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I need to emulate the MATLAB function find, which returns the linear indices for the nonzero elements of an array. For example:

>> a = zeros(4,4)
a =

     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0
>> a(1,1) = 1
>> a(4,4) = 1
>> find(a)
ans =

     1
    16

numpy has the similar function nonzero, but it returns a tuple of index arrays. For example:

In [1]: from numpy import *
In [2]: a = zeros((4,4))

In [3]: a[0,0] = 1

In [4]: a[3,3] = 1

In [5]: a
Out[5]: 
array([[ 1.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.]])

In [6]: nonzero(a)
Out[6]: (array([0, 3]), array([0, 3]))

Is there a function that gives me the linear indices without calculating them myself?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

numpy has you covered:

>>> np.flatnonzero(a)
array([ 0, 15])

Internally it's doing exactly what Sven Marnach suggested.

>>> print inspect.getsource(np.flatnonzero)
def flatnonzero(a):
    """
    Return indices that are non-zero in the flattened version of a.

    This is equivalent to a.ravel().nonzero()[0].

    [more documentation]

    """
    return a.ravel().nonzero()[0]
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The easiest solution is to flatten the array before calling nonzero():

>>> a.ravel().nonzero()
(array([ 0, 15]),)
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If you have matplotlib installed it's probably already there (find that is) in matplotlib.mlab module, as well as some other functions intended for compatibility with matlab. And yes it's implemented the same way as flatnonzero.

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