Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I check if a program exists from a python script?

Let's say you want to check if wget or curl are available. We'll assume that they should be in path.

It would be the best to see a multiplatform solution but for the moment, Linux is enough.

Hints:

  • running the command and checking for return code is not always enough as some tools do return non 0 result even when you try --version.
  • nothing should be visible on screen when checking for the command

Also, I would appreciate a solution that that is more general, like is_tool(name)

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Test if executable exists in Python? –  Ciro Santilli Mar 25 at 13:06

7 Answers 7

The easiest way is to try to run the program with the desired parameters, and handle the exception if it doesn't exist:

try:
    subprocess.call(["wget", "your", "parameters", "here"])
except OSError as e:
    if e.errno == os.errno.ENOENT:
        # handle file not found error.
    else:
        # Something else went wrong while trying to run `wget`
        raise

This is a common pattern in Python: EAFP

share|improve this answer
    
right. for programs you know how to use, this is probably the best way to go about it. After all: expecting success often leads to cleaner code... –  Daren Thomas Jun 26 '12 at 15:06
    
@DarenThomas: For programs you don't know how to use, the information whether they exist or not doesn't seem to be too useful. :) –  Sven Marnach Jun 26 '12 at 15:07
    
I like your approach, but it does pollute the stdout and stderr. Also, it is not a function ;) –  sorin Jun 26 '12 at 15:08
    
@SorinSbarnea: How does this pollute stdout and stderr? Since I cannot think of any other reason for testing whether wget exists, I'm assuming you are going to run it anyway. –  Sven Marnach Jun 26 '12 at 15:14
    
Your solution will display output of the executed command, look at my solution, based on yours, which is totally quiet. stackoverflow.com/a/11210902/99834 –  sorin Jun 26 '12 at 15:38

You could use a subprocess call to the binary needed with :

  • "which" : *nix
  • "where" : Win 2003 and later (Xp has an addon)

to get the executable path (supposing it is in the environment path).

import os 
import platform
import subprocess

cmd = "where" if platform.system() == "Windows" else "which"
try: 
    subprocess.call([cmd, your_executable_to_check_here])
except: 
    print "No executable"

or just use Ned Batchelder's wh.py script, that is a "which" cross platform implementation:

http://nedbatchelder.com/code/utilities/wh_py.html

share|improve this answer
up vote 2 down vote accepted
import subprocess
import os

def is_tool(name):
    try:
        devnull = open(os.devnull)
        subprocess.Popen([name], stdout=devnull, stderr=devnull).communicate()
    except OSError as e:
        if e.errno == os.errno.ENOENT:
            return False
    return True
share|improve this answer
2  
This would leave the subprocess running indefinitely if it fills the pipe buffers of either stdout or stderr. If you want to run the process at all just to check if it exists, you should use open os.devnull and use it as stdout and stderr. –  Sven Marnach Jun 26 '12 at 15:50
    
not likely to happen but you are right, thanks. –  sorin Jun 26 '12 at 16:35
    
Many tools output usage information when called without parameters, which could easily fill the pipe buffers. I was wrong with my initial comment anyway – I missed the call to comunnicate(), which was beyond the right margin of the code box, and I did not scroll far enough to the right. The method Popen.communicate() takes care of avoiding any deadlocks. –  Sven Marnach Jun 26 '12 at 16:44
import os
import subprocess


def is_tool(prog):
    for dir in os.environ['PATH'].split(os.pathsep):
        if os.path.exists(os.path.join(dir, prog)):
            try:
                subprocess.call([os.path.join(dir, prog)],
                                stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
                                stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
            except OSError, e:
                return False
            return True
    return False
share|improve this answer
    
This is not platform-independent: If you really want to replicate OS functionality, you should at least use os.path.join() and os.pathsep. –  Sven Marnach Jun 26 '12 at 15:01
    
(I also edited in os.pathsep – on Windows, PATH is semicolon-delimited.) –  Sven Marnach Jun 26 '12 at 15:05
    
good catch, did my edit overwrite your pathsep? –  ryanday Jun 26 '12 at 15:06

I would probably shell out to which wget or which curl and check that the result ends in the name of the program you are using. The magic of unix :)

Actually, all you need to do is check the return code of which. So... using our trusty subprocess module:

import
rc = subprocess.call('which wget')
if rc == 0:
    print 'wget installed!'
else:
    print 'wget missing in path!'

