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How does the (function() {})() construct work and why do people use it?

Why do the modern JavaScript files use constructs like:

(function () {
   // some real code
 }());

I.e. I understand that an anonymous function is being created and then called immediately, with no parameters passed... But why do it this way and not just call some real code? And what is the outer pair of round brackets for?

In particular I'm staring at the file js/start.js at Github:

(function() {
    "use strict";

    wooga.castle.GRID_UNIT = 48;
    wooga.castle.IMAGES_BASE_URL = "images/entities/";

    (function () {
        var style = document.createElement('div').style,
            prefix;
        var candidates = {
            webkit: 'webkitTransform',
            moz:    'MozTransform', // 'M' is uppercased
            ms:     'msTransform',
            o:      'oTransform',
            '':     'transform'
        };
        for (var prefix in candidates) {
            var candidate = candidates[prefix];
            if ('undefined' !== typeof style[candidate]) {
                wooga.castle.prefix = prefix;
                wooga.castle.prefixedTransform = candidate;
                break;
            }
        }
    }());

    // XXX why the 2 wrapped "function"s here? XXX

    wooga.castle.isNativeWrapper = function() {
        var result = !wooga.castle.capabilities.desktop && !wooga.castle.capabilities.android && (! /Safari/.test(navigator.userAgent));
        wooga.castle.isNativeWrapper = function () {
            return result;
        };
        return result;
    };
}());

With my basic JavaScript and jQuery skills I understand the single commands listed above, but I don't get why are they wrapped inside of several functions. Can't we just call:

    "use strict";

    wooga.castle.GRID_UNIT = 48;
    wooga.castle.IMAGES_BASE_URL = "images/entities/";
    var style = document.createElement('div').style,
        prefix;
    var candidates = {
        webkit: 'webkitTransform',
        moz:    'MozTransform', // 'M' is uppercased
        ms:     'msTransform',
        o:      'oTransform',
        '':     'transform'
    };
    for (var prefix in candidates) {
        var candidate = candidates[prefix];
        if ('undefined' !== typeof style[candidate]) {
            wooga.castle.prefix = prefix;
            wooga.castle.prefixedTransform = candidate;
            break;
        }
    }

    wooga.castle.isNativeWrapper = !wooga.castle.capabilities.desktop && !wooga.castle.capabilities.android && (! /Safari/.test(navigator.userAgent));
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marked as duplicate by dystroy, Wiseguy, clyfe, apsillers, kapa Jun 26 '12 at 17:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I've seen ((function() {})()) but not (function() {}()). –  kevin628 Jun 26 '12 at 14:48
    
@kevin628: I've never seen ((function() {})()). That's way too many ()s. The other way is: (function(){})() –  Rocket Hazmat Jun 26 '12 at 14:49
    
@Rocket Looks like they are the same thing, at least in Chrome. One just has fewer mind-bending ()s. I learned something new today. –  kevin628 Jun 26 '12 at 14:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is done so the code inside doesn't interfere with variables in the global scope.

For example:

var myLibrary = {};
var _privateVar = [];

Now, both of these are global. But, I don't want that. So, if I make a function, I can make a new scope.

(function(){
    window.myLibrary = {}; // global
    var _privateVar = []; // private
}());
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1  
Ok thanks, and why are the outer round brackets ( ..... ); in your code needed? –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '12 at 14:49
3  
@AlexanderFarber: The outer brackets are because function(){}() is a syntax error. The outer brackets turn it into an expression. –  Rocket Hazmat Jun 26 '12 at 14:50
1  
Ok, and why the double-wrapping of isNativeWrapper at the end of my code? –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '12 at 14:51
2  
@AlexanderFarber: I don't know. That seems redundant. –  Rocket Hazmat Jun 26 '12 at 14:52
    
Is it some caching (a "closure"?), to be used later when PhoneGap kicks in? (Just a wild guess, I don't understand much there :-) –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '12 at 14:57

It's called a closure, it's designed to encapsulate code so that variables and functions are not declared in the global scope, preventing conflicts.

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This is done to prevent "Pollution of the global scope". By surrounding the code with an anonymous function the variables exist only in the scope of the function thus preventing possible conflicts in the global namespace.

The outer brackets are needed because function(){} itself is a declaration and you need to turn it into an expression by adding either (...) or and ! in front of it in order to execute it.

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