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I want to write a function which outputs a list. The function gets a list and outputs a new one. For example:

(0 0 1 2 2 1) -> (3 4 4 5 5 6)).

What it does is: the index+1 in the initial list is a value in the new list. And the that value is placed x times in the new list dependent on the value in the initial list.

(1 2) -> (1 2 2)
(0 3 0 3) -> (2 2 2 4 4 4)

So 3 is on the second position, the value is three so 2(2nd position) is placed 3 times in the new list.

I came up with this, which does not work

(defun change-list (list)
  (setq newlist '(1 2 3))
  (setq i 0) 
  (while (<= i (length list)) 
    (if (= (nth i list) 0)
      (concatenate 'list '0 'newlist)
    (concatenate 'list '(i) 'newlist))
    (+ i 1)
    (remove 0 newlist)))

The problem is mainly the fact that it does not recognize new variables. It gave me these errors: functions.lisp:27:26: warning: Undefined function referenced: while

functions.lisp:31:2: warning: Free reference to undeclared variable newlist assumed special. warning: Free reference to undeclared variable i assumed special.

Is there someone who understands this?


We were able to solve it ourselves:

(defun change-list (a) 
  (loop for j from 1 to (length a) by 1 append 
    (loop for i from 1 to (nth (- j 1) a) by 1 
      collect j )))

It is part of a larger assignment, and we did not get much education on lisp, more like: do it in lisp.

share|improve this question
    
I thought the whole point of lisp is that you can do so much with out having to have assignment (set, setq etc). Assignment makes things a lot harder to reason, so only use it where it has a good benefit. You don't need assignment for this problem. Rewrite without the use of assignment. –  richard Jun 26 '12 at 16:21
1  
is this homework? –  richard Jun 26 '12 at 16:21
2  
Which Lisp is that? –  Rainer Joswig Jun 26 '12 at 16:22
1  
I would propose to learn some basics of the Lisp dialect you are using before you try to program in it. Every basic language introduction tells you how to define local variables. –  Rainer Joswig Jun 26 '12 at 16:22
1  
see: groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/classes/6.001/abelson-sussman-lectures to learn lisp, or even just to learn to program better. –  richard Jun 26 '12 at 19:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can simplify your answer to this:

(defun change-list (list) 
  (loop for i in list and j from 1
        append (loop repeat i collect j)))
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Let's assume this is Common Lisp, I'll then list some problems in your code:

(defun change-list (list)
  (setq newlist '(1 2 3))

SETQ does not declare variables, it just sets them.

  (setq i 0) 
  (while (<= i (length list)) 

WHILE does not exist in Common Lisp.

    (if (= (nth i list) 0)
      (concatenate 'list '0 'newlist)

0 is not a list. Thus you can't concatenate it. CONCATENATE does not have a side effect. What ever you do here is lost. NEWLIST here is a symbol, not a list. Does not work.

      (concatenate 'list '(i) 'newlist))

i is not a variable here. Putting it into a list will have no. CONCATENATE does not have a side effect. What ever you do here is lost. NEWLIST here is a symbol, not a list. Does not work.

    (+ i 1)

The effect of the above is lost.

    (remove 0 newlist)

The effect of the above is lost.

    ))
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Basically, just another way to do the same thing:

(defun change-list (x)
  (let ((index 0))
    (mapcon
     #'(lambda (y)
         (incf index)
         (let ((z (car y)))
           (unless (zerop z)
             (make-list z :initial-element index)))) x)))

But may be useful for the purpose of learning / who knows what your professor expects.

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