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I wonder if there is some theory/tool available to replace a piece of code that contains function calls, into code where all function call has been replaced by their respective code.

like

main()
{
   fun();
}

fun()
{
   int i;
   fun2();
}

fun2()
{
   int j;
}

into

main()
{
   int i;
   int j;
}

I know there is a lot to take care of, like local variable names, recursive calls, external function calls etc etc. .. ..

I also know that it may not be at all useful, but still does something like this exist? even in theory?

should I call it advance per-processor unit :)

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9  
I would call it an optimizing compiler :) –  JoeFish Jun 26 '12 at 16:01
1  
The C Preprocessor does stuff eerily similar to this. –  robert Jun 26 '12 at 16:02
1  
Handling the local variables is actually pretty easy if you keep the {}, i.e. main() { {int i;} {int j} } –  larsmans Jun 26 '12 at 16:02
2  
Compilers can do inline generation of code from functions. Some program verifiers work by basically flattening a program this way as well. The former, however, don't generally make their intermediate results available in readable form. The latter would need considerable rewriting to produce the correct kind of result at all. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 26 '12 at 16:03
1  
Which language is this? Your functions have no return values, so they don't match C or C++. –  juanchopanza Jun 26 '12 at 16:37

1 Answer 1

The compiler can usually tell when it's a good idea to do this, and already automatically does inlining whenever needed. You can also suggest that a function should be inlined using the inline keyword before a function (note that it still doesn't actually force it, and the compiler might decide to avoid the inlining).It's generally not such a good idea to do this manually, as modern compilers tend to figure out the best possible inlinings on their own. This article explains inline functions really well, I found it very helpful

Edit 1:

There are several reasons why one might want to do that inlining you speak of. If you feel like your code is divided into many different functions reducing its clarity and making it overly verbose, you could try a refactoring tool, such as the one provided by the VAssist X Visual Studio plugin. Though this plugin doesn't really do what you suggest (I can't think of a tool that does), it can help move functions/ methods around with ease, allowing you to clean up your code.

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One thing: Using inline is a suggestion to the compiler; it doesn't force it to inline the function. Question 9.1 in the FAQ-Lite link explains this. –  chris Jun 26 '12 at 16:09
    
inline keyword does not force inlining. It's used mostly to avoid ODR violations. –  Cat Plus Plus Jun 26 '12 at 16:09
1  
The inline keyword does not actually force inlining. In fact many compilers ignore it as a hint for inlining and simply rely on their own heuristics. All inlining really does is allow the function to be defined in multiple translation units without causing linker errors: stackoverflow.com/a/157929/365496 –  bames53 Jun 26 '12 at 16:10
    
Thanks, updated the answer! –  Andrei Bârsan Jun 26 '12 at 16:13
1  
Some compilers have things like _forceinline which will force a function to be inlined. This isn't always possible (think recursive functions) –  jcoder Jun 26 '12 at 16:25

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