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I have a UIViewController thats presented modally. When I watch the memory allocations Instrument, the memory usage increases when the view is presented, but when it's exited the memory isn't released. If I keep opening and closing the view, the memory just keeps getting higher. Instruments doesn't report a memory leak! What could be causing this? The View Controller code is below (I've skipped the didSelectRow code). Dealloc is always called.

EDIT - I am using ARC

.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
@class OutlineTextUILabel;

@interface StoreViewController : UIViewController <UITableViewDelegate, UITableViewDataSource> {

    int starCount;
    NSMutableArray *_singleUseArray;
    NSMutableArray *_fullUseArray;

}

@property (weak, nonatomic) IBOutlet UITableView *tableView;
@property (weak, nonatomic) IBOutlet OutlineTextUILabel *starCountLbl;
- (IBAction)exitBtnPressed:(id)sender;

.m

#import "StoreViewController.h"
#import "NSUserDefaults+MPSecureUserDefaults.h"
#import "PowerUpCell.h"
#import "OutlineTextUILabel.h"
#import "PowerUpSingleton.h"
#import "PowerUp.h"

#define kPrefsNumberOfStars             @"numberOfStars"

@interface StoreViewController ()

@end

@implementation StoreViewController
@synthesize tableView = _tableView;
@synthesize starCountLbl;

#pragma mark View Methods

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    // Display star count
    NSUserDefaults *prefs = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];
    BOOL valid = NO;
    starCount = [prefs secureIntegerForKey:kPrefsNumberOfStars valid:&valid];
    if (!valid) {
        NSLog(@"Stars Tampered With!");
        self.starCountLbl.text = @"Err";
    } else {
        self.starCountLbl.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",starCount];
    }

    // Tableview setup
    CGRect frame2 = CGRectMake(0, 0, 320, 40);
    UIView *footer = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:frame2];
    footer.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor];
    self.tableView.tableFooterView = footer;
    self.tableView.opaque = NO;
    self.tableView.backgroundView = nil;
}

- (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [super viewWillAppear:YES];

    if (![[PowerUpSingleton sharedList] refreshArray]) {
        NSLog(@"Error, %s",__FUNCTION__);
    } else {
        [self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(workOutSingleUseToDisplay) withObject:nil waitUntilDone:YES];
        [self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(workOutFullUseToDisplay) withObject:nil waitUntilDone:YES];
        [self.tableView reloadData];
    }
}

- (void)workOutSingleUseToDisplay
{
    _singleUseArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    for (PowerUp *pu in [[PowerUpSingleton sharedList] sharedArray]) {
        if (!pu.fullUnlock) {
            [_singleUseArray addObject:pu];
        }
    }
}

- (void)workOutFullUseToDisplay
{
    _fullUseArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    for (PowerUp *pu in [[PowerUpSingleton sharedList] sharedArray]) {
        if (pu.prefFullName != nil) {
            [_fullUseArray addObject:pu];
        }
    }

}

- (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
    [super didReceiveMemoryWarning];
    // Dispose of any resources that can be recreated.
}

- (BOOL)shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation
{
    return (interfaceOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait || interfaceOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown);
}

- (void)viewDidUnload {
    [self setTableView:nil];
    [self setStarCountLbl:nil];
    [super viewDidUnload];
}

#pragma mark TableView Setup Methods

- (NSInteger)numberOfSectionsInTableView:(UITableView *)tableView
{
    return 2;
}

- (NSString *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView titleForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section
{
    if (section == 0) {
        return @"Single Use";
    } else if (section == 1) {
        return @"Use forever";
    }

    return nil;
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section
{
    if (section == 0) {
        return [_singleUseArray count];
    } else if (section == 1) {
        return [_fullUseArray count];
    }

    return 0;
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    NSString *cellIdentifier;
    if (indexPath.section == 0) {
        cellIdentifier = @"powerUpCellSingleUse";
    } else if (indexPath.section == 1) {
        cellIdentifier = @"powerUpCell";
    }

    PowerUpCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil) {
        cell = [[PowerUpCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
    }

    if (indexPath.section == 0) {
        PowerUp *tmpPU = [_singleUseArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
        cell.descriptionLbl.text = tmpPU.displayName;
        int cost = tmpPU.costSingle;
        cell.costLbl.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",cost];
        if (cost > starCount) {
            cell.costLbl.textColor = [UIColor redColor];
        } else {
            cell.costLbl.textColor = [UIColor blueColor];
        }
        int howMany = tmpPU.numberOwned;
        cell.howManyLbl.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",howMany];

