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I am writing a program that a part renders a bitmap font in CP437.

In a function that renders the text with I want to be able to check whether a char is available in CP437 before the encoding conversion, like:

public static void DrawCharacter(this Graphics g, char c)
{
    if (char_exist_in_encoding(Encoding.GetEncoding(437), c) {
        byte[] src = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(c.ToString());
        byte[] dest = Encoding.Convert(Encoding.Unicode, Encoding.GetEncoding(437), src);
        DrawCharacter(g, dest[0]); // Call the void(this Graphics, byte) overload
    }
}

Without the check, any characters outside CP437 will result in a '?' (63, 0x3F). I want to hide any invalid characters completely. Is there an implementation of char_exist_in_encoding other than the following stupid approach?

private static bool char_exist_in_encoding(Encoding e, char c)
{
    if (c == '?')
        return true;
    byte[] src = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(c.ToString());
    byte[] dest = Encoding.Convert(Encoding.Unicode, e, src);
    if (dest[0] == 0x3F)
        return false;
    return true;
}


Perhaps not very relevant, but the bitmap is created like this:

Bitmap b = new Bitmap(256 * 8, 16);
Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(b);
g.TextRenderingHint = System.Drawing.Text.TextRenderingHint.SingleBitPerPixelGridFit;
Font f = new Font("Whatever 8x16 bitmap font", 16, GraphicsUnit.Pixel);
for (byte i = 0; i < 255; i++)
{
    byte[] arr = Encoding.Convert(Encoding.GetEncoding(437), Encoding.Unicode, new byte[] { i });
    char c = Encoding.Unicode.GetChars(arr)[0];
    g.DrawString(c.ToString(), f, Brushes.Black, i * 8 - 3, 0); // Don't know why it needs a 3px offset
}
b.Save(@"D:\chars.png");
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1  
Please see "Stack Overflow does not allow tags in titles". –  John Saunders Jun 26 '12 at 15:15
    
@JohnSaunders Thanks, will remember that –  Alvin Wong Jun 26 '12 at 15:16
1  
Maybe you need EncoderFallback? –  Vlad Jun 26 '12 at 15:18
    
What's an example of a character that's outside CP437? I tried converting every byte from 0 through 254, and they all seemed to work. –  Michael Liu Jun 26 '12 at 15:41
    
@MichaelLiu Most Unicode characters like Chinese, Japanese, Korean, etc –  Alvin Wong Jun 26 '12 at 15:45
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks to Vlad, after a bit research on EncoderFallback I finally saw an example in MSDN

My working (perhaps temporary working) code is:

public static void DrawCharacter(this Graphics g, char c)
{
    byte[] src = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(c.ToString());
    byte[] dest = Encoding.Convert(Encoding.Unicode, Encoding.GetEncoding(437, new EncoderReplacementFallback(" "), new DecoderReplacementFallback(" ")), src);
    DrawCharacter(g, dest[0]);
}

It replace invalid characters to a space " ".

P.S. I originally used an empty string "" as the replacement but finally I decided to use the space character, because it looks cleaner.

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