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I work with Oracle 11g.
I have one table:

create table test (one number(2), two number(2));

There are 2 rows:

insert into test (one, two) values (1, 1);
insert into test (one, two) values (2, null);
commit;

Now I create an exceptions table:

create table exceptions(row_id rowid,
                       owner varchar2(30),
                       table_name varchar2(30),
                       constraint varchar2(30));

Now I want to create the primary key for test:

alter table test add constraint test_pk primary key (one, two) exceptions into exceptions;

Of course I get the following error: ORA-01449

But the row that caused the exception is not in the exception table?

Can anybody help me. Thanks in advance

Wolfgang

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1  
bash Oracle threads are apparently a quick way to get points...how is this +2 with not a single comment? The error you get is telling you the primary key fields cannot contain nulls. It doesn't mean Oracle exceptions don't work. Look at your table, do you see any contraints? –  tbone Jun 26 '12 at 16:46
2  
@tbone, this isn't about exception handling. This is about the "exceptions into" clause. What the OP is describing is exactly the case, and is a legitimate question as the documentation does not tell you this information. The problem is you can't create the constraint AND report exceptions in one step. How is this "bashing" Oracle? –  DCookie Jun 26 '12 at 17:31
1  
@DCookie I understand its about the "exceptions into" clause, but the title is "oracle exceptions do not work". Its not an Oracle issue (how can the constraint log exceptions when it cannot even be created, you must either create it first before loading nulls or do as you suggest as create it disabled). Once created, it can do its job. I just find it funny that I ran into several "why does Oracle suck" threads that immediately gain points based on, well, I don't know. For example,see stackoverflow.com/questions/11191299/…. –  tbone Jun 26 '12 at 17:39
2  
I would have to charitably assume in this case that the OP does not speak english as his first language, and is simply describing the problem from his perspective, namely, that exceptions are not working for him. –  DCookie Jun 26 '12 at 17:45
1  
Problem solved by re-wording the title. –  Ben Jun 26 '12 at 18:20
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In order to do this, you must first create the constraint disabled:

ALTER TABLE test ADD CONSTRAINT test_pk PRIMARY KEY (one, two) DISABLE;

Then, enable the constraint with exceptions:

ALTER TABLE TEST ENABLE CONSTRAINT test_pk EXCEPTIONS INTO exceptions;

Then you can select the results:

SQL> SELECT * FROM EXCEPTIONS;

ROW_ID             OWNER TABLE_NAME CONSTRAINT
------------------ ----- ---------- ----------
AAHpV4AAHAAApliAAB XXX   TEST       TEST_PK
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