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I need to find n lowest (which are not 0) from array of doubles (let's call the array samples). I need to do this many times in a loop, thus the speed of execution is crucial. I tried first sorting the array and then taking the first 10 values (which are not 0), however, although Array.Sort is said to be fast, it became the bottleneck:

const int numLowestSamples = 10;

double[] samples;

double[] lowestSamples = new double[numLowestSamples];

for (int count = 0; count < iterations; count++) // iterations typically around 2600000
{
    samples = whatever;
    Array.Sort(samples);
    lowestSamples = samples.SkipWhile(x => x == 0).Take(numLowestSamples).ToArray();
}

Thus I tried a different, but less clean solution, by first reading in the first n values, sorting them, then looping through all other values in samples checking if the value is smaller than the last value in the sorted lowestSamples array. If the value is lower then replace it with the one in the array and sort the array again. This turned out to be approximately 5 times faster:

const int numLowestSamples = 10;

double[] samples;

List<double> lowestSamples = new List<double>();

for (int count = 0; count < iterations; count++) // iterations typically around 2600000
{
    samples = whatever;

    lowestSamples.Clear();

    // Read first n values
    int i = 0;
    do
    {
        if (samples[i] > 0)
            lowestSamples.Add(samples[i]);

        i++;
    } while (lowestSamples.Count < numLowestSamples)

    // Sort the array
    lowestSamples.Sort();

    for (int j = numLowestSamples; j < samples.Count; j++) // samples.Count is typically 3600
    {
        // if value is larger than 0, but lower than last/highest value in lowestSamples
        // write value to array (replacing the last/highest value), then sort array so
        // last value in array still is the highest
        if (samples[j] > 0 && samples[j] < lowestSamples[numLowestSamples - 1])
        {
            lowestSamples[numLowestSamples - 1] = samples[j];
            lowestSamples.Sort();
        }
    }
}

Although this works relatively fast, I wanted to challenge anyone to come up with an even faster and better solution.

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4  
I wonder if maintaining a min-heap is a good solution here. –  ChaosPandion Jun 26 '12 at 14:40
    
ChaosPandion: Beat me by 5 seconds ;) –  robbrit Jun 26 '12 at 14:41
    
If this is something that is called once is the performace gain worth the extra work / complexity (in terms of code maintainability)? –  Jake1164 Jun 26 '12 at 14:44
    
u forgot to increment i, but we get it –  Les Jun 26 '12 at 15:16
1  
Thanks for all the answers! I tested using QuickSelect, but this was (at least for the tests I did) approx. 3 times as slow than just looping through the collection once. As far as the Fibonacci Heap goes, I must admit I am unsure how to implement it. I ended up fine tuning my algorithm by not sorting the lowestSamples every time; rather inserting in place, like suggested. In addition using variable to store value of samples[j] rather than calling samples[j] multiple times (like in tumtumtum's code) also helped. With these adjustments I was able to almost half the time of execution. –  Roger Saele Jul 1 '12 at 18:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of repeatedly sorting lowestSamples, just insert the sample where it would sit:

int samplesCount = samples.Count;

for (int j = numLowestSamples; j < samplesCount; j++)
{
    double sample = samples[j];

    if (sample > 0 && sample < currentMax)
    {
        int k;

        for (k = 0; k < numLowestSamples; k++)
        {
           if (sample < lowestSamples[k])
           {
              Array.Copy(lowestSamples, k, lowestSamples, k + 1, numLowestSamples - k - 1);
              lowestSamples[k] = sample;

              break;
           }
        }

        if (k == numLowestSamples)
        {
           lowestSamples[numLowestSamples - 1] = sample;
        }

        currentMax = lowestSamples[numLowestSamples - 1];
    }
}

Now, if numLowestSamples needs to be quite large (approaching the size of samples.count) then you may want to use a priority queue that may be faster (generally will be O(logn) for inserting the new sample rather than O(n/2) where n is numLowestSamples). The priority queue would be able to efficiently insert the new value and knock off the largest value on O(logn) time.

With numLowestSamples at 10, there's really no need for it -- especially since you're only dealing with doubles and not a complex data structure. With a heap and small numLowestSamples, the overhead of allocating memory for the heap nodes (most priority queues use heaps) would probably be greater than any searching/inserting efficiency gains (testing is important).

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You could possibly squeeze a bit more performance by removing the k for loop and using Array.BinarySearch. If the return value of Array.BinarySearch (k) is 0 or positive, then ignore (exact match found). If it's negative, make k=~k and do the Array.Copy as usual. Probably won't make a huge difference because log2(10) isn't going to be much better than O(10/2). –  tumtumtum Jul 2 '12 at 10:50

This is called a Selection Algorithm.

There are some general solutions on this Wiki page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selection_algorithm#Selecting_k_smallest_or_largest_elements

(but you'd have to do a bit of work to convert to c#)

You could use a QuickSelect algorithm to find the nth lowest element, and then iterate through the array to get at each element <= that one.

