);  % number of outputs produced by func 
outp = cell(N,M);
for i=1:N
  [ outp{i,:} ] = func( inp{i} );
end

This approach has a few caveats:

  1. It captures all of the outputs. This is not always what you want.

  2. Capturing all of the outputs can often change the behavior of the function. For example, the find function returns linear indices if only one output is used, row/column indices if two outputs are used, and row/column/value if three outputs are used.

  3. It won't work for functions that have a variable number of outputs. These functions are defined as function [a,b,...,varargout] = func( ... ). nargout will return a negative number if the function has varargout declared in its output list, because there's no way for Matlab to know how many outputs will be produced.

Unpacking array and cell outputs into a cell

All true so far, but: what I am hoping for is a generic solution. I can't use num2cell if the function produces cell outputs. So what worked for strcmp will fail for strcat and vice versa. Let's assume for now that, for a function which returns multiple outputs, only the first one need be captured in zout – Carl Witthoft

To provide a uniform output syntax for all functions that return either a cell or an array, use an adapter function. Here is an example that handles numeric arrays and cells:

function [cellOut] = cellify(input)
  if iscell(input)
    cellOut = input;
  elseif isnumeric(input)
    cellOut = num2cell(input);
  else
    error('cellify currently does not support structs or objects');
  end
end

To unpack the output into a 2-D cell array, the size of each output must be constant. Assuming M outputs:

N = numel(inp);
% M is known and constant
outp = cell(N,M);
for i=1:N
  outp(i,:) = cellify( func( inp{i} ) );  % NB: parentheses instead of curlies on LHS
end

The output can then be addressed as outp{i,j}. An alternate approach allows the size of the output to vary:

N = numel(inp);
% M is not necessary here
outp = cell(N,1);
for i=1:N
  outp{i} = cellify( func( inp{i} ) );  % NB: back to curlies on LHS
end

The output can then be addressed as outp{i}{j}, and the size of the output can vary.

A few things to keep in mind:

  1. Matlab cells are basically inefficient pointers. The JIT compiler does not always optimize them as well as numeric arrays.

  2. Splitting numeric arrays into cells can cost quite a bit of memory. Each split value is actually a numeric array, which has size and type information associated with it. In numeric array form, this occurs once for each array. When the array is split, this incurs once for each element.

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That's some great information there! –  Ben A. Jun 29 '12 at 15:28
    
All true so far, but: what I am hoping for is a generic solution. I can't use num2cell if the function produces cell outputs. So what worked for strcmp will fail for strcat and vice versa. Let's assume for now that, for a function which returns multiple outputs, only the first one need be captured in zout –  Carl Witthoft Jun 29 '12 at 15:28
    
+1 well explained -- I was in the process of writing something similar, but you beat me to it :) –  Amro Jun 29 '12 at 15:32
    
@CarlWitthoft if only the first one needs to be captured, then treat it like a single-output function. I would use an Nx1 cell array and directly capture the output in the cell array: zout{i} = func(...). You only need to use NxM cell arrays to capture multiple outputs. There's really no gain in using num2cell, as opposed to indexing the output of the function with zout{i}(j). If the function outputs a cell, then num2cell won't work (cells aren't numbers), and you're better off with zout{i}{j}. The same is true if the function outputs a struct: zout{i}.field –  sfstewman Jun 29 '12 at 15:39
    
@CarlWitthoft don't get hung up on num2cell. You don't need it. x{1} = func(y) will assign the results of the function into a cell whether it is a number, a string, a cell, a cell array, whatever. A cell can hold anything. You only need to use something like num2cell if you try and use () instead of {} indexing. –  tmpearce Jun 29 '12 at 15:43

Use curly braces instead when asigning a value. Using

 zout{1,:} = strcmp(x,y);

instead should work.

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You no longer need num2cell with curly-brace indexing. –  tmpearce Jun 26 '12 at 14:31
    
of course! I edited. –  Not Bo Styf Jun 26 '12 at 14:46
    
Also: if you want to assign to a single position in the cell array, {1,1} is needed instead of {1,:} –  tmpearce Jun 26 '12 at 15:41
    
This does not work. x = num2cell('a'); y = num2cell('ab'); strcmp(x,y) returns ` 1 0` . BUT: for a cell array zout with dimensions N,2, zout{1,:} = strcmp(x,y) gives the error message "??? The right hand side of this assignment has too few values to satisfy the left hand side." I've been trying, but I haven't seen any way to use zout{1,:} = to assign items to separate cells in zout . At best I get nested cell arrays, which is not what I want. Curly brackets even causes the strcat case to fail. –  Carl Witthoft Jun 26 '12 at 16:00
    
@CarlWitthoft this is because of the way Matlab determines the sizes based on how you are indexing and your use of the curly braces and curved braces. Simply type in size(zout{1,:}) and see what the result is. Compare that to size(strcmp(x,y)) and you will see that they are indeed different. You'll need to design your code based on what your expected return(s) are going to be in order to be able to place it into the cell array like this. –  Ben A. Jun 29 '12 at 15:17

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