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I am currently working on a program that traverses through various directories to ensure that specific files are present by using File.Exists().

The application has been claiming that certain files do not exist when they actually do, and I recently discovered that this error was due to the path being too long.

I realize there are questions on SO that address File.Exists() returning incorrect values, but none seem to solve this particular issue.

Renaming the directories and files to shorten the path is not really an option, so I'm not sure what to do at this point. Is there a work-around that would solve this problem?

The code in use is nothing special (I've cut out some irrelevant code), but I will include it below just in case it helps.

    private void checkFile(string path)
    {
        if (!File.Exists(path))
            Console.WriteLine("   *  File: " + path + " does not exist.");
    }
share|improve this question
3  
It's not returning false incorrectly. It's obeying the documentation: "The Exists method returns false if any error occurs while trying to determine if the specified file exists. This can occur in situations that raise exceptions such as passing a file name with invalid characters or too many characters, a failing or missing disk, or if the caller does not have permission to read the file." – Jon Skeet Jun 26 '12 at 15:13
    
Are the files located in a special folder? – UrbanEsc Jun 26 '12 at 15:13
    
Why are you checking in the first place? The file system is volatile, so you're just setting up a race condition. You still have to be prepared to catch an exception when the file is deleted between making the .Exists check and using the file, and in the meantime the call to .Exists() causes an extra (and very expensive) additional trip out to disk. Better to put your energy and code into that exception handler. – Joel Coehoorn Jun 26 '12 at 15:14
    
See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1880321/… – Esoteric Screen Name Jun 26 '12 at 15:16
1  
Ok, I found a solution that works using DirectoryInfo and FileInfo. It's not necessarilly efficient, or pretty, but it does work. – Jon Senchyna Jun 26 '12 at 16:15
up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is ugly and inefficient, but it DOES get around the MAX_PATH limitation:

const int MAX_PATH = 260;

private static void checkPath(string path)
{
    if (path.Length >= MAX_PATH)
    {
        checkFile_LongPath(path);
    }
    else if (!File.Exists(path))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("   *  File: " + path + " does not exist.");
    }
}

And here is the checkFile_LongPath function:

private static void checkFile_LongPath(string path)
{
    string[] subpaths = path.Split('\\');
    StringBuilder sbNewPath = new StringBuilder(subpaths[0]);
    // Build longest subpath that is less than MAX_PATH characters
    for (int i = 1; i < subpaths.Length; i++)
    {
        if (sbNewPath.Length + subpaths[i].Length >= MAX_PATH)
        {
            subpaths = subpaths.Skip(i).ToArray();
            break;
        }
        sbNewPath.Append("\\" + subpaths[i]);
    }
    DirectoryInfo dir = new DirectoryInfo(sbNewPath.ToString());
    bool foundMatch = dir.Exists;
    if (foundMatch)
    {
        // Make sure that all of the subdirectories in our path exist.
        // Skip the last entry in subpaths, since it is our filename.
        // If we try to specify the path in dir.GetDirectories(), 
        // We get a max path length error.
        int i = 0;
        while(i < subpaths.Length - 1 && foundMatch)
        {
            foundMatch = false;
            foreach (DirectoryInfo subDir in dir.GetDirectories())
            {
                if (subDir.Name == subpaths[i])
                {
                    // Move on to the next subDirectory
                    dir = subDir;
                    foundMatch = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            i++;
        }
        if (foundMatch)
        {
            foundMatch = false;
            // Now that we've gone through all of the subpaths, see if our file exists.
            // Once again, If we try to specify the path in dir.GetFiles(), 
            // we get a max path length error.
            foreach (FileInfo fi in dir.GetFiles())
            {
                if (fi.Name == subpaths[subpaths.Length - 1])
                {
                    foundMatch = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    // If we didn't find a match, write to the console.
    if (!foundMatch)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("   *  File: " + path + " does not exist.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This worked perfectly! Thanks for sticking with the question! – Keplah Jun 26 '12 at 17:17
1  
Do note that is always assumes you're looking for a file, not a directory. – Jon Senchyna Jun 26 '12 at 17:19

From MSDN - Naming Files, Paths, and Namespaces:

In the Windows API (with some exceptions discussed in the following paragraphs), the maximum length for a path is MAX_PATH, which is defined as 260 characters.

...

