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I am trying to compare two variables in which are usually strings. These variables are generated from a database, $var1 from one db and $var2 from another. When I compare them in a loop I use the ne operator. However there are times when I these variables are null or undef. The comparison is done as follows:

foreach my $var1 (@$varlist)
{
  if ($var1 ne $var2)
  {
    print "vars are not equal";
  }
}

The issue is that if $var1 or $var2 are undef then I get an error. However, I need to be able to compare then values as undef b/c I will have to write them. I considered converting the variables to a string 'NULL' and then back but that seemed inefficient.

Any way to fix this? Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Check if they are defined, too:

foreach my $var1 (@$varlist)
    if ( ! defined $var1 || ! defined $var2 || $var1 ne $var2 )
        print "vars are not equal";

This prints that they're not equal if both are undefined. If you want another behaviour, just change the if expression.

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Why wouldn't that print the expression if just $var1 is not defined? –  Prateek Jun 26 '12 at 16:05
    
This was more the basis for my answer which is why I selected it. The final answer looked like this: unless ((!defined $var1 && !defined $var2) && (defined $var1 && defined $var2 && $var1 eq $var2)) –  Prateek Jun 26 '12 at 19:21
1  
A shorter version using xor: if ((defined $var1 xor defined $var2) or $var1 ne $var2) –  Stefan Majewsky Jan 4 '13 at 15:01

It's not an error to compare undefined values, it's just a warning. I like using Perl's // operator (requires >=v5.10) in cases like this to ensure the operators are defined:

if (($var1 // '') ne ($var2 // '')) { ... }

will treat an undefined string as the empty string during the comparison, for example.

Since you want the operands to have a specific value when they are printed (NULL was one possibility), you could also consider using the //= operator.

if (($var1 //= 'NULL') ne ($var2 //= 'NULL')) {
   print "$var1 and $var2 are not equal";
}

will set the value of $var1 or $var2 to 'NULL' if they are undefined, and then perform the comparison.

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I like this concept, and will use it somewhere else, but it was not specifically what I was looking for. –  Prateek Jun 26 '12 at 19:20

It seems that you are practicing safe Perl by using use warnings; but now you may have come to the point where you selectively turn them off. These warnings are for your own protection, however if you know that you are going to be comparing possibly undef strings, just turn them off for a little bit (the no command is local to the enclosing block, so they turn back on).

use strict;
use warnings;

foreach my $var1 (@$varlist)
{
  no warnings 'uninitialized';
  if ($var1 ne $var2)
  {
    print "vars are not equal";
  }
}
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One caveat with this advice is that a string comparison of undef and and empty string will return true - which may or may not be what is required. –  Grant McLean Oct 29 at 7:52

Use the defined function to determine this:

http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/defined.html

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