There's an example QuickSelect in c# here: http://dpatrickcaldwell.blogspot.co.uk/2009/03/more-ilist-extension-methods.html

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I think you may want to try maintaining a min-heap and measure the performance difference. Here is a data structure called a Fibonacci heap that I've been working on. It probably could use a bit of work but you can at least test my hypothesis.

public sealed class FibonacciHeap<TKey, TValue>
{
    readonly List<Node> _root = new List<Node>();
    int _count;
    Node _min;

    public void Push(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        Insert(new Node {
            Key = key,
            Value = value
        });
    }       

    public KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> Peek()
    {
        if (_min == null)
            throw new InvalidOperationException();
        return new KeyValuePair<TKey,TValue>(_min.Key, _min.Value);
    }       

    public KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> Pop()
    {
        if (_min == null)
            throw new InvalidOperationException();
        var min = ExtractMin();
        return new KeyValuePair<TKey,TValue>(min.Key, min.Value);
    }

    void Insert(Node node)
    {
        _count++;
        _root.Add(node);
        if (_min == null)
        {
            _min = node;
        }
        else if (Comparer<TKey>.Default.Compare(node.Key, _min.Key) < 0)
        {
            _min = node;
        }
    }

    Node ExtractMin()
    {
        var result = _min;
        if (result == null)
            return null;
        foreach (var child in result.Children)
        {
            child.Parent = null;
            _root.Add(child);
        }
        _root.Remove(result);
        if (_root.Count == 0)
        {
            _min = null;
        }
        else
        {
            _min = _root[0];
            Consolidate();
        }
        _count--;
        return result;
    }

    void Consolidate()
    {
        var a = new Node[UpperBound()];
        for (int i = 0; i < _root.Count; i++)
        {
            var x = _root[i];
            var d = x.Children.Count;
            while (true)
            {   
                var y = a[d];
                if (y == null)
                    break;                  
                if (Comparer<TKey>.Default.Compare(x.Key, y.Key) > 0)
                {
                    var t = x;
                    x = y;
                    y = t;
                }
                _root.Remove(y);
                i--;
                x.AddChild(y);
                y.Mark = false;
                a[d] = null;
                d++;
            }
            a[d] = x;
        }
        _min = null;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
        {
            var n = a[i];
            if (n == null)
                continue;
            if (_min == null)
            {
                _root.Clear();
                _min = n;
            }
            else
            {
                if (Comparer<TKey>.Default.Compare(n.Key, _min.Key) < 0)
                {
                    _min = n;
                }
            }
            _root.Add(n);
        }
    }

    int UpperBound()
    {
        return (int)Math.Floor(Math.Log(_count, (1.0 + Math.Sqrt(5)) / 2.0)) + 1;
    }

    class Node
    {
        public TKey Key;
        public TValue Value;
        public Node Parent;
        public List<Node> Children = new List<Node>();
        public bool Mark;

        public void AddChild(Node child)
        {
            child.Parent = this;
            Children.Add(child);
        }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return string.Format("({0},{1})", Key, Value);
        }
    }
}
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Ideally, you'd only want to make one pass over the collection, so your solution is pretty slick. However, you're resorting the entire sub list with every insertion when you only need to promote the numbers ahead of it. However, sorting 10 elements is almost negligible and enhancing this wouldn't really give you much. Worst case scenario (in terms of wasted performance) for your solution is if you have the 9 lowest numbers from the beginning, so with each subsequent number you find that's < lowestSamples[numLowestSamples - 1], you'd be sorting an already sorted list (which is the worst case scenario for the QuickSort).

Bottom line, since you're using so few numbers, there's not a lot of mathematical improvement you can make given the overhead of using a managed language to do this.

Kudos on the cool algorithm!

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Two different ideas:

  1. Instead of sorting the array, just perform a single Insertion Sort pass on it. You already know the newly added item will be the only one that's unordered, so use that knowledge.
  2. Have a look at Heap Sort. It builds a binary max-heap (if you want to sort smallest to largest), then starts removing elements from the heap by swapping the max element at index 0 with the last element that's still part of the heap. Now if you pretended to sort the array from largest to smallest element, you could stop the sort after having sorted 10 elements. The 10 elements at the end of the array will be the smallest, the remaining array is still a binary heap in array representation. I'm not sure how that will compare to the Quicksort-based selection algorithm on Wikipedia. Building the heap will always be done for the entire array, no matter how many elements you want to select.
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I think your idea is correct. I.e., one pass through and keeping a minimum sized sorted data struct is in general, the fastest. Your performance improvements to this are optimizations.

Your optimizations would be: 1) you are sorting your results every pass through. This might be fastest for small sizes, it is not the fastest for larger sets. Consider maybe two algorithms, one for below a given threshold and one (like a heap sort) for above the threshold. 2) keep track of any value that must be removed from your minimum set (which you currently do by looking at the last element). You can skip inserting and sorting any values greater than or equal to any value that gets kicked out.

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