The Windows API has many functions that also have Unicode versions to permit an extended-length path for a maximum total path length of 32,767 characters. This type of path is composed of components separated by backslashes, each up to the value returned in the lpMaximumComponentLength parameter of the GetVolumeInformation function (this value is commonly 255 characters). To specify an extended-length path, use the "\\?\" prefix. For example, "\\?\D:\very long path".

...

Because you cannot use the "\\?\" prefix with a relative path, relative paths are always limited to a total of MAX_PATH characters.

(Emphasis added)

If all your paths are full paths, you could update your code to use the extended-length path specifier as follows:

const longPathSpecifier = @"\\?";

private void checkFile(string path)
{
    // Add the long-path specifier if it's missing
    string longPath = (path.StartsWith(longPathSpecifier) ? path : longPathSpecifier  + path);

    if (!File.Exists(longPath))
    {
        // Print the original path
         Console.WriteLine("   *  File: " + path + " does not exist.");
    }
}

Update:

For file I/O, the "\?\" prefix to a path string tells the Windows APIs to disable all string parsing and to send the string that follows it straight to the file system. For example, if the file system supports large paths and file names, you can exceed the MAX_PATH limits that are otherwise enforced by the Windows APIs.

At least on my system (using Windows 7), long file names are not supported, so I can't verify if the above solution will work for you.

Update: I found a solution that does work, but it is fairly ugly. Here's what I did in pseudo-code:

  1. Split the path into an array of directories
  2. Get the longest portion of your path that is less than 260 characters (MAX_PATH).
  3. Create a DirectoryInfo for that portion of your path ("dir" for future reference).
  4. For the remaining directories in your path:
    a. Call dir.GetDirectories() and check if the next directory is contained in the results
    b. if so, set dir to that DirectoryInfo and keep digging
    c. if not, then the path doesn't exist
  5. Once we've gone through all of the directories leading up to our file, call dir.GetFiles() and see if our file exists in the returned FileInfo objects.
share|improve this answer
1  
Does File.Exist support `\?\` paths? Most .net APIs don't. – CodesInChaos Jun 26 '12 at 15:19
    
I can test it out and get back to you. – Jon Senchyna Jun 26 '12 at 15:26
    
Thanks for the response. I'll give this a shot. – Keplah Jun 26 '12 at 15:41
2  
It looks like both File.Exists(path) and new FileInfo(path).Exists do not work with "\\?\", at least for my file system (Windows 7). – Jon Senchyna Jun 26 '12 at 15:42
    
@JonSenchyna Same here... It doesn't seem to like that. – Keplah Jun 26 '12 at 15:50

Never had the issue myself, someone on another SO post suggests opening a handle to the file, thus avoiding the whole 'exists' check in the first place. Not sure if this still has the 'long filename' issue:

It's the second answer here:

Check if a file/directory exists: is there a better way?

Not sure if that's useful :P

share|improve this answer
1  
You sort of missed the entire problem the author had. He is trying to verify something exists, and the method is returning false, he would still have to locate the file in order to get a handle to the file. – Ramhound Jun 26 '12 at 15:31
3  
@Ramhound I think you're missing the point of this answer. You can attempt to open the file, and if the file doesn't exist it will throw an IOException that you can handle and filter (i.e "file not found" or "file in use") – Jason Larke Jun 26 '12 at 15:39
    
Opening the file is the same thing as checking if it exists - if the file can't be opened you get an exception, the only difference is that it might avoid the long filename issue, like I said, don't know if it's useful – Charleh Jun 26 '12 at 15:48
    
Opening the file using File or FileInfo has the same path-length limitation as checking if the file exists. – Jon Senchyna Jun 26 '12 at 16:49
    
Thought that might be the case - like I said, might not be useful :D – Charleh Jun 26 '12 at 17:05

You need to P/Invoke Win32 APIs to get this to work properly:

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError = true)]
    static extern uint GetFileAttributes(string lpFileName);

    public static bool DirectoryExists(string path)
    {
        uint attributes = GetFileAttributes(path.StartsWith(@"\\?\") ? path : @"\\?\" + path);
        if (attributes != 0xFFFFFFFF)
        {
            return ((FileAttributes)attributes).HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory);
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    public static bool FileExists(string path)
    {
        uint attributes = GetFileAttributes(path.StartsWith(@"\\?\") ? path : @"\\?\" + path);
        if (attributes != 0xFFFFFFFF)
        {
            return !((FileAttributes)attributes).HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory);
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
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