    } else if (indexPath.section == 1) {
        PowerUp *tmpPU = [_fullUseArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
        cell.descriptionLbl.text = tmpPU.displayName;
        int cost = tmpPU.costFull;
        cell.costLbl.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",cost];
        if (cost > starCount) {
            cell.costLbl.textColor = [UIColor redColor];
        } else {
            cell.costLbl.textColor = [UIColor blueColor];
        }
        if (tmpPU.fullUnlock) {
            cell.costLbl.textColor = [UIColor greenColor];
            cell.costLbl.text = @"---";
        }
    }

    return cell;
}

#pragma mark -

- (IBAction)exitBtnPressed:(id)sender
{
    [self dismissModalViewControllerAnimated:YES];
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    NSLog(@"%s",__FUNCTION__);
    self.tableView = nil;
    self.starCountLbl = nil;
}

@end

EDIT ------------- Something seems not to be right. I've added an NSLog to the cell alloc, and it's never called, even though the cells are created!

PowerUpCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil) {
        NSLog(@"new cell");
        cell = [[PowerUpCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
    }

EDIT July 1st ------ I've added a Navigation controller and now use push instead of modal and this problem is still here. I've taken heap shots with Instruments by moving back and forward between views a few times and it seems maybe the cells are still hanging around, as this screenshot shows gesture recogniser still around from a previous load of the view. screen shot

share|improve this question
    
Inside viewWillAppear you use performOnMainThread. This isn't needed, viewWillAppear happens on the main thread. – Paul de Lange Jun 26 '12 at 15:32
    
I only used this method so I can set waitUntilDone:YES so I now the arrays have been filled before drawing the table. – Darren Jun 26 '12 at 15:50
    
Try just this: [self workOutFullUseToDisplay]. You do realize Objective-C is sequential right? – Paul de Lange Jun 26 '12 at 15:55
    
I had that originally, but wasn't sure it would complete the workOutSingleUseToDisplay method before calling the next one. I'll remove it if not needed. Thx – Darren Jun 26 '12 at 15:58
    
I have fixed it :-) If I change my IBOutlet for tableView to strong instead of weak, then free's its memory when closed. Can anyone explain why this is the case? I thought a weak reference would have 1 less reference count. – Darren Jul 1 '12 at 15:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

It is because you used your IBOutlets as weak, instead of using strong.

I actually believe this is a flaw in the XCode environment, as it should warn you of this kind of behavior.

As a best practice, I would suggest letting XCode generate the IBOutlets by dragging the views to the code in the Interface Builder, to avoid such annoying pitfalls.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I said this myself above. An explanation as to why would be good. I read a while ago to use weak links for IBOutlets. I do let XCode generate the IBOutlets but in the popup you have a choice of Strong or Weak. Also, I thought strong would have more chance of leaving something behind than weak! I thought a weak referenced object would be removed when the view is removed. – Darren Jul 2 '12 at 9:23
1  
It actually depends. You should use strong links for IBOutlets that are owned by the FileOwner, and weak links for IBOutlets that are used by subviews. developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… Please take notice of the parts that relate to iOS (and not OS X) – Gilbert Jul 2 '12 at 12:05
2  
I believe, that in your specific case, the UITableView cells were allocated with a strong link, and referenced the tableview (superview). While on the other end, the UITableview (which is weak), was also referencing the cells - which didn't allow any one of them to dealloc – Gilbert Jul 2 '12 at 12:12

Looks like you've already found some ways around this, but just in case this helps:

1) Make sure you haven't got Zombies turned on while you're debugging, as this causes objects to hang around after you think they should be dealloc-ed (Edit scheme -> Run -> Diagnostics).

2) You're using ARC and so I assume storyboards or at least prototype UITableView cells in your storyboard/NIB? If so, then the reason your NSLog() below never gets called is because the dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier call knows to create cells from these prototype cells via the defined cellIdentifier. Pretty handy.

PowerUpCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil) {
        NSLog(@"new cell");
        cell = [[PowerUpCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
    }

You have to rely on the UITableView to manage this cache of UITableViewCells, and release them appropriately. So it's possible they are just hanging around because your UITableView isn't being released (though I think you're saying it is).

share|improve this answer
    
It helped me! @ChrisH thanks for posting this. Actually your first tip helped me track down some inexplicable behavior. Posts like this make Stack Overflow even better! – scrrr May 8 '14 at 11:35
    
can you share what was you problem ? i think i might have something simmilar in my app. – Piotr Aug 6 '14 at 21:47

I'm not sure if I got the anwer, but there's something strange in your code :

your are using weak properties :

@property (weak, nonatomic) IBOutlet UITableView *tableView;
@property (weak, nonatomic) IBOutlet OutlineTextUILabel *starCountLbl;

But according to the doc (search "weak"), weak propoerty is quite similar to assign.

In you dealloc, you have

self.tableView = nil;
self.starCountLbl = nil;

I'm pretty sure that the generated setter of these properties doesn't release them at all !

But if you declare your properties like :

@property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet UITableView *tableView;
@property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet OutlineTextUILabel *starCountLbl;

the generated setter would be like

(void)setTableView(UITableView *)newTableView {
    [tableView release];
    if(newTableView != nil)
        tableView = [newTableView retain];
}

And your properties would be released.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually only added the self.tableView=nil and self.starCountLbl=nil to dealloc while trying to find whats not releasing. It isn't actually needed because they are weak references anyway and release when the view controller is released. – Darren Jun 26 '12 at 14:50

[EDIT]

In your viewWillAppear method, have you printed out to see how often you move through your else clause. To me it seems that you call your workOutSingleUseToDisplay and workOutFullUseToDisplay methods. Each time you call those, you are allocating _singleUseArray and _fullUseArray. Just because you move in and out of a view, does not mean it calls the dealloc, or that it will auto-release your current arrays. What I think you are seeing is that when you move out of your view, it does not release those two arrays, but does try to reallocate them.

[ORIGINAL] Well, in your viewDidLoad, you perform an alloc. In your dealloc, I don't see a [footer release]. This may be your leak!!! Nor do I see releasing of your _singleUseArray or _fullUseArray arrays

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using ARC so can't manually release. I've tried adding _singleUseArray = nil; _fullUseArray = nil; footer = nil; to the dealloc but no change. – Darren Jun 26 '12 at 14:48
1  
You should have tell about ARC in your initial post, cause I think it's determinating for the answer. – Martin Jun 26 '12 at 15:07
    
Sorry about that. I'll add it to the question. I have moved the 2 array alloc's to the viewDidLoad so they will definitely only be called once, but the memory patterns are still the same. The view controllers dealloc is being called on every close. Any other ideas? – Darren Jun 26 '12 at 15:49

At least, use the Leaks instrument to monitor memory leaks. The Allocations instrument won't actually show the memory leaks. If you run Analyze, you will see the lines that are potentially causing the leaks.

This is your code:

 PowerUpCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
 if (cell == nil) {
    NSLog(@"new cell");
    cell = [[PowerUpCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
 }

You see, cell is not going to be nil... This is stated in the API doc for dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier::

Return Value

A UITableViewCell object with the associated identifier or nil if no such object exists in the reusable-cell queue.

Anyway, if there are leaks, maybe they are very much caused by:

_singleUseArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

and

_fullUseArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

When you declared

NSMutableArray *_singleUseArray;
NSMutableArray *_fullUseArray;

I think, by default both were assigned with a __strong qualifier. I'm not really sure but this could be the real cause of the problem. How about declaring this instead?

NSMutableArray * __weak _singleUseArray;
NSMutableArray * __weak _fullUseArray;

Also, before declaring

_singleUseArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

and

_fullUseArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

how about assigning it first to nil to remove the previous reference?

_singleUseArray = nil;
_singleUseArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

and

_fulUseArray = nil;
_fullUseArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
share|improve this answer
    
I did use the leak tool and it didn't show a leak here, even though the memory increases each time to view is loaded. – Darren Jun 29 '12 at 6:40
    
Taking the array init out completely still has the problem :-( – Darren Jun 29 '12 at 11:30
    
I get 1 memory leak show up, but I don't think it's related. It says responsible frame=[NSURL(NSURL) path] and when I click it it looks like it has something to do with the Storyboard loading. – Darren Jun 29 '12 at 11:32
    
How much memory leak did you get? At least now you have something to look at. – yoninja Jul 1 '12 at 23:36
    
Please see my final comment below my question. I fixed the problem by changing the IBOutlet to strong and not weak. – Darren Jul 2 '12 at 7:10

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