Note that I tested this on windows with cygwin... If you want to figure out how to implement which in pure python, i suggest you check here: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/pycoreutils (oh dear - it seems they don't supply which. Time for a friendly nudge?)

share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't this try to run a program named "which wget", i.e. with a space in the filename? –  Sven Marnach Jun 26 '12 at 15:04
    
@SvenMarnach, right! I got the syntax all wrong :( oh dear. –  Daren Thomas Jun 26 '12 at 18:41

A slight modification to @SvenMarnach's code that addresses the issue of printing to the standard output stream. If you use the subprocess.check_output() function rather than subprocess.call() then you can handle the string that is normally printed to standard out in your code and still catch exceptions and the exit status code.

If you want to suppress the standard output stream in the terminal, don’t print the std out string that is returned from check_output:

import subprocess
import os
try:
    stdout_string = subprocess.check_output(["wget", "--help"], stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
    # print(stdout_string)
except subprocess.CalledProcessError as cpe:
    print(cpe.returncode)
    print(cpe.output)
except OSError as e:
    if e.errno == os.errno.ENOENT:
        print(e)
    else:
        # Something else went wrong while trying to run `wget`
        print(e)

The non-zero exit status code and output string are raised in the CalledProcessError as subprocess.CalledProcessError.returncode and subprocess.CalledProcessError.output so you can do whatever you'd like with them.

If you want to print the executable's standard output to the terminal, print the string that is returned:

import subprocess
import os
try:
    stdout_string = subprocess.check_output(["wget", "--help"], stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
    print(stdout_string)
except subprocess.CalledProcessError as cpe:
    print(cpe.returncode)
    print(cpe.output)
except OSError as e:
    if e.errno == os.errno.ENOENT:
        print(e)
    else:
        # Something else went wrong while trying to run `wget`
        print(e)

print() adds an extra newline to the string. If you want to eliminate that (and write std error to the std err stream instead of the std out stream as shown with the print() statements above), use sys.stdout.write(string) and sys.stderr.write(string) instead of print():

import subprocess
import os
import sys
try:
    stdout_string = subprocess.check_output(["bogus"], stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
    sys.stdout.write(stdout_string)
except subprocess.CalledProcessError as cpe:
    sys.stderr.write(cpe.returncode)
    sys.stderr.write(cpe.output)
except OSError as e:
    if e.errno == os.errno.ENOENT:
        sys.stderr.write(e.strerror)
    else:
        # Something else went wrong while trying to run `wget`
        sys.stderr.write(e.strerror)
share|improve this answer

For Debian Based systems:

i tested the scripts from above and they wasn't really good. They run the programs and that is annoying because it takes a lot of time and you have to close the programs. I found a solution getting the installed packages with aptitude, and then reading the list.

You can use different kinds of commands to get different kinds of 'installed packages' Exemples: http://askubuntu.com/questions/17823/how-to-list-all-installed-packages

The two that i found the best was:

dpkg --get-selections           # big list
aptitude search '~i!~M' -F      # great list

You can run them in the terminal to test them.


The python function:

import os,sys

def check_for_program(program):

    if not os.path.exists("/tmp/program_list"):
        os.system("aptitude search '~i!~M' -F > /tmp/program_list")

    with open('/tmp/program_list') as f:
        for line in f:
            if program in line:
                return True
    return False
share|improve this answer
1  
This only works on Debian based systems, and will fail badly when packages are renamed, which sometimes happen. –  Thomas Petazzoni Jun 14 at 10:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.