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I might be being a bit thicky here but please answer me this. Consider the following code:

a=1;
while(a<=6) {
   console.log(a);
   a++;
}

If I run this I get values in the console from 1 to 6, and then another 6.

Now look at this:

a=1;
while(a<=6) {
    console.log(a);
    ++a;
}

Running this will now get me the values from 1 to 7.

Why is this happening? My understanding was that the statement block would only run if the expression evaluates to true. How can this be possible in the second of my examples? And why does 6 appear twice in the first? Very confusing for me.

If you can explain simply (I'm still learning) that would be great.

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can u show the full code because ++a; and a++; are same if they are individual statement and not composite with other statement. –  Romil Jun 26 '12 at 16:14
2  
The second example prints 1 through 6 -> jsfiddle.net/USYSH –  ManseUK Jun 26 '12 at 16:16
1  
possible duplicate of What's the difference between ++i and i++ in JavaScript –  epascarello Jun 26 '12 at 16:17
3  
@ManseUK not in Firefox it doesn't. The key ingredient is to do it from the browser JavaScript console, whose behavior is what's at issue here. The last number printed is not the result of a console.log() call. –  Pointy Jun 26 '12 at 16:18
1  
@epascarello this is not the same question as that. It's more about confusion over the console output. –  tybro0103 Jun 26 '12 at 16:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The console prints for you the value of the last statement evaluated. In the second case, you pre-increment, so the value of that is 7 and not 6 as in the first one.

Change you console.log() call to print more stuff and it'll be obvious:

console.log("a is: " + a);

You won't see that prefix on the last line.

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1  
That doesn't make sense to me at all. If the value was 7, why is it getting past the initial condition (ie a<=6)...to my mind that shouldn't happen. –  Mat Richardson Jun 26 '12 at 16:15
2  
It's not getting past the initial condition. It just happens that the last statement executed is ++a; so that gets printed "for free" by the console. –  Pointy Jun 26 '12 at 16:16
1  
@Romil sorry, but that statement is incorrect. They're not the same in the context of the browser JavaScript console, which always prints out the result value of the statement. Try it yourself from your browser right now. –  Pointy Jun 26 '12 at 16:17
2  
AH!! Penny drops...The browser always prints out the final value. Thank you - that's made it suddenly very clear and I'm glad I'm not cracking up. –  Mat Richardson Jun 26 '12 at 16:19
1  
For anyone interested, here's a question that deals with the "return" value of statement blocks. (Only observable with eval.) jsfiddle.net/gNfCV –  squint Jun 26 '12 at 17:01

In both cases, you're seeing an extra digit because the console is outputting the result of the last statement in the loop.

When that code is not executed directly in the console, you will not see what appears to be an extra digit.

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while statements don't have a "result". –  Rocket Hazmat Jun 26 '12 at 16:20
    
true, but in the context of the console it will output the last statement –  tybro0103 Jun 26 '12 at 16:21

See the fiddle with their response. Both return 1 to 6.

a++ : It returns the value of a before increment.

++a : It returns the value of a after increment.

Loops executes until value of 'a'<= 6.

When you run any code on console, it evalutes the variable value and prints its value also that's why you are getting one more 6 and 7 in the output.

No worries, when you'll run this code, will get the 1-6 values only.

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Probably should read through the comments. OP is asking about the observed output in the console, which will usually include 7 for the second code example. –  squint Jun 26 '12 at 17:06
1  
Please check the jsfiddle.net/eqA8t . I too checked in the console.. It returns 6 only. :):) –  Nishu Tayal Jun 26 '12 at 17:08
    
What the jsfiddle shows doesn't matter since that's not what OP is asking about. If you type the code directly into the console, it'll usually include the 7. (I say "usually" because there may be some console out there that doesn't do this.) The question wasn't entirely clear on that, but the comments cleared it up. –  squint Jun 26 '12 at 17:13

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